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Day: 8 June 2022

BBC News – Business RSS Feed – World News

'It is all about raising the profile of carers'

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Rebekah ZammettIt was early evening, and Rebekah Zammett was about to leave her north Oxfordshire home to work a nightshift looking after teenagers at a local residential institution. But then a thud came from the bedroom of her son Jack, who has cerebral palsy. The then eight-year-old was having a seizure - one of dozens he experienced every day. Critical questions ran through her mind as his convulsions ebbed and flowed."Has it really ended? Is this one for the ambulance? Do we need to administer emergency medication," remembers Rebekah."No-one knows his medical history and the intricacies of his needs like I do. Not even my husband." As the anxious minutes ticked by, Rebekah was acutely aware that people at her workplace - both staff and teenagers - were relying on her to turn up for her shift.Image source, Getty Images"I just felt really torn," she says. "The staff caring for the children at the home wouldn't be able to clock-off until I got there. And they would have done at least 12 hours with kids who had very high-level, complex needs."But if I did go to work, how on earth could I concentrate on that?"Thankfully, Jack's seizure didn't require hospitalisation, and after waiting an hour to satisfy herself that he was stable, Rebekah went to work.But there's been no let up in the pressure: Jack, now 13, needs help to eat, dress and go to the toilet, and must attend many regular hospital appointments. This year's Carers Week, which is currently running across the UK until Sunday, 12 June, aims to throw a spotlight on the pressures facing the estimated 10.5 million people who are now supporting an elderly, disabled, or seriously ill relative or other loved one.Image source, Getty ImagesCharity Carers UK, one of the main organisers of the annual event, says that this 10.5 million figure equates to one adult in five having such unpaid caring duties.For many, like Rebekah, it can be very tricky to balance this work with their paid, day job.Her breaking point came when a previous employer wanted her to work extra hours to make up for the time she had taken off to care for Jack as he recovered from major surgery."I just couldn't go back in there knowing what they thought of me… that I've taken liberties. I felt completely broken." She quit the next day.An increasing number of carers are making the tough decision to leave the workforce. Carers UK says that just before the pandemic hit, 600 people a day were quitting work to look after a loved one. That figure is thought to be even higher now.However, falling off the work-carer tightrope can have devastating financial consequences, especially in light of the current cost of living crisis. That's been the experience of Kim Harry-Young from Newport, Wales, who had to stop working as a nightclub DJ three years ago to care for both her autistic 16-year-old son Logan, and her wife Michelle, who suffers from epilepsy.Image source, Kim Harry-Young"Financially it's a problem," says Kim. "You have to cut your spending."She is relying on benefits to survive. But it's not just the money she's missing. "I miss [performing] in front of people, being with people. But it's impossible to go back to work. You do feel alone sometimes, because it's just you doing it."To compound matters further, Kim developed breast cancer since quitting work - but is now in remission. "We're lucky," she says. "Family and friend support is everything. Without them, I don't know what we'd do."Carers UK says that around 2.2 million carers are now worried about being able to cope financially, and the Joseph Rowntree Foundation reports a quarter of carers have slipped into poverty.But it's not just the carers who suffer if they're not part of the workforce. The wider economy takes a hit as well. An academic study in 2018 estimated that the annual cost of carers leaving the workforce was about £2.9bn in benefit payments and lost tax revenues.Furthermore, the UK is in the grip of a recruitment crisis. There are now more job vacancies than there are unemployed people to fill them. Disruption in the travel industry, hospitality sector and healthcare are all blamed on chronic staff shortages.The economy can ill-afford to have more people leave the workforce.New Economy is a new series exploring how businesses, trade, economies and working life are changing fast.The UK government and campaigners agree that flexible working and time off to deal with emergencies, are key to making workplaces more carer-friendly. But plans to improve those rights failed to make it into the legislative programme announced in May.Some companies have already taken matters into their own hands. Big firms like Natwest and British Gas are part of the Employers for Carers network, which currently comprises 245 member organisations from the public, private and voluntary sectors. Together they aim to boost carer-friendly employment policies.Insurance giant, Aviva, is part of the network. Its 22,000 staff can take up to 35 hours per year paid leave to deal with planned caring events and 35 hours for emergencies. The company also actively encourages flexible working to fit in around caring duties. Danielle Harmer, the company's chief people officer, believes most big companies should be able to introduce similar policies.Image source, Aviva"I don't think you do it just because it makes commercial sense," she says. "But of course it makes commercial sense to keep your talented people, and enable them to work out [the balance between] caring and work."If someone leaves, you have to replace them, maybe using a search firm and there are costs associated with that." She also estimates it can take up to six months for replacements to get fully up to speed."The retention of talent is a strong business case for what is actually doing the right thing," Meanwhile, Rebekah Zammett continues to care for her son Jack, and is balancing that with studying for an Open University degree from home.She's adamant that the UK must place more value on its army of carers and the contribution they make. "At the moment you're seen as low-skilled, and not a particularly desirable person to have around, " she says.She wants carers to be protected by equality legislation, and is urging the introduction of a new government payment for carers taking time off to deal with emergencies. "It's about raising the profile of carers and saying 'these people are really valuable to our workforce, they are committed and do care about their jobs'. Investing in [them] is investing in future generations."A UK government Department of Health and Social Care spokesperson said: "Carers play a vital role in our communities and we recognise their hard work and the huge contribution they make."We are investing up to £25m to work with the sector to kick start a change in the services provided to support unpaid carers - which could include respite and breaks, peer group and wellbeing support, and new ways to combine these to maximise their impact."BORN DEAF, RAISED HEARING: Jonny Cotsen explores what it means to live in two different worldsCAREER CHANGE WITH A DIFFERENCE: Police new recruits adapt to life on the beat

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jobsinjapan

How Hard Is It To Get a Non-English Teaching Job In Japan?

Getting a job anywhere can be difficult but it can be even more challenging to get a job in a foreign country and in a foreign language. To do well in the job hunting process you have to prepare properly and follow the Japanese style of job hunting, which is a little different from what you might be used to. What if I’m not a new graduate? Japan has a long tradition of hiring new graduates who, in times past, would be expected to dedicate most or even all of their working life to a company, and in return that company had very strict rules on firing to make sure employees were protected. This is changing in Japan and the “job for life” is looking like a thing of the past for younger generations. These days more and more Japanese are changing jobs mid-career and companies are looking for talent beyond the annual hiring of new graduates in April every year. Year round recruiting for key positions has become the norm. As a foreigner in Japan you can take advantage of many skills gaps in both early and mid-career positions, especially if you can speak Japanese to a business fluent level (though often this is not required). There is a massive skills gap in Japan, especially in the tech sector, and many companies desperately scramble to hire coders and engineers from overseas to fill this gap. This could be you, but there are a few important things you need to know to have a chance at getting some of these positions. The first hurdle: your resume. How is a Japanese Rirekisho different from a Resume?  Japanese have a very specific style of resume called a rirekisho 履歴書. It covers your education, experience, and certifications and has a specific format, along with some useful info for companies about how far you would be willing to commute and if you have children. It also includes a section for you to write a personal statement to sell yourself and introduce one of your good qualities. These can be VERY difficult to write for people who are not yet fully fluent. Writing a rirekisho is not the same as just writing your resume. It’s much stricter! For example, in most cases we do not put a date on our resume when applying for a position in Western countries, but in Japan there is usually a place for the date. This date should be the date you give the resume to the company, and it shows that it is up to date. A resume dated earlier, such as last month or last year is seen as rude, as if you didn’t care about this company enough to update your current experience level. Make sure you are consistent in using either the Western date system or Japanese throughout your rirekisho (2022 or 令和4, but not both) to demonstrate your attention to detail. It used to be standard for companies to ask for a handwritten resume. That’s right, even now this is still expected for some traditional companies! A candidate’s handwriting was considered to be part of the screening process, but luckily these days resume written on a computer are the norm at most jobs. Just make sure you get a friend to check your spelling and details for mistakes, which are rarely forgiven in an official document like this. How do I sell my talents with my free writing section? You have to walk a fine line to sell your talents in Japan without hubris. You should focus on two main points: 1) A clear and specific reason for applying for this job 2) How your skills and experience would be an asset to the company at this job This section of the rirekisho is sort of similar to a cover letter for most companies you would apply for in the West. The first priority is that you must be clear in your reason for applying. How does the company’s mission appeal to you and why would you want to choose this company over others. The person reading your application will be looking for someone who will fit well into the company culture, and someone who just wants to “make a good salary” and “have lots of holiday days” is not going to go to the top of the shortlist. Think about these questions: How did you learn about the company? What do you expect to achieve when working there (that will help the company make money and achieve its goals)? Does the description of the role fit well with things that motivate you to produce your best work (collaborative, travel to foreign countries, more responsibility for your work, creativity etc). A good way to do this is to look over the job description and directly write your free writing section to answer the problems that the company is talking about. If they say “the position requires someone who has experience with PHP and mySQL”, mention these skills directly somewhere in your rirekisho or in the free writing section. If they say “open collaboration between teams is something we pride ourselves on” then mention that you work best in an environment where open collaboration between teams is a great way for your best and most productive work to happen. Don’t be afraid to almost copy the words and phrases they look for, it will demonstrate that you read and thought about the description and role of the job directly. How do I pass the interview? Here’s where your Japanese language ability really gets to shine. Using the appropriate keigo 敬語 (polite/humble Japanese) can be difficult even for native Japanese speakers, so being able to do this to even just a passable level is bound to impress a Japanese interviewer. To pull this off, the key is to practise many answers to standard interview questions ahead of time so that you can feel confident in the content and language you are using in at least part of the interview. Don’t wing it on the day, even Japanese people don’t do that because confident expressions are difficult to come up with under pressure. If you know Japanese professionals, get them to help you with interview practice and to correct your keigo grammar – Japanese people do this too so don’t feel embarrassed if your Japanese level doesn’t feel perfect. This is hard, it’s okay to practise a lot. If you don’t have many Japanese friends who can help you with this, luckily there are free online seminars for learning about how to write resumes and do well in interview situations. These resume seminars cover key points about how to write an impressive resume that will pass screening, and show your strengths in order to get an interview. Click HERE to see more information about the next seminar on June 23rd, 2022! This seminar will cover everything you need to know about writing a MUCH better Japanese resume so you can succeed in your search for a job in Japanese. I hope this article has been useful for you and helps you with your application to work at a Japanese company. 

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Donald Trump and two of his children agree to testify in New York investigation

Donald Trump and two of his children, Ivanka Trump and Donald Trump Jr have agreed to testify in a New York state civil investigation into the former US president's business practices.State Attorney General Letitia James is investigating whether the Trump Organization misled lenders and tax authorities. The deal came more than six months after Ms James first issued subpoenas for their testimony, which Mr Trump, 75, and the children both in their 40s, fought bitterly in court.Last month, an intermediate state appeals court denied the Trumps' bid to avoid giving testimony.The Trumps had argued that testifying in the civil probe would violate their constitutional rights because their words could be used in a related criminal investigation led by Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg. Advertisement Their testimony, starting on 15 July, could last through the following week, according to an agreement with Ms James made public on Wednesday. The long-time chief financial officer of Trump's family company, Allen Weisselberg, was charged with tax fraud in the Manhattan probe last year. More on Donald Trump Related Topics: He has pleaded not guilty and is set to go on trial later this year.Republican Mr Trump has denied any wrongdoing, and called the investigation politically motivated as Ms James is a Democrat. Last month, a federal judge in the state capital of Albany dismissed a separate lawsuit by Mr Trump seeking to halt the probe on the grounds that she was politically biased.The judge found no evidence that she had acted in bad faith.The Trumps have until 13 June to ask New York state's highest court, the Court of Appeals, to further delay any testimony in Ms James's probe.

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