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Day: 21 June 2022

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Man Caught on Camera Urinating on Pride Flag Outside Norton Home

Police in Norton, Massachusetts, are investigating after a man was caught on camera urinating on a pride flag outside a home. Throughout the town, you'll find signs representing LGBTQ rights. They can be seen in front of churches, the library and the police department. "It's been so great to see how many people have one of these signs and have put them up," said Val Cabral. "Feeling supported makes such a difference, and I feel like that's why it was really important to be very visible with it this year." Cabral has one of the signs sitting underneath the American flag at the end of her driveway on Mansfield Avenue, but after it went missing earlier this month, they decided to put up a bigger one. "A few more went missing from businesses nearby, so we built a larger one that you can't just pull out of the ground," Cabral said. When a smaller sign disappeared a second time, they checked the video on their trail camera, finding video of a man who police say appears to be urinating on the larger flag. "I felt kind of sad, I felt kind of violated, honestly," Cabral said. "We worried that something like that might happen, obviously, that's why we put the trail camera up, but we thought maybe graffiti, not going so far as to, you know, to pee on it." Police say the timestamp on the video shows it happened around 12:20 a.m. June 14, adding that they are now investigating the incident.

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UK News - NECN RSS Feed

Man Caught on Camera Urinating on Pride Flag Outside Norton Home

Police in Norton, Massachusetts, are investigating after a man was caught on camera urinating on a pride flag outside a home. Throughout the town, you'll find signs representing LGBTQ rights. They can be seen in front of churches, the library and the police department. "It's been so great to see how many people have one of these signs and have put them up," said Val Cabral. "Feeling supported makes such a difference, and I feel like that's why it was really important to be very visible with it this year." Cabral has one of the signs sitting underneath the American flag at the end of her driveway on Mansfield Avenue, but after it went missing earlier this month, they decided to put up a bigger one. "A few more went missing from businesses nearby, so we built a larger one that you can't just pull out of the ground," Cabral said. When a smaller sign disappeared a second time, they checked the video on their trail camera, finding video of a man who police say appears to be urinating on the larger flag. "I felt kind of sad, I felt kind of violated, honestly," Cabral said. "We worried that something like that might happen, obviously, that's why we put the trail camera up, but we thought maybe graffiti, not going so far as to, you know, to pee on it." Police say the timestamp on the video shows it happened around 12:20 a.m. June 14, adding that they are now investigating the incident.

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UK News - NECN RSS Feed

Man Caught on Camera Urinating on Pride Flag Outside Norton Home

Police in Norton, Massachusetts, are investigating after a man was caught on camera urinating on a pride flag outside a home. Throughout the town, you'll find signs representing LGBTQ rights. They can be seen in front of churches, the library and the police department. "It's been so great to see how many people have one of these signs and have put them up," said Val Cabral. "Feeling supported makes such a difference, and I feel like that's why it was really important to be very visible with it this year." Cabral has one of the signs sitting underneath the American flag at the end of her driveway on Mansfield Avenue, but after it went missing earlier this month, they decided to put up a bigger one. "A few more went missing from businesses nearby, so we built a larger one that you can't just pull out of the ground," Cabral said. When a smaller sign disappeared a second time, they checked the video on their trail camera, finding video of a man who police say appears to be urinating on the larger flag. "I felt kind of sad, I felt kind of violated, honestly," Cabral said. "We worried that something like that might happen, obviously, that's why we put the trail camera up, but we thought maybe graffiti, not going so far as to, you know, to pee on it." Police say the timestamp on the video shows it happened around 12:20 a.m. June 14, adding that they are now investigating the incident.

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Japan Today

Most land mine use by U.S. military banned, except for Korea

President Joe Biden's administration announced Tuesday that it would restrict the use of anti-personnel land mines by the U.S. military, aligning the country's policy more closely with an international treaty banning the deadly explosives. The announcement reverses a more permissive stance by then-President Donald Trump, and it concludes a review that has lasted for more than a year. Bonnie Jenkins, the State Department's undersecretary for arms control and international security, said the new policy fulfills “a commitment that President Biden made as a candidate," when he described Trump's decision as “reckless.” Anti-personnel land mines are buried underground or scattered on the surface, and they can pose a lethal threat to civilians long after combat has ended. Under the new policy, the U.S. will restrict the use of these explosives outside of its efforts to help defend South Korea from a potential North Korean invasion. Although the U.S. does not currently have any minefields deployed there, Washington has pledged support for Seoul's defense, which includes anti-personnel mines. The U.S. has a stockpile of 3 million anti-personnel land mines. Under the new policy, any that aren't needed to protect South Korea will be destroyed. The Pentagon did not immediately respond to a question about whether any will be discarded. The exception regarding the Korean Peninsula, which was also in place during President Barack Obama's administration, leaves the U.S. short of full compliance with the Ottawa Convention, the 1997 treaty intended to eliminate anti-personnel land mines. The announcement comes as Russia deploys such mines during its invasion of Ukraine. “The world has once again witnessed the devastating impact that anti-personnel landmines can have in the context of Russia’s brutal and unprovoked war in Ukraine, where Russian forces’ use of these and other munitions have caused extensive harm to civilians and civilian objects,” National Security Council spokeswoman Adrienne Watson said in a statement. © Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Japan Today

Civil jury finds Bill Cosby sexually abused teenager in 1975

Jurors at a civil trial found Tuesday that Bill Cosby sexually abused a 16-year-old girl at the Playboy Mansion in 1975. The Los Angeles County jury delivered the verdict in favor of Judy Huth, who is now 64, and awarded her $500,000. Jurors found that Cosby intentionally caused harmful sexual contact with Huth, that he reasonably believed she was under 18, and that his conduct was driven by unnatural or abnormal sexual interest in a minor. The jurors’ decision is a major legal defeat for the 84-year-old entertainer once hailed as America’s dad. It comes nearly a year after his Pennsylvania criminal conviction for sexual assault was thrown out and he was freed from prison. Huth’s lawsuit was one of the last remaining legal claims against him after his insurer settled many others against his will. Cosby did not attend the trial or testify in person, but short clips from 2015 video deposition were played for jurors, in which he denied any sexual contact with Huth. He continues to deny the allegation through his attorney and publicist. Jurors had already reached conclusions on nearly every question on their verdict form, including whether Cosby abused Huth and whether she deserved damages, after two days of deliberations on Friday. But the jury foreperson could not serve further because of a personal commitment, and the panel had to start deliberating from scratch with an alternate juror on Monday. Cosby’s attorneys agreed that Cosby met Huth and her high school friend on a Southern California film set in April of 1975, then took them to the Playboy Mansion a few days later. Huth’s friend Donna Samuelson, a key witness, took photos at the mansion of Huth and Cosby, which loomed large at the trial. Huth testified that in a bedroom adjacent to a game room where the three had been hanging out, Cosby attempted to put his hand down her pants, then exposed himself and forced her to perform a sex act. Huth filed her lawsuit in 2014, saying that her son turning 15 — the age she initially remembered being when she went to the mansion — and a wave of other women accusing Cosby of similar acts brought fresh trauma over what she had been through as a teenager. Huth’s attorney Nathan Goldberg told the jury of nine women and three men during closing arguments Wednesday that “my client deserves to have Mr. Cosby held accountable for what he did.” “Each of you knows in your heart that Mr. Cosby sexually assaulted Miss Huth,” Goldberg said. A majority of jurors apparently agreed, giving Huth a victory in a suit that took eight years and overcame many hurdles just to get to trial. During their testimony, Cosby attorney Jennifer Bonjean consistently challenged Huth and Samuelson over errors in detail in their stories, and a similarity in the accounts that the lawyer said represented coordination between the two women. This included the women saying in pre-trial depositions and police interviews that Samuelson had played Donkey Kong that day, a game not released until six years later. Bonjean made much of this, in what both sides came to call the “Donkey Kong defense.” Goldberg asked jurors to look past the small errors in detail that he said were inevitable in stories that were 45 years old, and focus on the major issues behind the allegations. He pointed out to jurors that Samuelson said “games like Donkey Kong” when she first mentioned it in her deposition. The Cosby lawyer began her closing arguments by saying, “It’s on like Donkey Kong,” and finished by declaring, “game over.” Huth’s attorney reacted with outrage during his rebuttal. “This is about justice!” he shouted, pounding on the podium. “We don’t need game over! We need justice!” © Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Asahi Shimbun Digital

日本製鉄の敷地から脱硫液が流出 付近で魚が大量死、原因を調査へ

 日本製鉄東日本製鉄所君津地区(千葉県君津市)から、生産工程で生じる「脱硫液」が敷地外に漏れ出し、水路を経て近くの小糸川に流入していたことがわかった。県は日鉄に対して、水質汚濁防止法に基づいて原因究明などを行政指導し、周辺の環境への影響などを調べている。 市消防本部などによると、19日正午過ぎ、付近住民から「川の水が赤い。魚が死んでいる」と通報があった。その後日鉄から市に「設備のトラブルで通常、排出しないものが排水口から出た」と連絡があった。 県水質保全課によると、コークス炉で発生したガスの洗浄で生じる脱硫液のタンクに穴が開き、約3千立方メートルの液が敷地内に漏れた。さらに排水口から敷地外の水路に流れたとみられる。液にはチオシアン酸アンモニウムと呼ばれる物質が含まれるという。 21日、現場の水路は赤褐色…この記事は有料会員記事です。残り262文字有料会員になると続きをお読みいただけます。

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Japan Today

Women's PGA Championship doubles prize money to $9 million

The KPMG Women’s PGA Championship is doubling the size of its purse to $9 million, another boost to the women’s game that brings prize money for the five majors to nearly triple the amount from a decade ago. The purse for the LPGA Tour’s second-oldest major is now 300% higher than it was in 2014, the year before KPMG and the PGA of America partnered with the LPGA Tour to raise the prize money and the profile by taking it to fabled courses. The Women’s PGA Championship starts Thursday at Congressional Country Club, which has hosted the U.S. Open three times. The winner will get $1.35 million. The USGA signed up a presenting sponsor (ProMedica) for the U.S. Women's Open in nearly doubling the prize money from what already was the largest of the LPGA majors. Minjee Lee won $1.8 million from a $10 million purse earlier this month at Pine Needles. The Amundia Evian Championship in France already announced a $2 million increase to $6.8 million, while the AIG Women’s British Open has seen steady increases with a new title sponsor and now is up to $6.8 million. The Chevron Championship had a $5 million purse, nearly $2 million more than the previous year. That brings prize money for the five majors to $37.3 million. In 2012, the same five tournaments had combined prize money of $13.75 million. All but the U.S. Women’s Open have corporate sponsors as part of the title. “We are accelerating the advancement, development and empowerment of women both on and off the golf course,” said Paul Knopp, the U.S. chairman and CEO of KPMG. “The significantly increased purse size — along with top courses in major markets, network TV coverage, and advanced data and analytics capabilities provided via KPMG Performance Insights — are tangible examples of our commitment to elevate the world-class athletes on the LPGA Tour.” KPMG Performance Insights was launched last year to give the women a trove of statistics to help advance their games. LPGA Tour Commissioner Mollie Marcoux Samaan delivered the news to her players in an email Tuesday morning, and it got plenty of attention. “You heard a murmur kind of going around the clubhouse. ‘Hey, did you see that email, 9 mil.’ And everybody is super, super excited,” Mariah Stackhouse said. “It’s awesome being a KPMG ambassador to see us joining that push for increasing and elevating women’s golf, and it’s been done with this championship in terms of the competition ever since KPMG has taken over. So to see the purse rise too, it’s just really cementing this as ... one of the premier, if not the premier major in women’s golf.” Since KPMG became a sponsor, the Women’s PGA has gone to Hazeltine and Olympia Fields, Aronimink and Sahalee, all courses that have hosted men’s majors. Nelly Korda is the defending champion, winning last year at Atlanta Athletic Club to reach No. 1 for the first time. The field features 99 of the top 100 players on the LPGA Tour’s money list. “This is a very big day for the LPGA, for women’s golf and for women’s sports,” Marcoux Samaan said. “And we look forward to working with KPMG and the PGA of America to continue to use our platform to empower young women and inspire positive change in the world.” © Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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BBC News

Just Stop Oil: Activists says they have 'a duty to protest'

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty Images"I found myself feeling just so completely and utterly helpless, and realised I had to take action."Claudia Penna Rojas became a part of climate activist group Just Stop Oil in February.You might know them for their protest actions which have included tying themselves to football goalposts, climbing on oil tankers and stopping traffic."I was aware of global warming as an issue, but the urgency of the situation has sunk in," 24-year-old Claudia tells Radio 1 Newsbeat.Many of the impacts of global warming are now simply "irreversible", according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, with their scientific reports being described as "a code red for humanity" by the UN Secretary General António Guterres.Image source, ClaudiaJust Stop Oil describe themselves as a "coalition of groups working together" to demand the government stop the exploration, development and production of fossil fuels - like oil, gas and coal - in the UK.It has divided opinion, with some criticising their disruptive tactics and others praising them for raising attention. Methods such as strikes, boycotts and mass protests - often used by climate protest groups to make their point - have been criticised for being extreme, "selfish" and creating too much disruption to people's lives. Members of the group have broken the law and been arrested for offences such as criminal damage.Some politicians have condemned the group's tactics for causing lives to be "brought to a standstill".Newsbeat has been finding out more from the individuals involved in the group.'It feels like a duty'Claudia moved to the UK aged eight, from Chile, where most of her family still live. She says Chile has faced "mega droughts" for many years, and believes it's a result of climate change."People don't have access to water and I'm terrified that within the next few years, my family could be struggling to survive.""Now's the time where we have to give it absolutely everything. It doesn't really feel like a choice, it feels like a duty."She hoped one day to have a family of her own, but doesn't think that'll happen because of the climate crisis, saying it "feels unfair" to bring a child into "this world".Why protesters are tying themselves to goalpostsProtesters breach oil terminal injunctionA really simple guide to climate change For Zak, he was living "a normal child's life', when he started to see "there was injustice in the world" from the age of 12."I thought what I've been doing for the past two years in the animal rights movement, it's not achieved much change," the 15-year-old says."I was looking to get involved in action, which is going to create change."Image source, ZakZak joined the group after being inspired by the Insulate Britain campaign, who were known for gluing themselves to the motorway and stopping traffic.Xanthe Flynn, who uses the pronouns they/them, says they don't like to "call it activism because it's my whole life". "It's not just a protest that you go and do, and then you go back to your safe space," the 18-year-old says."It's also been a massive learning space. Because I didn't get taught really about this in school." 'Bodies on the line'Zak and Xanthe have both been arrested as a result of their actions."I sat on top of an oil tanker for about six, seven hours before I was arrested," Zak says.Zak says being held by police "isn't the nicest thing" but is "incomparable to the consequences of climate change". "Being arrested is not something any of us want to do, it's quite scary," Xanthe adds.Image source, XantheAs for the impact on their futures of having a police record, both are concerned, but "it's not the most important thing" Xanthe says."I'll explain to future employers why I was arrested. And if they don't understand I think it'll be very hard to be in that job.""Would I really want to be employed by someone who judges me for getting arrested for doing something which is quite literally an act of love?," Zak adds.But are there other, less disruptive ways to get their message across?Claudia says they don't "want to cause disruption" and adds their tactics are "not something they choose to do for fun".After years of petitions and words, she adds "we're out of time"."What other options are we left with, apart from to put our bodies on the line," says Zak.Image source, ClaudiaThere has been criticism of the group for being "middle-class, privileged" young people, but Claudia says: "If you have the privilege of being able to take that risk, then you have a duty to do so".Zak, though, says he has encountered people from lots of different backgrounds in the group."They take time off work, some of them potentially risk their jobs.""I don't think it's a case of everyone being a trust fund kid whose lifestyles are funded by parents. "I think it's a case of people caring about the future generations." Image source, Just Stop Oil/ PA MediaXanthe is happy to use their privilege of "being white and born in Oxford"."I can do that because I know that I might not get treated as badly, so the consequences won't be so bad." "We can use our privilege. Because a lot of people can't." Despite feeling worried about the current situation, Claudia, Zak and Xanthe are united in still optimistic things can improve."I think that we need to have hope to continue and hope that something will change," Xanthe adds.Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.Listen to Newsbeat live at 12:45 and 17:45 weekdays - or listen back here. More on this storyProtesters breach oil terminal injunctionWhy protesters are tying themselves to goalpostsA really simple guide to climate change

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BBC News

Just Stop Oil: Activists says they have 'a duty to protest'

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty Images"I found myself feeling just so completely and utterly helpless, and realised I had to take action."Claudia Penna Rojas became a part of climate activist group Just Stop Oil in February.You might know them for their protest actions which have included tying themselves to football goalposts, climbing on oil tankers and stopping traffic."I was aware of global warming as an issue, but the urgency of the situation has sunk in," 24-year-old Claudia tells Radio 1 Newsbeat.Many of the impacts of global warming are now simply "irreversible", according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, with their scientific reports being described as "a code red for humanity" by the UN Secretary General António Guterres.Image source, ClaudiaJust Stop Oil describe themselves as a "coalition of groups working together" to demand the government stop the exploration, development and production of fossil fuels - like oil, gas and coal - in the UK.It has divided opinion, with some criticising their disruptive tactics and others praising them for raising attention. Methods such as strikes, boycotts and mass protests - often used by climate protest groups to make their point - have been criticised for being extreme, "selfish" and creating too much disruption to people's lives. Members of the group have broken the law and been arrested for offences such as criminal damage.Some politicians have condemned the group's tactics for causing lives to be "brought to a standstill".Newsbeat has been finding out more from the individuals involved in the group.'It feels like a duty'Claudia moved to the UK aged eight, from Chile, where most of her family still live. She says Chile has faced "mega droughts" for many years, and believes it's a result of climate change."People don't have access to water and I'm terrified that within the next few years, my family could be struggling to survive.""Now's the time where we have to give it absolutely everything. It doesn't really feel like a choice, it feels like a duty."She hoped one day to have a family of her own, but doesn't think that'll happen because of the climate crisis, saying it "feels unfair" to bring a child into "this world".Why protesters are tying themselves to goalpostsProtesters breach oil terminal injunctionA really simple guide to climate change For Zak, he was living "a normal child's life', when he started to see "there was injustice in the world" from the age of 12."I thought what I've been doing for the past two years in the animal rights movement, it's not achieved much change," the 15-year-old says."I was looking to get involved in action, which is going to create change."Image source, ZakZak joined the group after being inspired by the Insulate Britain campaign, who were known for gluing themselves to the motorway and stopping traffic.Xanthe Flynn, who uses the pronouns they/them, says they don't like to "call it activism because it's my whole life". "It's not just a protest that you go and do, and then you go back to your safe space," the 18-year-old says."It's also been a massive learning space. Because I didn't get taught really about this in school." 'Bodies on the line'Zak and Xanthe have both been arrested as a result of their actions."I sat on top of an oil tanker for about six, seven hours before I was arrested," Zak says.Zak says being held by police "isn't the nicest thing" but is "incomparable to the consequences of climate change". "Being arrested is not something any of us want to do, it's quite scary," Xanthe adds.Image source, XantheAs for the impact on their futures of having a police record, both are concerned, but "it's not the most important thing" Xanthe says."I'll explain to future employers why I was arrested. And if they don't understand I think it'll be very hard to be in that job.""Would I really want to be employed by someone who judges me for getting arrested for doing something which is quite literally an act of love?," Zak adds.But are there other, less disruptive ways to get their message across?Claudia says they don't "want to cause disruption" and adds their tactics are "not something they choose to do for fun".After years of petitions and words, she adds "we're out of time"."What other options are we left with, apart from to put our bodies on the line," says Zak.Image source, ClaudiaThere has been criticism of the group for being "middle-class, privileged" young people, but Claudia says: "If you have the privilege of being able to take that risk, then you have a duty to do so".Zak, though, says he has encountered people from lots of different backgrounds in the group."They take time off work, some of them potentially risk their jobs.""I don't think it's a case of everyone being a trust fund kid whose lifestyles are funded by parents. "I think it's a case of people caring about the future generations." Image source, Just Stop Oil/ PA MediaXanthe is happy to use their privilege of "being white and born in Oxford"."I can do that because I know that I might not get treated as badly, so the consequences won't be so bad." "We can use our privilege. Because a lot of people can't." Despite feeling worried about the current situation, Claudia, Zak and Xanthe are united in still optimistic things can improve."I think that we need to have hope to continue and hope that something will change," Xanthe adds.Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.Listen to Newsbeat live at 12:45 and 17:45 weekdays - or listen back here. More on this storyProtesters breach oil terminal injunctionWhy protesters are tying themselves to goalpostsA really simple guide to climate change

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BBC News

Just Stop Oil: Activists says they have 'a duty to protest'

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty Images"I found myself feeling just so completely and utterly helpless, and realised I had to take action."Claudia Penna Rojas became a part of climate activist group Just Stop Oil in February.You might know them for their protest actions which have included tying themselves to football goalposts, climbing on oil tankers and stopping traffic."I was aware of global warming as an issue, but the urgency of the situation has sunk in," 24-year-old Claudia tells Radio 1 Newsbeat.Many of the impacts of global warming are now simply "irreversible", according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, with their scientific reports being described as "a code red for humanity" by the UN Secretary General António Guterres.Image source, ClaudiaJust Stop Oil describe themselves as a "coalition of groups working together" to demand the government stop the exploration, development and production of fossil fuels - like oil, gas and coal - in the UK.It has divided opinion, with some criticising their disruptive tactics and others praising them for raising attention. Methods such as strikes, boycotts and mass protests - often used by climate protest groups to make their point - have been criticised for being extreme, "selfish" and creating too much disruption to people's lives. Members of the group have broken the law and been arrested for offences such as criminal damage.Some politicians have condemned the group's tactics for causing lives to be "brought to a standstill".Newsbeat has been finding out more from the individuals involved in the group.'It feels like a duty'Claudia moved to the UK aged eight, from Chile, where most of her family still live. She says Chile has faced "mega droughts" for many years, and believes it's a result of climate change."People don't have access to water and I'm terrified that within the next few years, my family could be struggling to survive.""Now's the time where we have to give it absolutely everything. It doesn't really feel like a choice, it feels like a duty."She hoped one day to have a family of her own, but doesn't think that'll happen because of the climate crisis, saying it "feels unfair" to bring a child into "this world".Why protesters are tying themselves to goalpostsProtesters breach oil terminal injunctionA really simple guide to climate change For Zak, he was living "a normal child's life', when he started to see "there was injustice in the world" from the age of 12."I thought what I've been doing for the past two years in the animal rights movement, it's not achieved much change," the 15-year-old says."I was looking to get involved in action, which is going to create change."Image source, ZakZak joined the group after being inspired by the Insulate Britain campaign, who were known for gluing themselves to the motorway and stopping traffic.Xanthe Flynn, who uses the pronouns they/them, says they don't like to "call it activism because it's my whole life". "It's not just a protest that you go and do, and then you go back to your safe space," the 18-year-old says."It's also been a massive learning space. Because I didn't get taught really about this in school." 'Bodies on the line'Zak and Xanthe have both been arrested as a result of their actions."I sat on top of an oil tanker for about six, seven hours before I was arrested," Zak says.Zak says being held by police "isn't the nicest thing" but is "incomparable to the consequences of climate change". "Being arrested is not something any of us want to do, it's quite scary," Xanthe adds.Image source, XantheAs for the impact on their futures of having a police record, both are concerned, but "it's not the most important thing" Xanthe says."I'll explain to future employers why I was arrested. And if they don't understand I think it'll be very hard to be in that job.""Would I really want to be employed by someone who judges me for getting arrested for doing something which is quite literally an act of love?," Zak adds.But are there other, less disruptive ways to get their message across?Claudia says they don't "want to cause disruption" and adds their tactics are "not something they choose to do for fun".After years of petitions and words, she adds "we're out of time"."What other options are we left with, apart from to put our bodies on the line," says Zak.Image source, ClaudiaThere has been criticism of the group for being "middle-class, privileged" young people, but Claudia says: "If you have the privilege of being able to take that risk, then you have a duty to do so".Zak, though, says he has encountered people from lots of different backgrounds in the group."They take time off work, some of them potentially risk their jobs.""I don't think it's a case of everyone being a trust fund kid whose lifestyles are funded by parents. "I think it's a case of people caring about the future generations." Image source, Just Stop Oil/ PA MediaXanthe is happy to use their privilege of "being white and born in Oxford"."I can do that because I know that I might not get treated as badly, so the consequences won't be so bad." "We can use our privilege. Because a lot of people can't." Despite feeling worried about the current situation, Claudia, Zak and Xanthe are united in still optimistic things can improve."I think that we need to have hope to continue and hope that something will change," Xanthe adds.Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.Listen to Newsbeat live at 12:45 and 17:45 weekdays - or listen back here. More on this storyProtesters breach oil terminal injunctionWhy protesters are tying themselves to goalpostsA really simple guide to climate change

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BBC News – UK RSS Feed – World News

Just Stop Oil: Activists says they have 'a duty to protest'

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty Images"I found myself feeling just so completely and utterly helpless, and realised I had to take action."Claudia Penna Rojas became a part of climate activist group Just Stop Oil in February.You might know them for their protest actions which have included tying themselves to football goalposts, climbing on oil tankers and stopping traffic."I was aware of global warming as an issue, but the urgency of the situation has sunk in," 24-year-old Claudia tells Radio 1 Newsbeat.Many of the impacts of global warming are now simply "irreversible", according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, with their scientific reports being described as "a code red for humanity" by the UN Secretary General António Guterres.Image source, ClaudiaJust Stop Oil describe themselves as a "coalition of groups working together" to demand the government stop the exploration, development and production of fossil fuels - like oil, gas and coal - in the UK.It has divided opinion, with some criticising their disruptive tactics and others praising them for raising attention. Methods such as strikes, boycotts and mass protests - often used by climate protest groups to make their point - have been criticised for being extreme, "selfish" and creating too much disruption to people's lives. Members of the group have broken the law and been arrested for offences such as criminal damage.Some politicians have condemned the group's tactics for causing lives to be "brought to a standstill".Newsbeat has been finding out more from the individuals involved in the group.'It feels like a duty'Claudia moved to the UK aged eight, from Chile, where most of her family still live. She says Chile has faced "mega droughts" for many years, and believes it's a result of climate change."People don't have access to water and I'm terrified that within the next few years, my family could be struggling to survive.""Now's the time where we have to give it absolutely everything. It doesn't really feel like a choice, it feels like a duty."She hoped one day to have a family of her own, but doesn't think that'll happen because of the climate crisis, saying it "feels unfair" to bring a child into "this world".Why protesters are tying themselves to goalpostsProtesters breach oil terminal injunctionA really simple guide to climate change For Zak, he was living "a normal child's life', when he started to see "there was injustice in the world" from the age of 12."I thought what I've been doing for the past two years in the animal rights movement, it's not achieved much change," the 15-year-old says."I was looking to get involved in action, which is going to create change."Image source, ZakZak joined the group after being inspired by the Insulate Britain campaign, who were known for gluing themselves to the motorway and stopping traffic.Xanthe Flynn, who uses the pronouns they/them, says they don't like to "call it activism because it's my whole life". "It's not just a protest that you go and do, and then you go back to your safe space," the 18-year-old says."It's also been a massive learning space. Because I didn't get taught really about this in school." 'Bodies on the line'Zak and Xanthe have both been arrested as a result of their actions."I sat on top of an oil tanker for about six, seven hours before I was arrested," Zak says.Zak says being held by police "isn't the nicest thing" but is "incomparable to the consequences of climate change". "Being arrested is not something any of us want to do, it's quite scary," Xanthe adds.Image source, XantheAs for the impact on their futures of having a police record, both are concerned, but "it's not the most important thing" Xanthe says."I'll explain to future employers why I was arrested. And if they don't understand I think it'll be very hard to be in that job.""Would I really want to be employed by someone who judges me for getting arrested for doing something which is quite literally an act of love?," Zak adds.But are there other, less disruptive ways to get their message across?Claudia says they don't "want to cause disruption" and adds their tactics are "not something they choose to do for fun".After years of petitions and words, she adds "we're out of time"."What other options are we left with, apart from to put our bodies on the line," says Zak.Image source, ClaudiaThere has been criticism of the group for being "middle-class, privileged" young people, but Claudia says: "If you have the privilege of being able to take that risk, then you have a duty to do so".Zak, though, says he has encountered people from lots of different backgrounds in the group."They take time off work, some of them potentially risk their jobs.""I don't think it's a case of everyone being a trust fund kid whose lifestyles are funded by parents. "I think it's a case of people caring about the future generations." Image source, Just Stop Oil/ PA MediaXanthe is happy to use their privilege of "being white and born in Oxford"."I can do that because I know that I might not get treated as badly, so the consequences won't be so bad." "We can use our privilege. Because a lot of people can't." Despite feeling worried about the current situation, Claudia, Zak and Xanthe are united in still optimistic things can improve."I think that we need to have hope to continue and hope that something will change," Xanthe adds.Follow Newsbeat on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.Listen to Newsbeat live at 12:45 and 17:45 weekdays - or listen back here. More on this storyProtesters breach oil terminal injunctionWhy protesters are tying themselves to goalpostsA really simple guide to climate change

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Asahi Shimbun Digital

参院選公示、論戦はじまる 円安や物価上昇対策、安全保障など争点に

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