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Day: 11 June 2022

BBC News – Technology RSS Feed – World News

Samantha Cristoforetti: The astronaut taking TikTok to new heights

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Cosmic Kids Samantha Cristoforetti holds the record for longest uninterrupted spaceflight by a European astronaut - but you may know her for another bit of history. She is the first person to make a TikTok video on board the International Space Station (ISS).Cristoforetti has become a star on the social-media site, where her videos have had millions of views.Italy's first female astronaut is using her second space mission to help TikTok reach the final frontier.Cristoforetti first travelled to space in 2014, spending 199 days on board the ISS - then the record for the longest mission in space by a woman, although that has since been broken by Peggy Whitson, in 2017, and subsequently Christina Koch, in 2019.The European Space Agency astronaut returned in April 2022 and has been doing so in front of a growing crowd.One particular video, made in memory of Douglas Adams, author of the seminal sci-fi series The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, has picked up more than 17 million views on TikTok.Happy #TowelDay from the International @Space_Station! #TikTok #MissionMinerva pic.twitter.com/GLlS0MX9qd— Samantha Cristoforetti (@AstroSamantha) May 25, 2022 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on TwitterIn the video, Cristoforetti shows viewers how a wet towel behaves in weightlessness, while declaring she is "a hoopy frood who always knows where her towel is" - a well-known quote among Hitchhikers fans.The Italian has been making these jokes since she first went into space. Her initial mission was Nasa's 42nd expedition to the ISS. No prizes for guessing the theme, but you may be impressed by the official poster she tweeted.Space is big. Really big.Cristoforetti is currently part of the ISS's Minerva mission - named after the Roman goddess of wisdom and arts, in honour of "the sophisticated craftsmanship of the men and women all over the world who make human spaceflight possible".She is part of a crew of four who set off from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on 27 April in a SpaceX Dragon capsule. They are the fourth crew to travel to the ISS in a SpaceX vehicle.At the time of writing, her TikTok video detailing the process from launching to settling in at the ISS has received 1.2m views.Back on the International @Space_Station (and TikTok) pic.twitter.com/oCgJSdWKcu— Samantha Cristoforetti (@AstroSamantha) May 6, 2022 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on TwitterWhen she's not lighting up the internet with her punchy videos, Cristoforetti is working 12-hour days on maintenance and scientific research. One of her projects is to understand how ovarian cells function in a microgravity environment. And although it is at a preliminary stage, she believes the experiment could be beneficial to people on Earth."When you understand how that biology functions, then potentially you have a path to also develop targeted drugs and medical interventions to improve that function," she said. "One of the big focuses on the space station right now is to develop and mature technologies to do with life support - keeping humans alive in the environment of space."We have legacy equipment that's been on the space station functioning fairly well for a couple of decades now. But there is also a drive to develop the next generation of such equipment that needs to be more compact, more efficient, more robust, and need less maintenance."Her working day also includes mandatory exercise time, as long periods in space pose a risk to astronauts' health and can even lead to bone loss.You won't be surprised to hear by now that Cristoforetti has a TikTok for that, too.How do you run in space? 🤔🏃‍♂️ Happy #GlobalRunningDay! #MissionMinerva #Running #SpaceTok pic.twitter.com/RZtDfz8Rvu— Samantha Cristoforetti (@AstroSamantha) June 1, 2022 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on TwitterDeep ThoughtCristoforetti believes that within the next decade more people will be travelling beyond Earth's atmosphere. "I'm confident that we will also see space agencies setting their eyes on beyond low earth-orbit targets, specifically smaller spaces, such as the moon surface," she said.But back within the boundaries of Earth, Cristoforetti has some words of advice for aspiring astronauts.She told the BBC "it takes so much good luck" to become an astronaut, and she believes all astronauts are "incredibly grateful and cognisant of that privilege". During a recent campaign to select a new class of astronauts, there was a conscious effort to "reach out to young women to make sure the pool of applicants... was [as] diverse as possible"."I wouldn't say that it's an environment that is in any way hostile to women," Cristoforetti added. "So it's really just about finding a path and studying the right thing. "It's especially a good idea to study a stem subject - science, technology, engineering and maths - even medicine, and then find a way into the industry."Image source, NASAAnd for even younger aspiring astronauts, Cristoforetti has set herself an additional workout challenge in space. The astronaut will be practising yoga on the ISS, something children on Earth will be able to watch and participate in.Surely only a matter of time before Cristoforetti releases a space yoga video on TikTok? Hopefully, she won't keep us waiting too long for the answer to that ultimate question.See more at Click's website and @BBCClick.More on this storyAstronaut Samantha Cristoforetti on life in spaceHow Cristoforetti captured world's attention

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Japan News – Japan Inside » News RSS Feed

Japanese Is Developing Unmanned Drones With U.S. To Aid Fighter Jets

Japan plans to develop unmanned drones that can fly to support fighter jets for the government to enhance the defense of its airspace and prevent threats. These drones are expected to be developed in collaboration with the U.S., allowing the two countries to work closer. These drones will be used for faster detecting enemies’ aircraft and missiles. Government officials are also looking into installing missiles on drones to intercept missiles launched by an adversary. The government plans to create an air combat prototypes in fiscal 2025. Then drones in the finished form after fiscal 2026.Drones have been hailed as game-changers, altering the nature of battle in Ukraine. Kyiv’s military has employed drones to target Russian ships that were part of the war. U.S., Europe, China, and other nations have devised advanced strategies that blend uncrewed and manned combat aircraft, rather than relying on the two alone, aiming to increase the range of air force operations. Japan, as well as Europe, China, and the U.S., is hurrying to construct remote drones, believing they will be an integral part of aerial combat. The drones will be outfitted with artificial intelligence (AI) and will fly autonomously ahead of fighter aircraft. The drones will receive commands from pilots or a remote command center and will pass according to the AI’s analysis of the environment and weather conditions. The Japanese Self-Defense Forces already possess drones like those made by the U.S.-Global Hawk, but they’re only for surveillance and not for combat. Currently, the country has not deployed drones that fly alongside fighter jets as per the Defense Ministry. Japanese government is working on a brand new fighter aircraft that will replace the F-2 and is aiming to deploy it in 2035. The drones will assist these new jets. 2035 is the time frame for China’s modernization of its military. Japan is therefore looking to improve its capabilities that let the unmanned and the manned aircraft work together. U.S. military believes China might be preparing to seize Taiwan, the island it claims as its territory, through force in 2027. If this occurs, Japan’s air defense system that relies on drones would not be operational in time. At present, Japan intends to enhance security by conducting joint drills using MQ9 drones that the U.S. military will temporarily deploy in Japan during the summer. The MQ9 drone, which is the drone that the U.S. military uses in Iraq and Syria, can also conduct offensive missions. Drones are a great way to gain an advantage in air-to-air battles. They can also fly into places difficult for fighter aircraft to reach. They will also ease the workload on pilots. Compared to China and other nations, there is a relatively small amount of SDF personnel in Japan. Use AI To Make Decisions Regarding Human Life? Unmanned aircraft operations will be the primary means of aerial warfare in the coming years. The joint development from Japan and the U.S. will make it easier to improve interoperability. The government is expecting Japanese firms to lead the effort so that it is easier to adapt the equipment aid in helping Japan to maintain its defense industry. They are also working with the U.S. to develop a successor to the F-2 fighter jets currently operating. Manned fighter jets cost 10-billion yen ($77 million) each. The cost of flying unmanned is considerably cheaper. Concerning the number of drones to use, one suggestion is to maintain the same number as the F-2 fighters.The world has raised ethical concerns about using AI in decisions that affect people’s lives. In this regard, The Defense Ministry intends to ensure that humans are the sole decision-makers for drones. Japan includes China and Russia as its neighbors, and all are assembling their military. It is becoming increasingly clear from the number of scrambles carried out by the Air Self-Defense Force. In addition, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has raised fears that some countries may attempt to change the current situation in Asia with force. Japan’s decision to develop unmanned drones is a game-changer that will alter the way of battle. It also signals Japan’s need to improve its air defense systems. Source: Nikkei Also read about Japan’s F-15 Jet Crashed Into The Sea And Crew Members Area Still Missing #wpdevar_comment_1 span,#wpdevar_comment_1 iframe{width:100% !important;} #wpdevar_comment_1 iframe{max-height: 100% !important;} Post Views: 2,339

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Animenewsnetwork - All reviews

Fault StP: Lightkravte

The fourth game in Alice in Dissonance's fault series, Fault StP Lightkravte may raise a few eyebrows since it's being released ahead of Milestone Two: Side Below, meaning that series fans have to wait a bit longer to continue the main story. (On Steam, the developers have said that staffing issues are behind the delay of the second Milestone Two game.) But don't let that stop you from picking this up if you enjoy the characters and the series – although the focus is on Khaji, a sort of everyman character, Selphine and Ritona are very much present, and the game taking place in the Kingdom of Rughzenhaide when all was still well is an interesting element of the overall fault mythos. It's also a pretty safe place to enter the franchise – although you won't know who the two aforementioned characters are, the game does a good job of introducing their dynamic and the world in general. There's also a fairly extensive glossary of in-world terminology that can be accessed at any point in the game, while the writing also allows for easy comprehension within the context of what's happening in the story. Part one of a planned two-part prequel spin-off (known collectively as “Silence the Pendant”), Lightkravte is a deceptively low-stakes story. Khaji at first gives off the impression of being somewhat like your average harem protagonist in a shounen series: he's nice, a little bland, and has a definite pervy streak. He lives with his widowed father, who expresses gentle disappointment at his son's disinclination to take over the family farm, but is wonderfully supportive nonetheless – he doesn't love his choices, but he does love his son unconditionally. The Oberg family dynamic thus stands out among the other characters, with some never interacting with their parents, others orphaned, and a strong sense of found family all intertwining throughout the story. This makes it particularly interesting that Khaji, although supported by so many people, doesn't seem to realize it, or even to fully understand what it means to have that support. In this respect he is a very typical teenager, wrapped up in his own wants without being able to truly look outside of himself and see what those wants might mean in the context of something greater than himself. Although Khaji is not a member of the nobility – unlike his friend Flora, Selphine, or Ritona – he has an ineffable air of privilege that he can't quite grasp. If there's a specific theme to the piece, it might be Khaji coming to understand that the world isn't exactly his oyster and that not every shellfish contains a pearl – those are formed through a long process. This doesn't always make him a sympathetic character or the story an easy read; he can get very irritating at times and his naivete and unwillingness to break free from it, while important to the plot, aren't always great to read about. But they do feel like a legitimate issue that he's struggling to first acknowledge and then overcome, and that ultimately does make the game have a story worth reading to the end. It's also beautiful to look at. The backgrounds are the most immediately striking artistic feature of the game. There's a bit of the storybook feel of Mhakna Gramura and Fairy Bell, with exquisite forest scenes and moving glimmers throughout each background. Whether rural or urban, the settings are detailed and compliment the action, and those small moving elements really do add to the overall experience. Speaking of moving, the characters do, too – facial expressions and arms are all animated, albeit in a somewhat limited way. Again, this really does add to the game, especially in sections where there aren't any words; the characters' body language and faces allow the story to avoid the sort of overwriting we can sometimes find in visual novels because we can see what their reactions are. While it can be overdone – the usual “breathing so hard my shoulders are moving constantly” issue that's common to fighting games is present – it ultimately is an enhancement. The music is a little less of a revelation, but it is still the sort of pretty that works to back up the action without being too noticeable, which is something I tend to like in this style of game. As with the other games in the series, Lightkravte's gameplay consists of clicking through dialogue. There are no branching paths or choices at all, so this really is like reading an animated novel. There are Steam achievements for finishing each chapter, as well as one for playing past the point where you can return the game, which I thought was amusing, although I could see it being a slap in the face if you're a slower reader not loving the plot, which does take a bit to really kick in. The only real “extras” with the game are the glossary of in-world terms; no image gallery or music gallery are present, which is a major shame because the event CGs and the art in general are, as I've said, beautiful. The game is available in English, Japanese, and Chinese as of this writing. My playtime was nine hours, which seems to be about average, but as with all VNs, that's very much subject to varying. It may not be Side Below, but Lightkravte is still a very nice entry into the fault series. The story is thoughtful (and has some nice representation of a type we don't often see), the background details to Ritona's and Selphine's lives before the main story are interesting, and the additional animation really does make the game more immersive. Whether you're curious about the franchise or already a fan, this is a nice way to spend some time.

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Animenewsnetwork - Series/volume Review

Fault StP: Lightkravte

The fourth game in Alice in Dissonance's fault series, Fault StP Lightkravte may raise a few eyebrows since it's being released ahead of Milestone Two: Side Below, meaning that series fans have to wait a bit longer to continue the main story. (On Steam, the developers have said that staffing issues are behind the delay of the second Milestone Two game.) But don't let that stop you from picking this up if you enjoy the characters and the series – although the focus is on Khaji, a sort of everyman character, Selphine and Ritona are very much present, and the game taking place in the Kingdom of Rughzenhaide when all was still well is an interesting element of the overall fault mythos. It's also a pretty safe place to enter the franchise – although you won't know who the two aforementioned characters are, the game does a good job of introducing their dynamic and the world in general. There's also a fairly extensive glossary of in-world terminology that can be accessed at any point in the game, while the writing also allows for easy comprehension within the context of what's happening in the story. Part one of a planned two-part prequel spin-off (known collectively as “Silence the Pendant”), Lightkravte is a deceptively low-stakes story. Khaji at first gives off the impression of being somewhat like your average harem protagonist in a shounen series: he's nice, a little bland, and has a definite pervy streak. He lives with his widowed father, who expresses gentle disappointment at his son's disinclination to take over the family farm, but is wonderfully supportive nonetheless – he doesn't love his choices, but he does love his son unconditionally. The Oberg family dynamic thus stands out among the other characters, with some never interacting with their parents, others orphaned, and a strong sense of found family all intertwining throughout the story. This makes it particularly interesting that Khaji, although supported by so many people, doesn't seem to realize it, or even to fully understand what it means to have that support. In this respect he is a very typical teenager, wrapped up in his own wants without being able to truly look outside of himself and see what those wants might mean in the context of something greater than himself. Although Khaji is not a member of the nobility – unlike his friend Flora, Selphine, or Ritona – he has an ineffable air of privilege that he can't quite grasp. If there's a specific theme to the piece, it might be Khaji coming to understand that the world isn't exactly his oyster and that not every shellfish contains a pearl – those are formed through a long process. This doesn't always make him a sympathetic character or the story an easy read; he can get very irritating at times and his naivete and unwillingness to break free from it, while important to the plot, aren't always great to read about. But they do feel like a legitimate issue that he's struggling to first acknowledge and then overcome, and that ultimately does make the game have a story worth reading to the end. It's also beautiful to look at. The backgrounds are the most immediately striking artistic feature of the game. There's a bit of the storybook feel of Mhakna Gramura and Fairy Bell, with exquisite forest scenes and moving glimmers throughout each background. Whether rural or urban, the settings are detailed and compliment the action, and those small moving elements really do add to the overall experience. Speaking of moving, the characters do, too – facial expressions and arms are all animated, albeit in a somewhat limited way. Again, this really does add to the game, especially in sections where there aren't any words; the characters' body language and faces allow the story to avoid the sort of overwriting we can sometimes find in visual novels because we can see what their reactions are. While it can be overdone – the usual “breathing so hard my shoulders are moving constantly” issue that's common to fighting games is present – it ultimately is an enhancement. The music is a little less of a revelation, but it is still the sort of pretty that works to back up the action without being too noticeable, which is something I tend to like in this style of game. As with the other games in the series, Lightkravte's gameplay consists of clicking through dialogue. There are no branching paths or choices at all, so this really is like reading an animated novel. There are Steam achievements for finishing each chapter, as well as one for playing past the point where you can return the game, which I thought was amusing, although I could see it being a slap in the face if you're a slower reader not loving the plot, which does take a bit to really kick in. The only real “extras” with the game are the glossary of in-world terms; no image gallery or music gallery are present, which is a major shame because the event CGs and the art in general are, as I've said, beautiful. The game is available in English, Japanese, and Chinese as of this writing. My playtime was nine hours, which seems to be about average, but as with all VNs, that's very much subject to varying. It may not be Side Below, but Lightkravte is still a very nice entry into the fault series. The story is thoughtful (and has some nice representation of a type we don't often see), the background details to Ritona's and Selphine's lives before the main story are interesting, and the additional animation really does make the game more immersive. Whether you're curious about the franchise or already a fan, this is a nice way to spend some time.

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Animenewsnetwork - Views

Fault StP: Lightkravte

The fourth game in Alice in Dissonance's fault series, Fault StP Lightkravte may raise a few eyebrows since it's being released ahead of Milestone Two: Side Below, meaning that series fans have to wait a bit longer to continue the main story. (On Steam, the developers have said that staffing issues are behind the delay of the second Milestone Two game.) But don't let that stop you from picking this up if you enjoy the characters and the series – although the focus is on Khaji, a sort of everyman character, Selphine and Ritona are very much present, and the game taking place in the Kingdom of Rughzenhaide when all was still well is an interesting element of the overall fault mythos. It's also a pretty safe place to enter the franchise – although you won't know who the two aforementioned characters are, the game does a good job of introducing their dynamic and the world in general. There's also a fairly extensive glossary of in-world terminology that can be accessed at any point in the game, while the writing also allows for easy comprehension within the context of what's happening in the story. Part one of a planned two-part prequel spin-off (known collectively as “Silence the Pendant”), Lightkravte is a deceptively low-stakes story. Khaji at first gives off the impression of being somewhat like your average harem protagonist in a shounen series: he's nice, a little bland, and has a definite pervy streak. He lives with his widowed father, who expresses gentle disappointment at his son's disinclination to take over the family farm, but is wonderfully supportive nonetheless – he doesn't love his choices, but he does love his son unconditionally. The Oberg family dynamic thus stands out among the other characters, with some never interacting with their parents, others orphaned, and a strong sense of found family all intertwining throughout the story. This makes it particularly interesting that Khaji, although supported by so many people, doesn't seem to realize it, or even to fully understand what it means to have that support. In this respect he is a very typical teenager, wrapped up in his own wants without being able to truly look outside of himself and see what those wants might mean in the context of something greater than himself. Although Khaji is not a member of the nobility – unlike his friend Flora, Selphine, or Ritona – he has an ineffable air of privilege that he can't quite grasp. If there's a specific theme to the piece, it might be Khaji coming to understand that the world isn't exactly his oyster and that not every shellfish contains a pearl – those are formed through a long process. This doesn't always make him a sympathetic character or the story an easy read; he can get very irritating at times and his naivete and unwillingness to break free from it, while important to the plot, aren't always great to read about. But they do feel like a legitimate issue that he's struggling to first acknowledge and then overcome, and that ultimately does make the game have a story worth reading to the end. It's also beautiful to look at. The backgrounds are the most immediately striking artistic feature of the game. There's a bit of the storybook feel of Mhakna Gramura and Fairy Bell, with exquisite forest scenes and moving glimmers throughout each background. Whether rural or urban, the settings are detailed and compliment the action, and those small moving elements really do add to the overall experience. Speaking of moving, the characters do, too – facial expressions and arms are all animated, albeit in a somewhat limited way. Again, this really does add to the game, especially in sections where there aren't any words; the characters' body language and faces allow the story to avoid the sort of overwriting we can sometimes find in visual novels because we can see what their reactions are. While it can be overdone – the usual “breathing so hard my shoulders are moving constantly” issue that's common to fighting games is present – it ultimately is an enhancement. The music is a little less of a revelation, but it is still the sort of pretty that works to back up the action without being too noticeable, which is something I tend to like in this style of game. As with the other games in the series, Lightkravte's gameplay consists of clicking through dialogue. There are no branching paths or choices at all, so this really is like reading an animated novel. There are Steam achievements for finishing each chapter, as well as one for playing past the point where you can return the game, which I thought was amusing, although I could see it being a slap in the face if you're a slower reader not loving the plot, which does take a bit to really kick in. The only real “extras” with the game are the glossary of in-world terms; no image gallery or music gallery are present, which is a major shame because the event CGs and the art in general are, as I've said, beautiful. The game is available in English, Japanese, and Chinese as of this writing. My playtime was nine hours, which seems to be about average, but as with all VNs, that's very much subject to varying. It may not be Side Below, but Lightkravte is still a very nice entry into the fault series. The story is thoughtful (and has some nice representation of a type we don't often see), the background details to Ritona's and Selphine's lives before the main story are interesting, and the additional animation really does make the game more immersive. Whether you're curious about the franchise or already a fan, this is a nice way to spend some time.

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UK News - Wired UK RSS Feed

How China Hacked US Phone Networks

How do you smuggle information into the USSR right under the nose of the KGB? Create your own encryption system, of course. That’s exactly what saxophonist and music professor Merryl Goldberg did during the 1980s. This week Goldberg revealed that she used musical notation to hide the names and addresses of activists and details of meetings on a rare trip to the Soviet Union. To do so, she cooked up her own encryption system. Each musical note and marking represented letters of the alphabet and helped disguise the sensitive information. When Soviet officers inspected the documents, no suspicions were raised.Goldberg’s story was retold at the RSA Conference in San Francisco this week, where WIRED’s Lily Newman has been digging up stories. Also coming out of RSA: a warning that as ransomware becomes less profitable, attackers may turn to business email compromise (BEC) scams to make money—BEC attacks are already highly profitable.Also this week, dark-web marketplace AlphaBay is about to complete its journey back to the top of the online underworld. The original AlphaBay site—home to more than 350,000 product listings, ranging from drugs to cybercrime services—was purged from the dark web in July 2017 as part of a huge law enforcement operation. However, AlphaBay’s second-in-command, an actor going by the name of DeSnake, survived the law enforcement operation and relaunched the site last year. Now AlphaBay is growing quickly and is on the verge of resuming its dominant dark-web market position.Elsewhere, Apple held its annual Worldwide Developers Conference this week and revealed iOS 16, macOS Ventura and some new MacBooks—WIRED’s Gear team has you covered on everything Apple announced at WWDC. However, there are two standout new security features worth mentioning: Apple is replacing passwords with new cryptographic passkeys, and it’s introducing a safety check feature to help people in abusive relationships. Database firm MongoDB also held its own event this week, and while it might not have been as high-profile as WWDC, MongoDB’s new Queryable Encryption tool may be a key defense against preventing data leaks.Also this week we’ve reported on a Tesla flaw that lets anyone create their own NFC car key. New research from the ​​Mozilla Foundation has found that disinformation and hate speech are flooding TikTok ahead of Kenya’s elections, which take place at the start of August. Elon Musk reportedly gained access to Twitter’s “fire hose,” raising privacy concerns. And we dove into the shocking new evidence televised by the House January 6 committee.But that's not all, folks. Each week we round up the big security and privacy news we didn't cover ourselves. Click the links for the full stories, and stay safe out there.For the past two years, state-sponsored hackers working on behalf of the Chinese government have targeted scores of communications technologies, ranging from home routers to large telecom networks. That’s according to the NSA, FBI, and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), which published a security advisory this week detailing the “widespread” hacking.Since 2020, Chinese-backed actors have been exploiting publicly known software flaws in hardware and incorporating compromised devices into their own attack infrastructure. According to the US agencies, the attacks typically contained five steps. China’s hackers would use publicly available tools to scan for vulnerabilities in networks. They would then gain initial access through online services, access login details from the systems, get access to routers and copy network traffic, before finally “exfiltrating” victim data.“Exploiting these vulnerabilities has allowed them to establish broad infrastructure networks to exploit a wide range of public- and private-sector targets,” the agencies say in their joint advisory.Since the start of the war in Ukraine, Russia has been hacked at an unprecedented scale. Now, more than 100 days into the war, tensions around cyber activity are rising. On June 9, Russia’s Foreign Ministry said that its critical infrastructure and government bodies were being hit by cyberattacks and warned that it could lead to military confrontation with the West. “The militarization of the information space by the West, and attempts to turn it into an arena of interstate confrontation, have greatly increased the threat of a direct military clash with unpredictable consequences,” the Foreign Ministry said in a statement. From the moment Russian troops entered Ukraine, questions have been raised about the potential for escalation if people outside of Ukraine are involved in cyberattacks against Russia. Last week, the head of US Cyber Command told Sky News that its military hackers have been involved in offensive operations that support Ukraine.Phishing remains one of the most successful ways for criminals to break into people’s accounts and make money—and there’s no better example of this than a newly uncovered Facebook and Facebook Messenger phishing campaign. This week, security researchers at US firm PIXM revealed a huge network of at least 400 phishing pages that are raking in millions of views and have made its creators an estimated $59 million. The scam, which has been running since at least September 2021, directs people to false Facebook login pages where their credentials are hoovered up. What stands out, as noted by the Register, is that the phishing campaign has managed to avoid Facebook’s phishing detection methods more effectively than others.So far in 2022, police and tech companies have been cracking down on cybercriminals with some success: Raidforums, ZLoader, and the dark-web market Hydra have all been shut down in recent months. That list got a little bit longer this week as the FBI and its international law enforcement took down a marketplace selling the personal information of around 24 million Americans, according to authorities. The SSNDOB marketplace, which was made up of four individual domains, was selling people’s names, dates of birth, and Social Security numbers. SSNDOB has existed for around a decade, and in 2013, details obtained from the organization were used in the takeover of Xbox Live accounts. It’s believed the website has made its unknown owners around $22 million since 2015.More Great WIRED Stories

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