Preloader

Day: 22 June 2022

UK News - The Scottish Sun | Latest news, sports, showbiz, and celebrities RSS Feed

Rangers, Celtic, Hearts, Hibs, Aberdeen transfer news LIVE: Bernabei update, Colak chase, Barron latest

Jorge's Granted to join JambosBy Robert Martin Jorge Grant will become Hearts next summer signing as soon as he negotiates an exit from Peterborough. The 28-year-old travelled up for talks at Riccarton last weekend and has verbally agreed a deal with the Tynecastle club. Jorge Grant of Peterborough United is on his way to HeartsCredit: Getty But the fee the Jambos have offered is less than the £750,000 release clause in his Posh contract, which has two years to run. And talks will continue between all sides in a bid to reach a successful resolution to allow the midfielder to continue his career in Scotland. Boss Robbie Neilson has already added Kye Rowles, Lewis Neilson and Alan Forrest this summer. And he is close to pipping new QPR boss Michael Beale with a deal to bring Alex Cochrane back. The left-sided defender spent last season on loan from Brighton, helping the men in maroon finish third and reach the Scottish Cup final. That also caught the attention of QPR, who appointed ex-Gers coach Beale last week, as well as Coventry and Luton. But Neilson made it known from the outset he was keen on bringing Cochrane back on a permanent deal. And there is an outside chance the 22-year-old will be on the plane when Hearts fly out to Spain for a training camp on Friday.

  • no reactions
0
0 Share
UK News - Belfast Telegraph RSS Feed

Uvalde school police chief put on leave after response called ‘abject failure’

The Uvalde school district’s police chief has been placed on leave following allegations his response to the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School that left 19 students and two teachers dead was an “abject failure”. valde Consolidated Independent School District superintendent Hal Harrell said that he put schools police chief Pete Arredondo on administrative leave because the facts of what happened the day in southern Texas remain unclear. In a statement, Mr Harrell did not address officer’s actions as on-site commander during the attack, but said he did not know when details of multiple investigations into the law enforcement response to the slayings would be revealed. “From the beginning of this horrible event, I shared that the district would wait until the investigation was complete before making personnel decisions,” Mr Harrell said. “Because of the lack of clarity that remains and the unknown timing of when I will receive the results of the investigations, I have made the decision to place chief Arredondo on administrative leave effective on this date.” A spokesperson for the Uvalde school district, Anne Marie Espinoza, declined to say whether Mr Arredondo would continue to be paid while on leave. Another officer will assume the embattled chief’s duties, Mr Harrell said. Colonel Steven McCraw, director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, told a state Senate hearing on Tuesday that Mr Arredondo made “terrible decisions” as the massacre unfolded on May 24 , and that the police response was an “abject failure”. Close Steven McCraw has said parents begged police outside the school to move in and students inside the classroom repeatedly pleaded with 911 operators for help (Eric Gay/AP) AP/PA Images Steven McCraw has said parents begged police outside the school to move in and students inside the classroom repeatedly pleaded with 911 operators for help (Eric Gay/AP) Three minutes after 18-year-old Salvador Ramos entered the school, sufficient armed law enforcement were on scene to stop the gunman, Mr McCraw testified. Yet police officers armed with rifles waited in a school hallway for more than an hour while the gunman carried out the massacre. The classroom door could not be locked from the inside, but there is no indication officers tried to open the door while the gunman was inside, Mr McCraw said. The colonel has said parents begged police outside the school to move in and students inside the classroom repeatedly pleaded with 911 operators for help while more than a dozen officers waited in a hallway. Officers from other agencies urged Mr Arredondo to let them move in because children were in danger. “The only thing stopping a hallway of dedicated officers from entering Room 111 and 112 was the on-scene commander who decided to place the lives of officers before the lives of children,” Mr McCraw said. Mr Arredondo has tried to defend his actions, telling the Texas Tribune that he did not consider himself the commander in charge of operations and that he assumed someone else had taken control of the law enforcement response. He said he did not have his police and campus radios but that he used his cellphone to call for tactical gear, a sniper and the classroom keys. It is still not clear why it took so long for police to enter the classroom, how they communicated with each other during the attack and what their body cameras show. Officials have declined to release more details, citing the investigation. Mr Arredondo, 50, grew up in Uvalde and spent much of his nearly 30-year career in law enforcement in the city. He took the head police job at the school district in 2020 and was sworn in as a member of the city council in a closed-door ceremony on May 31.

  • no reactions
0
0 Share
http://feeds.feedburner.com/daily-express-news-showbizedit

Washington warns unilateral action on hated Brexit deal 'not conducive' to UK-US talks

Joe Biden's administration in Washington has put pressure on Boris Johnson not to take measures to unilaterally axe elements of Ulster's post-Brexit arrangements. Liz Truss, who replaced Lord David Frost as the UK's Brexit negotiator in December, unveiled measures to use domestic law to override aspects of the Northern Ireland Protocol last month.According to the Government website, the Protocol Bill “ensures the delicate balance of the Belfast Agreement”, “introduces durable solutions to fix the four key issues with the Protocol” and “remove[s] unnecessary costs and paperwork for businesses”.However, the Guardian has claimed Washington has issued a new warning for Brexit Britain.A senior administration official said: “It’s fair to say that the administration has concerns about the legislation.“The administration does not believe that unilateral steps are going to be the most effective way to address the challenges facing the implementation of the Protocol, and that our strong desire remains to see the UK and the EU return to talks and find a negotiated agreement.”JUST IN: Study says Brexit leaves Brits poorer as cost of living crisis bitesThe White House also addressed remarks made by a spokesperson last week which suggested there was no link between the UK's response to the Northern Ireland Protocol and negotiations with America.The insider claimed: “It is true that there is no formal linkage between the Protocol and a free trade agreement but the current situation does not create a conducive environment.”The UK has previously been issued with threats from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.Last month, she even claimed Congress would not support a trade deal between the UK and US if the Government discarded the Northern Ireland Protocol.READ MORE: Wanted! A Brexiteer outside Cabinet to replace Boris Johnson... is David Davis the answer?Northern Ireland Minister Conor Burns visited Washington last week in a bid to convince staff in the White House that concerns over violence in Ulster remain as a consequence of the Protocol.During his visit, the Eurosceptic Bournemouth West MP said: “We're bringing forward primary legislation to try and resolve the challenges around the Protocol.“Essentially, to make good on our promise to the people of Northern Ireland that they would be integral within the UK's internal market, whilst at the same time protecting the EU's legitimate ambition to protect their Single Market.”Mr Burns added: “We're very clear, however, that we still would like to resolve this in a negotiated way with the EU.DON'T MISS:Imperial legacy is a major asset for Brexit Britain - NEW report [INSIGHT]Brexit Britain still has 'OVER 2,000 EU rules' to be revealed [REVEALED]Have Your Say: Would you vote for an 'anti-Brexit' candidate? [REACTION]“But until they can broaden and deepen the mandate of negotiations they have, we have an obligation to move forward with primary legislation to protect the institutions of the Belfast Good Friday Agreement, restore devolved Government to Northern Ireland and let the new Government in Northern Ireland have access to the some £430million available to them.”Brexit-backing MPs in Westminster are also adamant that concerns about the Northern Ireland Protocol should not torpedo any transatlantic trade negotiations.European Research Group chairman Mark Francois, who described a UK-US deal as the “great prize”, told Express.co.uk last month: “We absolutely have to address this in order to uphold and maintain the Good Friday Agreement and that’s an argument that I think we need to explain to our partners in the United States.”

  • no reactions
0
0 Share
UK News - The Independent » Top Stories RSS Feed

Carlsberg to trial eco-friendly fibre beer bottle in UK

Beer giant Carlsberg is set to conduct its biggest trial in a bid to launch its fibre beer bottle across Europe.Eight thousand of the group’s new bottles – all completely recyclable – will be sampled by customers in eight markets across the continent including the UK, Poland and France.The bottle has been made with a wood-based fibre shell and contains a lining made of a plant-based Polyethylene Furanoate (PEF) polymer.Carlsberg said the materials can all be recycled and claimed it will retain the beer’s “taste and fizziness” against the same product in glass bottles.

  • no reactions
0
0 Share
UK News - The Independent » Top Stories RSS Feed

Revealed: Why hamsters die

Hamsters are among the most popular pets around the world, commonly given to children because they are cute, easy to care for, never outstay their welcome and offer valuable lessons in commitment and responsibility that prepare a family for taking on a larger, more demanding animal like a puppy or kitten.These small rodents are perfectly content spending their days spinning in wheels or roaming through elaborate labyrinths of plastic tubing and seldom complain provided they are kept supplied with fresh sawdust, drinking water and seed mix.However, until now, relatively little research has been done into the threats to their health and wellbeing, meaning their sudden death or diagnosis with a terminal illness by a vet can leave their impressionable young owners facing an upsetting shock.The new VetCompass study from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC), whose findings were published on Thursday, sought to find out more about precisely what ails the common hamster, something the animals themselves typically prefer to keep concealed to avoid betraying a weakness to predators, with a view to better preparing families for their pet’s inevitable demise.Given that the average lifespan of these creatures is just 1.75 years or 21 months, the end tends to come sooner rather than later.The study was the largest of its kind undertaken anywhere in the world to date and saw scientists examine the anonymised clinical records of a random sample of almost 4,000 hamsters, with the Syrian or golden variety accounting for the majority of cases at 73.5 per cent, followed by the Djungarian or winter white dwarf (13.8 per cent) and the Roborovski hamster (6.4 per cent).The researchers used the data to pinpoint the most common causes of death in the animals and the answers were, quite frankly, pretty disgusting.The likeliest fatal disorder turned out to be a nasty sounding condition known as “wet tail”, a bacterial infection brought on by stress often associated with dissatisfaction over their living conditions or treatment that caused 7.33 per cent of the hamsters studied to die of dehydration as a result of diarrhoea.Arguably even nastier was the second most common: death by bite injuries from violent territorial brawls with other hamsters, which proved mortal in 5.88 per cent of cases.Perhaps these furry little warlords are not so cuddly after all.The top five was rounded out by overgrown nails (4.13 per cent), overgrown front teeth (3.98 per cent) and traumatic injury (3.8 per cent), all equally unpleasant ways to go.Dr Dan O’Neill, associate professor in companion animal epidemiology at the RVC and lead author of the paper, said: “Parents can now help their children with realistic expectations of how long their hamster may live and what are the most common conditions to look out for to protect the health of these delightful little creatures.”Justine Shotton, president of the British Veterinary Association, added: “Hamsters can make good pets but it’s important for their specific welfare needs, such as being nocturnal, to be understood and met and that both owners and vets are aware of the common signs of ill health, so they know when medical intervention is needed.“It is advisable to speak to a vet before getting any pet, to make sure it is the right animal for all who will be responsible for it.”

  • no reactions
0
0 Share
BBC News

Martin Lewis says he was rejected by House of Lords

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThis video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Consumer champion Martin Lewis has revealed that he applied recently to become a member of the House of Lords but was turned down.The founder of the Money Saving Expert website told the BBC's Nick Robinson he had been "honest" about not having enough time to attend many sittings.He added that his "most important job" was looking after his nine-year-old daughter during early evenings.Mr Lewis said he would be more ready for politics in a couple of years.A House of Lords spokesperson said appointments were "not determined on the basis of caring or family circumstances" and that "some very good candidates" were rejected.In a wide-ranging interview for the Political Thinking with Nick Robinson podcast, Mr Lewis also spoke of how his nickname at the school - at which there were only two Jewish boys in his year - had been "Jew".And he described Westminster's adversarial politics as "abominable" and in need of major reform to help the UK deal with future crises.Martin Lewis's interview with Nick Robinson will be broadcast on BBC Radio 4 at 1730 BST on Saturday and will also be available on BBC Sounds and the Political Thinking website.The 50-year-old revealed that, until his early thirties, he thought he would "go into politics at some point" and the "obvious thing" to do had been to run to become an MP."I was a pretty decent political speaker," he said, adding that he had been a member of the Liberal Democrats until the age of 24 and a "floating voter" since then.Mr Lewis, who hosts ITV's the Martin Lewis Money Show, has been critical of the government over the cost-of-living crisis, calling for more intervention to help people on low and middle incomes as inflation soars."I never attacked the Tories," he told Nick Robinson. "I attacked the policies of the government."This video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.He also said he would never take on a "polemic party job" in politics because "my mental health is not robust enough to deal with it and I wouldn't put my family through it".But, when asked if he had ever wanted a peerage, Mr Lewis replied: "Yeah. I just got turned down again a couple of weeks ago, actually."He revealed that he had been interviewed by the House of Lords Appointments Commission with a view to becoming a crossbench - or independent - peer."I did this really silly thing," he added. "I was honest in the interview..."I said - because most of the time that the Lords sits about three till 10 [pm] on a Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday - 'Look, I need to be straight with you in terms of the hours I can give. I'm very busy with my job, but most importantly I have a nine-year-old daughter and until she's 13, my most important job from 6.30 until eight at night is to be with her and to put her to bed, maybe until she's 12, whatever'."Mr Lewis said that this had proved to be "a stumbling block, although [the committee] have invited me to apply again in future"."When I got the [rejection] letter, I breathed a sigh of relief because there's a lot of pressure on at the moment," he added. "And I thought maybe [reapplying in] a couple of years is probably more sensible."In response, a spokesperson for the commission said: "Appointments are made based on how people can contribute to the House, but are not determined on the basis of caring or family circumstances."It's a very competitive process. We make very few appointments and consequently we have to turn down some very good candidates."'Collective brains'Mr Lewis described the adversarial, party-based system of Westminster politics, and that in operation in other western democracies, as "destructive, horrendous"."Can you imagine any other institution that has its leading executive team split into two or more and are made to face off, shout at each other and oppose?" Mr Lewis asked."We've got 650 people in the House of Commons. I would like to see those collective brains working together for the betterment of the country rather than to knock back at each other in the Commons."Looking back to his schooldays in Chester, Mr Martin said: "There were two Jews in the year. And my nickname was Jew. And it originally, I think, had been something like [the actor and comedian] Jerry Lewis or something, something a bit warmer. And then, just in the way that it works, it was shortened. "And of course, this is the 1980s and it was just something I accepted. I didn't see it as pejorative. I didn't see it as anti-Semitic..."I look back at it and think it was, but I don't think it was deliberately or descriptively [pejorative]."More on this storyFuel and energy price rises 'catastrophic''People choosing whether to freeze or to starve'

  • no reactions
0
0 Share
UK News - The Independent » Top Stories RSS Feed

Tom Hanks says it’s an ‘honour’ to crash weddings, after being repeatedly photographed with newly married couples

Tom Hanks has discussed his reputation as a “wedding crasher” after being repeatedly photographed with newly-wed couples.In an interview to promote his role in Baz Luhrmann’s Elvis on chat show Late Night with Seth Meyers, the 65-year-old actor reflected on three times he’s appeared at strangers’ nuptials. Initially the Forrest Gump star joked it was purely to serve his own ego, quipping: “I keep thinking, ‘What would these people like more than anything else to remember this magic day of days? Oh, I know: Me.’”The first occurance was in Rome during the filming of 2009’s Angels & Demons, the sequel to The Da Vinci Code. A location shoot at the Pantheon inadvertently disrupted a wedding taking place at the same venue. “It is a consecrated Catholic church,” recalled Hanks. “So we were shooting in front of it and lo and behold they had booked a wedding in there while we’re shooting stuff with trucks... and this limousine pulled up and it was the bride and the groom.”Hanks was photographed navigating through equipment as he personally escorted the bride and her father to the altar.The second incident took place in Pittsburgh, when Hanks and his wife Rita Wilson had a day off from filming 2019 Mr Rogers biopic A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood. “Rita and I are going off for a walk somewhere on our day off and just as we were getting into our car, in the condominium part of the building, this wedding party was coming up to get into the biggest cocktail booze-cruise bus I’d ever seen,” explained Hanks, adding that he thought to himself: “Well, if the bride comes out, I jump out and take a pictures... well, she shows up, so yeah, I crashed their wedding photo.”In March this year, Hanks actually earned an invite to a strangers’ wedding while in Pennsylvania shooting the forthcoming A Man Called Otto.Access unlimited streaming of movies and TV shows with Amazon Prime Video Sign up now for a 30-day free trialSign upFan Krisna Poznik wrote to Hanks to ask if he’d officiate her wedding, and the actor agreed. “It was Krisna and her old man, as I like to call him. I had a couple of words to say, they wrote their vows and it was absolutely beautiful. And it was a great honour.”When Meyers noted that all three couples are still together, Hanks replied: “There you go. I think a little fairy dust has been sprinkled upon the altar there.”

  • no reactions
0
0 Share
UK News - The Scottish Sun | Latest news, sports, showbiz, and celebrities RSS Feed

Husband, 38, CAN use late wife’s embryo to have child after she died suddenly, High Court rules

A HUSBAND can use his late wife's embryo to have a child after she died suddenly, the High Court has ruled.Ted Jennings, 38, was finally given the green light to use an embryo created with his sperm and an egg from his late wife Fern-Marie Choya. 2Ted Jennings has been granted permission to use his late wife's embryoCredit: PA 2Fern Marie Choya died from a uterine rupture in February 2019Credit: PA Ms Choya died in 2019 after her womb ruptured while she was 18 weeks pregnant with twin girls. The 40-year-old had undergone a number of IVF cycles since 2013 and tragically miscarried several times. Ted, of North London, wanted to use the couple's one remaining embryo created in 2018 and is in storage at a private fertility clinic in London, to use "in treatment with a surrogate mother". The investment manager asked a High Court judge to allow him to lawfully use the embryo despite the fact his late did not given written consent before her death. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) rejected his original application on those grounds. But, in a ruling on Wednesday, Mrs Justice Theis said she was "satisfied" that Ms Choya did consent to using the embryo in the event of her death. The judge also concluded that Ms Choya wasn't given sufficient opportunity to give the consent in writing because a form she completed during the IVF process was "far from clear" in prompts about what a woman should do to provide consent to loved ones after death. She said HFEA "may want to consider" reviewing the form in light of the verdict. Most read in The Scottish Sun Justice Theis said: "Turning to the issue of Ms Choya's consent, I am satisfied that, in the circumstances of this case, the court can infer from all the available evidence that Ms Choya would have consented to Mr Jennings being able to use their partner-created embryo in treatment with a surrogate in the event of her death. "This is being considered in the context where, in my judgment, she had not been given relevant information and/or a sufficient opportunity to discuss it with the clinic." She ruled there was "no conflict of individuals' rights" and that permitting Mr Jennings to go ahead "would not undermine a fundamental objective of the statutory scheme, namely the requirement for consent". The judge also said Mr Jennings' case would not "open any floodgates" to more claims now that written consent would no longer be an obstacle it once was for loved ones seeking to have kids with their late partner's embryo or sperm. The court was told accountant Fern-Marie underwent three unsuccessful cycles of IVF treatment in 2013 and 2014. She conceived naturally in 2015 and 2016 but tragically suffered two miscarriages. The couple then had further IVF in 2017 and 2018 after rem-mortgaging their home in Highbury, North London, to pay for the treatment. The second proved successful and Fern-Marie fell pregnant in late 2018. Tragically she developed complications at 18 weeks which resulted in a uterine rupture. Fern-Marie passed away the following February and one embryo was kept in storage. In a witness statement before the judge, Mr Jennings said he did not recall either him or his wife having any "negative emotions towards parenthood in the event of using a surrogate, donated embryos or adopting a child". He added: "Our emotional journey was going from the helplessness of the infertility compounded by the feeling of unjustness given all the other medical issues already faced. "We eventually got to the position of accepting that having given IVF our best shot, this would be the last time and the final embryo would be saved for surrogacy." He also said he had discussed with his wife what should happen if either of them died and that the twins should be saved if there was a choice between her and them. The judge also considered evidence from Ms Choya's family, whom she described as speaking "with one voice" about what she would have wanted. This included evidence from one of her four sisters who said she "wholeheartedly" believes Ms Choya would want Mr Jennings to use the frozen embryo in treatment with a surrogate.

  • no reactions
0
0 Share
Daily Mail Online

Mother, 37, stabbed to death along with her five-year-old son at their north London home

PICTURED: Mother, 37, stabbed to death along with her five-year-old son at their north London home as man, 37, remains in police custody Yi Chen was discovered suffering from stab wounds at her home in BarnetA 37-year-old man remains in police custody and is known to the Chinese family  Family members sobbed as they left toys, candles and flowers at the scene By James Fielding and Emma James For Mailonline Published: 12:33 EDT, 22 June 2022 | Updated: 19:44 EDT, 22 June 2022

  • no reactions
0
0 Share