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Month: May 2022

BBC News – Health RSS Feed – World News

Hepatitis in children: How many cases are there?

Published4 MaySharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesHealth officials are continuing to investigate a sudden surge in cases of hepatitis or liver inflammation among young children in the UK and around the world. Several possible causes are being looked at, but it looks likely that a common virus which usually causes colds, vomiting and diarrhoea has a role to play.A return to normal social mixing after the pandemic could also be a factor.What is hepatitis? Hepatitis is the catch-all term to describe inflammation of the liver tissue. How do you get hepatitis?It is often caused by a viral infection - but also by exposure to some chemicals, alcohol, drugs and certain genetic disorders. The most common forms of hepatitis - known as A to E - are caused by specific viral infections. However, those viruses have not been detected in these cases in children.Scientists are now focusing on one particular adenovirus as the underlying cause but it doesn't usually cause severe hepatitis, so there must be something else going on.How were these cases spotted? A "signal" indicating a small but unusual rise in cases in previously healthy young children was first picked up in Scotland.That triggered an investigation by the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) which has now looked back at hospital admissions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland since January. It is now looking into at least 163 cases in children under 10, with the majority children younger than five years old.They had initial symptoms of vomiting and diarrhoea followed by yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, called jaundice.Of the confirmed cases, 118 live in England, 22 in Scotland, 13 in Wales and 10 in Northern Ireland.Most have a mild form of the condition, although 11 have needed a liver transplant.How many children are affected worldwide?After the UK started reporting a sharp rise in cases of acute severe hepatitis, although in relatively small numbers, awareness increased in other countries and they also started looking for the same condition in children. As of 1 May, at least 228 probable cases of hepatitis in 20 countries have been reported to the World Health Organization (WHO). It says another 50 cases are under investigation.The majority have been detected in Europe, including Ireland and the Netherlands, but some are also in the Americas, the western Pacific and south-east Asia.The death of one child from hepatitis has been reported.What could be causing this? Scientists are still investigating if there has been a rise in hepatitis in children or an increase in awareness of these hepatitis cases which would go undetected in a normal year. But there is no reason to believe the rare liver condition itself is spreading around the world - it's simply being spotted in children in different countries.Scientists are looking at adenovirus which was detected in around three-quarters of the UK children with confirmed hepatitis who were tested.Adenoviruses are usually spread by close personal contact and can cause sickness, diarrhoea and colds. There are more than 50 types.One particular type called F41 is interesting scientists. Genetic analysis has also detected another virus called AAV2 in some samples. Health officials believe adenovirus is likely to be making a comeback after virtually disappearing during the first year of the pandemic, or it may have developed a different strain.Its impact on young children's immune systems, who have no previous exposure to adenovirus or protection against it, could to be behind the current surge.Lab data in the UK shows that common viruses are now spreading in children, particularly the under-fives, at a higher level than in previous years.What is the risk?UK health officials say the likelihood of your child developing hepatitis is "extremely low".They say any children with symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhoea should stay at home until 48 hours after symptoms have stopped.And making sure children wash their hands thoroughly can help to reduce the spread of lots of common infections.Could this be something to do with Covid vaccinations? No - none of the children had been vaccinated.Covid vaccines are only available from five years old in the UK, meaning many of the children diagnosed with hepatitis would not have been eligible. Child hepatitis cases falsely linked to Covid jabWhat about a Covid infection itself? Around 16% of cases were positive for coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) when admitted to hospital, but because there was lots of Covid around at the time, health officials say this is not unexpected.UK health officials say they are looking at previous Covid infections in the children affected as well as the possible emergence of a new variant of adenovirus.It says it is continuing to investigate a wide range of other infections and causes.Studies suggest small numbers of babies and children infected with Covid have needed treatment for hepatitis in other countries such as the US as well as Brazil and also India. In most of those cases, the patients recovered quickly and were discharged in days.What should parents look out for? Parents, GPs and other healthcare workers have been asked to look out for the symptoms of jaundice, a yellow tinge to the skin and other parts of the body, which is most easily seen in the whites of the eyes. Other symptoms of hepatitis in children include: dark urinepale, grey-coloured pooitchy skinmuscle and joint paina high temperaturefeeling and being sickfeeling unusually tired all the timeloss of appetitestomach painMore on this storyVirus probable cause of mysterious child hepatitis25 April

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BBC News – Health RSS Feed – World News

Hepatitis in children: How many cases are there?

Published4 MaySharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesHealth officials are continuing to investigate a sudden surge in cases of hepatitis or liver inflammation among young children in the UK and around the world. Several possible causes are being looked at, but it looks likely that a common virus which usually causes colds, vomiting and diarrhoea has a role to play.A return to normal social mixing after the pandemic could also be a factor.What is hepatitis? Hepatitis is the catch-all term to describe inflammation of the liver tissue. How do you get hepatitis?It is often caused by a viral infection - but also by exposure to some chemicals, alcohol, drugs and certain genetic disorders. The most common forms of hepatitis - known as A to E - are caused by specific viral infections. However, those viruses have not been detected in these cases in children.Scientists are now focusing on one particular adenovirus as the underlying cause but it doesn't usually cause severe hepatitis, so there must be something else going on.How were these cases spotted? A "signal" indicating a small but unusual rise in cases in previously healthy young children was first picked up in Scotland.That triggered an investigation by the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) which has now looked back at hospital admissions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland since January. It is now looking into at least 163 cases in children under 10, with the majority children younger than five years old.They had initial symptoms of vomiting and diarrhoea followed by yellowing of the skin or whites of the eyes, called jaundice.Of the confirmed cases, 118 live in England, 22 in Scotland, 13 in Wales and 10 in Northern Ireland.Most have a mild form of the condition, although 11 have needed a liver transplant.How many children are affected worldwide?After the UK started reporting a sharp rise in cases of acute severe hepatitis, although in relatively small numbers, awareness increased in other countries and they also started looking for the same condition in children. As of 1 May, at least 228 probable cases of hepatitis in 20 countries have been reported to the World Health Organization (WHO). It says another 50 cases are under investigation.The majority have been detected in Europe, including Ireland and the Netherlands, but some are also in the Americas, the western Pacific and south-east Asia.The death of one child from hepatitis has been reported.What could be causing this? Scientists are still investigating if there has been a rise in hepatitis in children or an increase in awareness of these hepatitis cases which would go undetected in a normal year. But there is no reason to believe the rare liver condition itself is spreading around the world - it's simply being spotted in children in different countries.Scientists are looking at adenovirus which was detected in around three-quarters of the UK children with confirmed hepatitis who were tested.Adenoviruses are usually spread by close personal contact and can cause sickness, diarrhoea and colds. There are more than 50 types.One particular type called F41 is interesting scientists. Genetic analysis has also detected another virus called AAV2 in some samples. Health officials believe adenovirus is likely to be making a comeback after virtually disappearing during the first year of the pandemic, or it may have developed a different strain.Its impact on young children's immune systems, who have no previous exposure to adenovirus or protection against it, could to be behind the current surge.Lab data in the UK shows that common viruses are now spreading in children, particularly the under-fives, at a higher level than in previous years.What is the risk?UK health officials say the likelihood of your child developing hepatitis is "extremely low".They say any children with symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhoea should stay at home until 48 hours after symptoms have stopped.And making sure children wash their hands thoroughly can help to reduce the spread of lots of common infections.Could this be something to do with Covid vaccinations? No - none of the children had been vaccinated.Covid vaccines are only available from five years old in the UK, meaning many of the children diagnosed with hepatitis would not have been eligible. Child hepatitis cases falsely linked to Covid jabWhat about a Covid infection itself? Around 16% of cases were positive for coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) when admitted to hospital, but because there was lots of Covid around at the time, health officials say this is not unexpected.UK health officials say they are looking at previous Covid infections in the children affected as well as the possible emergence of a new variant of adenovirus.It says it is continuing to investigate a wide range of other infections and causes.Studies suggest small numbers of babies and children infected with Covid have needed treatment for hepatitis in other countries such as the US as well as Brazil and also India. In most of those cases, the patients recovered quickly and were discharged in days.What should parents look out for? Parents, GPs and other healthcare workers have been asked to look out for the symptoms of jaundice, a yellow tinge to the skin and other parts of the body, which is most easily seen in the whites of the eyes. Other symptoms of hepatitis in children include: dark urinepale, grey-coloured pooitchy skinmuscle and joint paina high temperaturefeeling and being sickfeeling unusually tired all the timeloss of appetitestomach painMore on this storyVirus probable cause of mysterious child hepatitis25 April

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Animenewsnetwork - Series/volume Review

My Love Mix-Up! GN 2 & 3

I am perhaps reading too much into this, but it's wonderful that in My Love Mix-Up! we have a manga starring characters who can be interpreted as bisexual and demisexual, two orientations that don't always get the visibility that they deserve. After a volume of agonizing over it, Aoki in volume two seems fully accepting of the fact that he likes Ida, and for his part Ida is coming to terms with the idea that getting to know Aoki as a person is allowing him to fall for the other boy, suggesting that he's the sort of person doesn't become attracted to someone without knowing them first. There's also some hint that Ida felt lacking somehow in never having had a crush before now, which is a topic I hope to see explored at least a little more because it's a very real thing experienced by people who aren't allosexual or heteronormative. But even if this isn't a deliberate part of the story Wataru Hinekure is writing (and since it doesn't develop hugely across these two books, so it might not be) it adds a good interpretive layer to the text, which helps to balance the humor of the piece. And although this is still funny, both of these books are overall less silly volume than their predecessor, at least in terms of story. (The art still has an abundance of weird faces, which honestly don't add much to the experience and at times actively detract from it. It's a relief to see them decrease in volume three.) There's a lot more internal anguishing going on, but that brings with it the revelation that Aida isn't the person Aoki is afraid he is. Throughout volume one and a good portion of volume two, Aida comes across as a leading contender for “most tactless human being.” He puts his foot in his mouth, tramples all over peoples' feelings, and suffers from the delusion that he has amazing powers of intuition. In a nice piece of storytelling, Hashimoto tells Aoki that those are the things she likes about him; in her eyes, they make him funny and warm. Aoki's more than a little floored by this, because to him those are Aida's least charming qualities and part of the reason he doesn't want to admit to his best friend that he's got a crush on another boy. He thinks that, given Aida's track record, that he will react badly, and at first it looks like he does: he instantly tries to set the record straight according to his interpretation by telling Ida that Aoki was lying about his crush. But when Hashimoto tells him off after she finds out what happened from a very upset Aoki (while still doing her best not to give away Aoki's secrets), Aida snaps to. As he says to Aoki when he's apologizing, if his initial reaction (a homophobic one) was "normal," "Then normal is wrong." By volume three he is wholeheartedly behind Aoki like the good friend he turns out to be, and in volume three there's an adorable scene where both Aoki and Aida try to leave each other alone with Hashimoto and Ida to facilitate confessions – one of which turns out rather better than the other. Interestingly enough, that's largely because even though Aida isn't the jerk Aoki was afraid he'd be, he really is still the person whose traits both Hashimoto and Aoki recognize. When Hashimoto eventually musters up the courage to tell him why she likes him, it turns out that he doesn't remember a single one of the moments that meant so much to her. That's not really his fault, but the way he says it is spectacularly crushing, and Hashimoto is sent into a tailspin. What's interesting about this section is that Aoki's desperate attempts to get Aida to remember Hashimoto from their entrance exams and first year of high school only result in Aida recalling how he and Aoki became friends. Presumably this isn't going to lead to further mix-ups where Aida decides he has a thing for Aoki, but it says a lot about how Aida does and doesn't process things while also suggesting that maybe Hashimoto doesn't really know him at all, instead basing her feelings on what she assumes to be true rather than who Aida actually is. In the meantime, Aida's interference causes Ida to go into full introspective mode. He's mostly been very quiet about his feelings and his reaction to Aoki's emotions, in part because he wants to do the right thing without hurting the other boy needlessly, but also because he's very uncertain of his own emotions. Ida's a bit infamous among his friends for being the dense guy who never has crushes, and while they don't mean anything by it, we can see from volume two that Ida has started to wonder whether or not there's something wrong with him. He doesn't just fall for any attractive person, and that's accounted kind of weird by his pals, although they're pretty good-natured about it. That Ida, starting to really get to know Aoki by spending time with him, is beginning to feel some unusual things in his chest indicates that he ties attraction to how well he knows the person, something borne out in volume three when he decides to take a chance on Aoki. While he might have initially thought Aoki was nice or cute is less important than how his interactions with him go. That he's at least a little upset and embarrassed when Aida tries to “fix” things shows that he's starting to like Aoki, it's just that he doesn't recognize the emotion because it's new to him, and ultimately he decides to explore that. While the writing is a nice mix of thoughtful and fun, the art does occasionally get in the way of the story. Mostly this is the exaggerated reaction faces; while My Love Mix-Up! certainly isn't Blue Flag (nor is it trying to be), it is serious enough in some of its scenes that having Aoki make a gorilla face when surprised or sad feels out of place and tonally dissonant in the moment. Likewise Aida's Sherlock Holmes get up when he thinks he's figured something out doesn't always work; it feels like the manga is afraid to allow itself to be serious. There is one excellent page in volume two where Aida starts to put the pieces together about Aoki and Ida that's show as puzzle pieces slowly coming together around Aida's face, but more often the artistic flourishes simply get in the way. When Aruko limits herself to just showing the action, like in the infuriating scene where a teacher accuses Aoki of cheating or in the insanity that is the school trip/skiing intensive, the manga works much better. My Love Mix-Up! is shaping up to be more than just the goofy story it seemed in its first volume. It's maintaining its light touch while still covering some serious topics, and there's a slight feeling that the ludicrous ski trip is functioning as a metaphor for emotional courage and the way that neither Aoki nor Hashimoto can bring themselves to put their hearts on the line by confessing, which works surprisingly well while still being entertaining. The only thing keeping it from being near-perfect is the art, which at times actively undermines the narrative. But even with that issue, this is still worth picking up – it's fun and sweet, but also has that dollop of romantic angst to keep the story moving.

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Animenewsnetwork - All reviews

My Love Mix-Up! GN 2 & 3

I am perhaps reading too much into this, but it's wonderful that in My Love Mix-Up! we have a manga starring characters who can be interpreted as bisexual and demisexual, two orientations that don't always get the visibility that they deserve. After a volume of agonizing over it, Aoki in volume two seems fully accepting of the fact that he likes Ida, and for his part Ida is coming to terms with the idea that getting to know Aoki as a person is allowing him to fall for the other boy, suggesting that he's the sort of person doesn't become attracted to someone without knowing them first. There's also some hint that Ida felt lacking somehow in never having had a crush before now, which is a topic I hope to see explored at least a little more because it's a very real thing experienced by people who aren't allosexual or heteronormative. But even if this isn't a deliberate part of the story Wataru Hinekure is writing (and since it doesn't develop hugely across these two books, so it might not be) it adds a good interpretive layer to the text, which helps to balance the humor of the piece. And although this is still funny, both of these books are overall less silly volume than their predecessor, at least in terms of story. (The art still has an abundance of weird faces, which honestly don't add much to the experience and at times actively detract from it. It's a relief to see them decrease in volume three.) There's a lot more internal anguishing going on, but that brings with it the revelation that Aida isn't the person Aoki is afraid he is. Throughout volume one and a good portion of volume two, Aida comes across as a leading contender for “most tactless human being.” He puts his foot in his mouth, tramples all over peoples' feelings, and suffers from the delusion that he has amazing powers of intuition. In a nice piece of storytelling, Hashimoto tells Aoki that those are the things she likes about him; in her eyes, they make him funny and warm. Aoki's more than a little floored by this, because to him those are Aida's least charming qualities and part of the reason he doesn't want to admit to his best friend that he's got a crush on another boy. He thinks that, given Aida's track record, that he will react badly, and at first it looks like he does: he instantly tries to set the record straight according to his interpretation by telling Ida that Aoki was lying about his crush. But when Hashimoto tells him off after she finds out what happened from a very upset Aoki (while still doing her best not to give away Aoki's secrets), Aida snaps to. As he says to Aoki when he's apologizing, if his initial reaction (a homophobic one) was "normal," "Then normal is wrong." By volume three he is wholeheartedly behind Aoki like the good friend he turns out to be, and in volume three there's an adorable scene where both Aoki and Aida try to leave each other alone with Hashimoto and Ida to facilitate confessions – one of which turns out rather better than the other. Interestingly enough, that's largely because even though Aida isn't the jerk Aoki was afraid he'd be, he really is still the person whose traits both Hashimoto and Aoki recognize. When Hashimoto eventually musters up the courage to tell him why she likes him, it turns out that he doesn't remember a single one of the moments that meant so much to her. That's not really his fault, but the way he says it is spectacularly crushing, and Hashimoto is sent into a tailspin. What's interesting about this section is that Aoki's desperate attempts to get Aida to remember Hashimoto from their entrance exams and first year of high school only result in Aida recalling how he and Aoki became friends. Presumably this isn't going to lead to further mix-ups where Aida decides he has a thing for Aoki, but it says a lot about how Aida does and doesn't process things while also suggesting that maybe Hashimoto doesn't really know him at all, instead basing her feelings on what she assumes to be true rather than who Aida actually is. In the meantime, Aida's interference causes Ida to go into full introspective mode. He's mostly been very quiet about his feelings and his reaction to Aoki's emotions, in part because he wants to do the right thing without hurting the other boy needlessly, but also because he's very uncertain of his own emotions. Ida's a bit infamous among his friends for being the dense guy who never has crushes, and while they don't mean anything by it, we can see from volume two that Ida has started to wonder whether or not there's something wrong with him. He doesn't just fall for any attractive person, and that's accounted kind of weird by his pals, although they're pretty good-natured about it. That Ida, starting to really get to know Aoki by spending time with him, is beginning to feel some unusual things in his chest indicates that he ties attraction to how well he knows the person, something borne out in volume three when he decides to take a chance on Aoki. While he might have initially thought Aoki was nice or cute is less important than how his interactions with him go. That he's at least a little upset and embarrassed when Aida tries to “fix” things shows that he's starting to like Aoki, it's just that he doesn't recognize the emotion because it's new to him, and ultimately he decides to explore that. While the writing is a nice mix of thoughtful and fun, the art does occasionally get in the way of the story. Mostly this is the exaggerated reaction faces; while My Love Mix-Up! certainly isn't Blue Flag (nor is it trying to be), it is serious enough in some of its scenes that having Aoki make a gorilla face when surprised or sad feels out of place and tonally dissonant in the moment. Likewise Aida's Sherlock Holmes get up when he thinks he's figured something out doesn't always work; it feels like the manga is afraid to allow itself to be serious. There is one excellent page in volume two where Aida starts to put the pieces together about Aoki and Ida that's show as puzzle pieces slowly coming together around Aida's face, but more often the artistic flourishes simply get in the way. When Aruko limits herself to just showing the action, like in the infuriating scene where a teacher accuses Aoki of cheating or in the insanity that is the school trip/skiing intensive, the manga works much better. My Love Mix-Up! is shaping up to be more than just the goofy story it seemed in its first volume. It's maintaining its light touch while still covering some serious topics, and there's a slight feeling that the ludicrous ski trip is functioning as a metaphor for emotional courage and the way that neither Aoki nor Hashimoto can bring themselves to put their hearts on the line by confessing, which works surprisingly well while still being entertaining. The only thing keeping it from being near-perfect is the art, which at times actively undermines the narrative. But even with that issue, this is still worth picking up – it's fun and sweet, but also has that dollop of romantic angst to keep the story moving.

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BBC News – Health RSS Feed – World News

How to get a Covid test

Published3 MaySharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesMost people in England and Scotland can no longer get free PCR or lateral flow tests (LFTs). A few groups are still entitled to free Covid tests, including the most vulnerable, as well as frontline NHS staff. Some limited free testing for the public will continue in Wales and Northern Ireland until the end of June. What's the guidance if I have Covid now?How has testing changed in England?Free LFTs are no longer generally available to members of the public. Most people with symptoms are no longer entitled to free PCR tests either. Some groups can still get free tests:NHS staff who care for patientshospital patients who need PCRs before treatmentcare home residentspeople working in high-risk settings, including care homes and prisonshospital patients who are discharged to care homes or hospicesIf you still qualify, you may be able to order LFTs online (if you have an NHS login), or by calling 119. People who are eligible for community Covid drug treatments because they're at higher risk if they catch Covid are being sent LFTs to keep at home in case they develop symptoms. The government says it will be able to expand the testing system again in the future if necessary, such as if a new variant of concern emerges. You may still need to test before or after travelling abroad. You must buy private tests for this - you can't use free NHS tests. England: Testing guidance Can I buy lateral flow tests now?Yes. High street pharmacies charge about £2 per test.The government has a list of private test providers. However, you cannot report the result of a privately-bought LFT on the government website. Image source, Getty ImagesHow is testing changing in Scotland?People with symptoms in Scotland are no longer asked to take a PCR test and self isolate - instead they are advised to stay at home while they are unwell or have a fever.Testing for the general population has ended, apart from certain groups including health and social workers, hospital or care home visitors, hospital patients and unpaid carers.How is testing changing in Wales? Wales will keep some free testing capacity until the end of June: PCR tests won't be freely available free LFTs will be available for people with symptomspeople should isolate if positivecontact tracing will continueAfter then, free LFTs won't be available, contact tracing and self-isolation support payments will end, and self-isolation guidance will be updated to advise ill people to stay at home.Wales: Testing guidanceWhat about testing in Northern Ireland? Northern Ireland will also keep some free testing capacity until the end of June. most people with symptoms will be asked to take an LFT instead - although this requirement will be removed before the end of June routine testing in special schools is still taking place and may continue until the end of Junecontact tracing will be phased out by the end of Juneroutine testing for health and social care staff continues, subject to reviewanyone who has to test for clinical reasons or to receive treatment still has access to PCRs or LFTs as requiredNorthern Ireland: Test, Trace and Protect transition planBOOSTER: Who can get the fourth jab and how do you book it?SYMPTOMS: Is a runny nose a cold or Covid?ISOLATION: What is the Covid isolation advice now?MANAGING COVID: How to look after yourself at homeCOVID CASES: How many cases are there in my area?LONG COVID: What is it and what are the symptoms?TREATMENT: What progress is being made?

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BBC News – Health RSS Feed – World News

How to get a Covid test

Published3 MaySharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesMost people in England and Scotland can no longer get free PCR or lateral flow tests (LFTs). A few groups are still entitled to free Covid tests, including the most vulnerable, as well as frontline NHS staff. Some limited free testing for the public will continue in Wales and Northern Ireland until the end of June. What's the guidance if I have Covid now?How has testing changed in England?Free LFTs are no longer generally available to members of the public. Most people with symptoms are no longer entitled to free PCR tests either. Some groups can still get free tests:NHS staff who care for patientshospital patients who need PCRs before treatmentcare home residentspeople working in high-risk settings, including care homes and prisonshospital patients who are discharged to care homes or hospicesIf you still qualify, you may be able to order LFTs online (if you have an NHS login), or by calling 119. People who are eligible for community Covid drug treatments because they're at higher risk if they catch Covid are being sent LFTs to keep at home in case they develop symptoms. The government says it will be able to expand the testing system again in the future if necessary, such as if a new variant of concern emerges. You may still need to test before or after travelling abroad. You must buy private tests for this - you can't use free NHS tests. England: Testing guidance Can I buy lateral flow tests now?Yes. High street pharmacies charge about £2 per test.The government has a list of private test providers. However, you cannot report the result of a privately-bought LFT on the government website. Image source, Getty ImagesHow is testing changing in Scotland?People with symptoms in Scotland are no longer asked to take a PCR test and self isolate - instead they are advised to stay at home while they are unwell or have a fever.Testing for the general population has ended, apart from certain groups including health and social workers, hospital or care home visitors, hospital patients and unpaid carers.How is testing changing in Wales? Wales will keep some free testing capacity until the end of June: PCR tests won't be freely available free LFTs will be available for people with symptomspeople should isolate if positivecontact tracing will continueAfter then, free LFTs won't be available, contact tracing and self-isolation support payments will end, and self-isolation guidance will be updated to advise ill people to stay at home.Wales: Testing guidanceWhat about testing in Northern Ireland? Northern Ireland will also keep some free testing capacity until the end of June. most people with symptoms will be asked to take an LFT instead - although this requirement will be removed before the end of June routine testing in special schools is still taking place and may continue until the end of Junecontact tracing will be phased out by the end of Juneroutine testing for health and social care staff continues, subject to reviewanyone who has to test for clinical reasons or to receive treatment still has access to PCRs or LFTs as requiredNorthern Ireland: Test, Trace and Protect transition planBOOSTER: Who can get the fourth jab and how do you book it?SYMPTOMS: Is a runny nose a cold or Covid?ISOLATION: What is the Covid isolation advice now?MANAGING COVID: How to look after yourself at homeCOVID CASES: How many cases are there in my area?LONG COVID: What is it and what are the symptoms?TREATMENT: What progress is being made?

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UK News - Evening Standard RSS Feed

Evri warning over phishing text message scam: How to report and what is smishing?

People are urged to be wary of a scam text claiming to be from delivery service Evri, as scammers are reportedly trying to steal victims’ payment details.Florence Trust, which reports on website scams, warned its readers of the Evri text message scam in April.But what is the Evri text scam? This is what to be on the lookout for.What is Evri?Evri is a delivery service formerly known as Hermes–the delivery firm rebranded in March 2022 with a new name and logo. While the new name may be unfamiliar, Evri is a legitimate delivery company.READ MOREWhat is the Evri text message scam?There are reports that people are receiving texts that appear to be from the Evri delivery service that say they need to pay for redelivery, as part of a “smishing” scam.The scammers say the redelivery fee is £1.45 and the text includes a link to a fake Evri website (evri-redelivery.com), where victims of the scam can enter their bank details.Although the amount of money they are claiming is small, the scammers are reportedly looking to steal people’s payment details.Florence Trust reported that the texts have been in circulation since April 13, 2022, and the numbers that people should be on the look out for are 44 (756) 896-3015 and (739) 419-4403.However, be aware that the text could come from other numbers too.How to report the Evri scam textAn Evri spokesperson told the Evening Standard: “We’re aware of smishing attempts claiming to be Evri, where individuals are receiving a text message including a link to pay for parcel delivery. We would never ask for payment in this way.” Evri shared advice for avoiding scams on its website, and says that anyone who receives the text should take a screenshot and report it to [email protected] You can also forward the text to 7726 for free.Do not click on the link or enter your details on any third-party website.What is smishing?Smishing comes from phishing, which is when scammers “fish” for your personal data via email or social media. Smishing is when scammers send people fake links via text or “SMS” message.

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Animenewsnetwork - Series/volume Review

A Man and His Cat GN 5

Reading a volume of A Man and His Cat can be emotionally exhausting. That's not necessarily a bad thing, because creator Umi Sakurai truly captures the ups and downs of having a pet. This volume, however, covers a more difficult topic than most in the series: what happens when an indoor cat gets out and can't find their way back home. Certainly we could have seen this coming from the end of volume four. Fukumaru, snug in his house, sees a long-haired black cat out in the yard, and realizes with horror that he knew him as the cat in the pet store. He was adopted (well, bought) by a family with a young son, and as far as Fukumaru knew, had been living a wonderful, happy life with them. So how did the cat end up battered on the street? Desperate to find out, Fukumaru takes advantage of an open door when Mr. Kanda comes home, and the next thing he knows, he's out on the street himself, with no idea how to get home. Meanwhile, we see Moja collapse in the rain behind another house, clearly on the verge of death. If you're a pet lover, this is easily one of the most upsetting volumes of the series thus far. Before you decide that you're dropping it merely from this description, however, allow me to reassure you that things do work out for everyone – this is no Where the Red Fern Grows or Stone Fox. But that Sakurai can evoke that anxiety in us is a testament to how well the story is told and the truth of the emotions that the characters express. While we can relate to Mr. Kanda's fear and panic, it's also not hard to fully believe the feelings of the cats as well – how many people who had a cat go on a walkabout didn't believe that the cat was scared and sad? And if you've ever worked to slowly coax a stray to trust you, it's easy to see the fear and worry in the animal's body language. What Sakurai is doing is tapping into both of those sets of feelings, human and animal, and combining them to create a volume that is harrowing on several levels, making the moments when things work out even better. In part this is so effective because of the way that the human characters all react to Fukumaru's escape. Mr. Kanda is fully hysterical and trying very, very hard not to appear that way. From his initial guilt that he let the cat out to his panicked run out the door, he's almost reliving the pain of his wife's loss again, only now with an added dose of grief because it's his fault (in his mind) that Fukumaru ran out the door. When he eventually pulls himself together enough to make a poster and ask the pet store to hang it up it looks very much like he's just putting on a brave face, something that Miss Sato, the woman who sold him Fukumaru, sees through immediately. When she takes over the rescue effort, telling him that he needs more posters and that he should call in his friends, Mr. Kanda's relief is palpable; not only is he not alone in this anymore, but someone is telling him what to do, which is plainly reassuring. That all of his friends actually show up to help is another relief, because a piece of him didn't think that they actually would – because to other people, Fukumaru may be “just” a cat. The art does a particularly good job of helping to show the toll the plot of this volume takes on Kanda and Fukumaru both. As Fukumaru gets skinnier and scruffier the longer he's out, Mr. Kanda's face grows increasingly haggard, the bags under his eyes increasing in depth and darkness as he wears himself to a frazzle. When he finds Moja while looking for Fukumaru and has to make a difficult decision, we can read his despair in his body language. No longer the perfectly groomed elderly gentleman, Mr. Kanda becomes something more human as he grows disheveled, reminding us that he really is just as human as anyone else, something that those around him don't always see or remember. Fortunately there are some lighter moments to balance out the emotionally heavy content of most of the book. Once the main storyline is resolved, we get one of the most perfect depictions of cat barfing I've ever seen, which is not nearly as gross as it sounds; it's more about Mr. Kanda trying to delicately get the cat to throw up on something easier to clean than the floor/rug and utterly failing, because cats are going to be cats. There's also a light treatment of the way owners tend to think that overfeeding a pet equals love; it doesn't go into health issues or anything like that, simply acknowledging that it's a thing that happens and that we maybe shouldn't do it. A Man and His Cat, though a bit heavier this time around, is still a remarkably consistent and heartwarming series. It may make me tear up at least once a volume, but it captures the way that a pet can enrich our lives beautifully, and to do that it does need to cover the darker moments as well as the fluffy ones. But it never loses its sweet and hopeful touch, and that combination of emotions is what makes it such a successful series about the ups and downs of sharing your life with a cat. There's a reason why the French title of the series is “The Cat Who Makes the Man Happy.”

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