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Day: 2 July 2022

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Daphne du Maurier: Novelist who traced past to a French debtors' jail

Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, UNITED PRESS PHOTO/AFPDame Daphne du Maurier, the English novelist who died in 1989, was fascinated by her French heritage. The author of Rebecca and Jamaica Inn had been brought up on tales of an aristocratic ancestor who came to London during the French Revolution, fleeing the guillotine and the militant sans-culottes.But when she began looking into her family history, she discovered it was all rather more complicated. Far from being nobles, her French ancestors were in fact bourgeois artisans whose trade was glassmaking.And the 1790 émigré was not a runaway from the revolutionary mob, but from a debtors' prison.Today it is possible to retrace the footsteps of Daphne du Maurier, as she carried out her research in France in the 1950s. Driving around the Perche region, 120 miles (190km) south-west of Paris, she visited the farmsteads, châteaux and glass foundries that featured in her family story.Image source, Anne Hall: Sur les pas de Daphné Du MaurierThey became the setting for her 1963 historical novel The Glass-Blowers, in which she told of her great-great-grandfather Robert Busson, of his modest roots making perfume bottles in the forests near Le Mans, and how he came to sire an artistic dynasty of English du Mauriers in London. The starting point of her travels was the house in the village of Le Gué de Launay which was once the home of her ancestor's sister, a woman called Sophie Duval. It was Sophie's letters, written in the 1840s and now preserved at Exeter University, that formed the basis of all future investigations, because in them, Sophie looked back at her own long life. She was born in the 1760s, the daughter, sister and then the wife of glass-blowers.Daphne du Maurier set the opening scene of her novel The Glass-Blowers on the terrace of the house, and it is still there much as it was, hidden amid the wooded vales and pastures. "Daphne du Maurier came here to get a sense of place for the opening of her book," says the current Anglo-French owner Mary Buisson, herself a fan of the author."We used to read her books under the sheets at our convent. Who would have thought I would end up in the house of her ancestor?"This part of France is still very forested. Back in the 18th Century, it was even more so. This, plus probably the arrival of Italian craftsmen at some unrecorded point in medieval time, led to it becoming one of the country's main centres of pre-industrial era glass manufacture."To make glass, you need three things: wood, clay and sand. Here, they had them all in abundance," says Bernard Malcor, an expert in the old verreries or glass foundries. His family has lived in the nearby village of Le Plessis-Dorin since 1803.MORE FROM HUGH: Searching for Rumer Godden's French pastIn Le Plessis-Dorin was one of the foundries that Daphne's ancestors managed in the years before the French Revolution. Indeed, it was while based here that du Maurier's ancestor, Robert Busson, began the commercial business that eventually went bust, requiring him to leave post-haste for the channel ports.A successor to the original foundry kept going until the 1950s, employing hundreds of local workers and supplying phials for scent-makers like Guerlain and Coty. But then, as with all the verreries, hard economics took over. Unable to compete with the big new factories, they closed.But the woods and fields have their memories. Today, there are scores of place names including the word verrerie, and locals still turn up lumps of what looks like vitreous rock: molten dregs from the furnaces, which were smashed and used as aggregate to line the muddy lanes. "Over the centuries, there would have been hundreds of glass foundries in the forests. They would consume the wood in a given area, then just move on. It was a bit like slash and burn in the Amazon," says Frédéric de Montalembert, whose Château de La Pierre has another du Maurier connection.The émigré's father, Mathurin Busson, managed the verrerie at La Pierre when Robert was a boy. During this time, the family, who were only of the upper artisan class, had permission to live inside the château. Did this give Robert Busson delusions of grandeur? All we know is that having left for London, he took the name du Maurier and let it be erroneously understood that he was titled.From Robert Busson du Maurier, there then sprang the line that came down to Daphne. In between were other du Mauriers of artistic renown. Robert's son was an inventor, and his son - Daphne's grandfather - was the novelist and Punch cartoonist George du Maurier.In his day, George was every bit as famous as Daphne. The social commentary of his cartoons helped create modern British humour, while his novel Trilby - apart from indirectly giving the name to the hat - was also one of the first blockbusters. Image source, Getty ImagesHis son, the actor-manager Gerald du Maurier, was Daphne's father.Did all these generations of du Mauriers believe in their supposed aristocratic past? Or did they suspect it was a fake? There is no clear answer. Certainly, Daphne seems to have been sold the "noblesse" line by her father Gerald, so that when she debunked it in the 1950s, her discovery of the family's more ordinary roots felt like a surprise.DU MAURIER: Mistress of suspense"She was not at all snobbish," says American academic Anne Hall, who lives in the Perche region and has made a study of the du Mauriers' French connection. "So she was genuinely very proud when she found out her ancestors were craftsmen."But Anne Hall says there was probably a bit of family myth-making as well. She has discovered that George du Maurier, who was born in Paris in 1834, spent holidays as a boy with his letter-writing great-aunt Sophie Duval at Le Gué de Launay. As she was a living link with the glass-blowing past, he surely would have got more than a hint of it.For Daphne du Maurier, as for the curious visitor today, the end of the journey is an hour's drive to the south from the verreries of Le Plessis-Dorin and La Pierre, at another abandoned glass foundry, called Chérigny.In the 1760s, the patriarch Mathurin Busson was working and starting his family here. Image source, James O'MaraThey lived in a small farmhouse, whose name was Le Maurier, and in 1747, that is where Robert Busson, the émigré, was born. He took his "title" not from a château, but from the cottage where he first saw light of day.The farmhouse is still there, one of a million French farmhouses you see signposted off the main road and then drive down a mile of rutted track to reach.The same family - the Léons - has been farming there for the last 80 years. And yes, they do get the occasional visit from a du Maurier tourist. Daphne herself came, they recall, and in the house is a keepsake that proves it.It is a French paperback version of The Glass-Blowers, with a personal dedication.Where my ancestors lived, Respect and Best Wishes, 23rd September 1973. Daphne du Maurier.More on this storyDid Du Maurier predict Brexit?17 August 2016My search for British novelist's famed French summer25 October 2020

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Daphne du Maurier: Novelist who traced past to a French debtors' jail

Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, UNITED PRESS PHOTO/AFPDame Daphne du Maurier, the English novelist who died in 1989, was fascinated by her French heritage. The author of Rebecca and Jamaica Inn had been brought up on tales of an aristocratic ancestor who came to London during the French Revolution, fleeing the guillotine and the militant sans-culottes.But when she began looking into her family history, she discovered it was all rather more complicated. Far from being nobles, her French ancestors were in fact bourgeois artisans whose trade was glassmaking.And the 1790 émigré was not a runaway from the revolutionary mob, but from a debtors' prison.Today it is possible to retrace the footsteps of Daphne du Maurier, as she carried out her research in France in the 1950s. Driving around the Perche region, 120 miles (190km) south-west of Paris, she visited the farmsteads, châteaux and glass foundries that featured in her family story.Image source, Anne Hall: Sur les pas de Daphné Du MaurierThey became the setting for her 1963 historical novel The Glass-Blowers, in which she told of her great-great-grandfather Robert Busson, of his modest roots making perfume bottles in the forests near Le Mans, and how he came to sire an artistic dynasty of English du Mauriers in London. The starting point of her travels was the house in the village of Le Gué de Launay which was once the home of her ancestor's sister, a woman called Sophie Duval. It was Sophie's letters, written in the 1840s and now preserved at Exeter University, that formed the basis of all future investigations, because in them, Sophie looked back at her own long life. She was born in the 1760s, the daughter, sister and then the wife of glass-blowers.Daphne du Maurier set the opening scene of her novel The Glass-Blowers on the terrace of the house, and it is still there much as it was, hidden amid the wooded vales and pastures. "Daphne du Maurier came here to get a sense of place for the opening of her book," says the current Anglo-French owner Mary Buisson, herself a fan of the author."We used to read her books under the sheets at our convent. Who would have thought I would end up in the house of her ancestor?"This part of France is still very forested. Back in the 18th Century, it was even more so. This, plus probably the arrival of Italian craftsmen at some unrecorded point in medieval time, led to it becoming one of the country's main centres of pre-industrial era glass manufacture."To make glass, you need three things: wood, clay and sand. Here, they had them all in abundance," says Bernard Malcor, an expert in the old verreries or glass foundries. His family has lived in the nearby village of Le Plessis-Dorin since 1803.MORE FROM HUGH: Searching for Rumer Godden's French pastIn Le Plessis-Dorin was one of the foundries that Daphne's ancestors managed in the years before the French Revolution. Indeed, it was while based here that du Maurier's ancestor, Robert Busson, began the commercial business that eventually went bust, requiring him to leave post-haste for the channel ports.A successor to the original foundry kept going until the 1950s, employing hundreds of local workers and supplying phials for scent-makers like Guerlain and Coty. But then, as with all the verreries, hard economics took over. Unable to compete with the big new factories, they closed.But the woods and fields have their memories. Today, there are scores of place names including the word verrerie, and locals still turn up lumps of what looks like vitreous rock: molten dregs from the furnaces, which were smashed and used as aggregate to line the muddy lanes. "Over the centuries, there would have been hundreds of glass foundries in the forests. They would consume the wood in a given area, then just move on. It was a bit like slash and burn in the Amazon," says Frédéric de Montalembert, whose Château de La Pierre has another du Maurier connection.The émigré's father, Mathurin Busson, managed the verrerie at La Pierre when Robert was a boy. During this time, the family, who were only of the upper artisan class, had permission to live inside the château. Did this give Robert Busson delusions of grandeur? All we know is that having left for London, he took the name du Maurier and let it be erroneously understood that he was titled.From Robert Busson du Maurier, there then sprang the line that came down to Daphne. In between were other du Mauriers of artistic renown. Robert's son was an inventor, and his son - Daphne's grandfather - was the novelist and Punch cartoonist George du Maurier.In his day, George was every bit as famous as Daphne. The social commentary of his cartoons helped create modern British humour, while his novel Trilby - apart from indirectly giving the name to the hat - was also one of the first blockbusters. Image source, Getty ImagesHis son, the actor-manager Gerald du Maurier, was Daphne's father.Did all these generations of du Mauriers believe in their supposed aristocratic past? Or did they suspect it was a fake? There is no clear answer. Certainly, Daphne seems to have been sold the "noblesse" line by her father Gerald, so that when she debunked it in the 1950s, her discovery of the family's more ordinary roots felt like a surprise.DU MAURIER: Mistress of suspense"She was not at all snobbish," says American academic Anne Hall, who lives in the Perche region and has made a study of the du Mauriers' French connection. "So she was genuinely very proud when she found out her ancestors were craftsmen."But Anne Hall says there was probably a bit of family myth-making as well. She has discovered that George du Maurier, who was born in Paris in 1834, spent holidays as a boy with his letter-writing great-aunt Sophie Duval at Le Gué de Launay. As she was a living link with the glass-blowing past, he surely would have got more than a hint of it.For Daphne du Maurier, as for the curious visitor today, the end of the journey is an hour's drive to the south from the verreries of Le Plessis-Dorin and La Pierre, at another abandoned glass foundry, called Chérigny.In the 1760s, the patriarch Mathurin Busson was working and starting his family here. Image source, James O'MaraThey lived in a small farmhouse, whose name was Le Maurier, and in 1747, that is where Robert Busson, the émigré, was born. He took his "title" not from a château, but from the cottage where he first saw light of day.The farmhouse is still there, one of a million French farmhouses you see signposted off the main road and then drive down a mile of rutted track to reach.The same family - the Léons - has been farming there for the last 80 years. And yes, they do get the occasional visit from a du Maurier tourist. Daphne herself came, they recall, and in the house is a keepsake that proves it.It is a French paperback version of The Glass-Blowers, with a personal dedication.Where my ancestors lived, Respect and Best Wishes, 23rd September 1973. Daphne du Maurier.More on this storyDid Du Maurier predict Brexit?17 August 2016My search for British novelist's famed French summer25 October 2020

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Tom Cruise kicks off 60th birthday celebrations with cake and dancing at Adele concert

HOLLYWOOD megastar Tom Cruise kicked off his 60th birthday celebrations singing and dancing along to Adele.The actor, who turns 60 today, watched the Hello singer live at Hyde Park on Friday. 3VIP suite staff celebrated by singing Happy Birthday as Tom blew the candle out on a strawberry-smothered Victoria sponge 3Tom is said to have hugged his favourite hostess after the cake was brought out 3Hollywood megastar Tom kicked off his 60th birthday celebrations singing and dancing along to Adele.Credit: Getty VIP suite staff celebrated by singing Happy Birthday as he blew the candle out on a strawberry-smothered Victoria sponge. It came after the Top Gun star was seen “bopping along” and belting out lyrics to the Grammy winner’s hits. An eyewitness said: “Tom looked like he had an absolute blast. “He was really going for it with his dancing and seemed to know all the words to sing along. “After the set finished, staff brought the cake out for him and he couldn’t stop saying thank you. He hugged his favourite hostess as they sang Happy Birthday. “Then he gave a speech about how nice it was for everyone to be able to come together for events again after Covid. “And Tom said Adele was phenomenal. He was so upbeat and living his best life.” The Hollywood star was seen singing the break-up belters following his own split with actress Hayley Atwell. Most read in Showbiz Yesterday we exclusively revealed his Mission Impossible co-star, 40, is now dating music producer and self-styled pagan Ned Wolfgang Kelly. But it appears to be Water Under The Bridge for Tom, who watched Adele with his sister, M:I 7 director Christopher McQuarrie and other staff from next year’s blockbuster. A source said: “Tom loves coming to Hyde Park and has been to see The Eagles and the Rolling Stones there before. “But he really is a massive Adele fan and loved every minute. “Afterwards, he walked back to his Knightsbridge hotel with a single bodyguard to rest ahead of more birthday celebrations.” Tom is said to be planning trips to Wimbledon, which he attended with Hayley last year, and the British Grand Prix before throwing a bash for pals at Soho Farmhouse in Oxfordshire.

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Half of Brits set to get Covid ‘super-booster’ vaccine designed to protect from Omicron as sub-strain cases surge

COVID super booster vaccines are reportedly set to get the green light for millions of Brits from autumn. Around 30million over-50s are expected to be topped up with the jab, specifically designed to protect against the Omicron strain. 2Around 30million over-50s are reportedly set to be topped up with Moderna's 'super jab' from autumnCredit: AFP The so called super-booster from Moderna is claimed to be five times better than the original vaccine and is expected to get the go ahead from drugs regulators within weeks, the Mail on Sunday reports. It's unofficially named "214" and uses mRNA molecules to programme the immune system to protect against two types of Covid – the original Wuhan strain and Omicron. It comes as Omicron cases surge once again, with infection levels jumping by almost a third last week. They still remain lower however, than peak figures from March. Last Friday, the influential European Medicines Agency (EMA) said it believed Moderna’s new vaccine "may provide some advantages in widening the immune response" in recipients. And it said "bivalent vaccines could be considered … for use as boosters". Meanwhile, the company is already said to have held talks with UK health chiefs about dishing out the 214 jab. Dr Paul Burton, chief medical officer at Moderna, said there is a "definite interest" from the UK in buying its new vaccine, the Telegraph reports. Most read in Health Last month, Moderna released positive results showing the so-called super jab gave strong protection against Omicron BA4 and BA5 – the two sub-variants that are driving the current wave of infection. Dr Burton said: "I think the conclusions are that boosting … with 214, really could be a turning point in our fight against the SARS-Cov-2 virus." It comes after survivors of the Omicron Covid wave were warned they won’t be able to fend off new strains of the bug circulating. A study by Imperial College London found those who had previous Omicron illness were not immune to catching it again, including the older BA.1 and BA.2 versions, and newer BA.4 and BA.5 strains. That’s despite the fact they had an immune boost against previous strains, such as Delta and Alpha. Professor Danny Altmann, from Imperial’s Department of Immunology and Inflammation, said: “Not only can it break through vaccine defences, it looks to leave very few of the hallmarks we’d expect on the immune system. “It's more stealthy than previous variants and flies under the radar, so the immune system is unable to remember it.” However, he stressed vaccines are still protective against severe disease and death. 2Moderna is already said to have held talks with UK health chiefs about dishing out the 214 jabCredit: AFP

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Sarfaraz Khan: The 'wandering cricketer' on the road to stardom

Published3 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesBefore India's squad for the 2014 Under-19 cricket World Cup left Bangalore, Naushad Khan had come down to the city to meet his son. Sarfaraz Khan had found a spot as a batter in the 15-man squad alongside the likes of Shreyas Iyer, Sanju Samson, Deepak Hooda and Kuldeep Yadav. The side was coached by Bharat Arun, who would later become the architect of India's fast-bowling revolution.When Arun was told that Naushad was there, he called him up to his room. "He told me not to worry and said everything would be fine," Naushad recalls. "I told him, 'sir, please look after Sarfaraz, he is a little naughty'." Arun told him that Sarfaraz's humour was in fact an asset for the team. "He isn't afraid to stare down Australian and Pakistani players and crack some jokes. That lightens the mood. This is his attitude. And the day he loses it, his performance will also suffer," Arun says.Nothing much has changed since. Sarfaraz still cracks jokes. He plays for Mumbai in the Ranji Trophy, India's leading domestic cricket tournament.His Mumbai team coach, Amol Muzumdar, describes him as "the life of the team". He's still unafraid on a cricket field and he's still scoring runs in abundance.In the last two Ranji Trophy seasons, Sarfaraz has scored 1,910 runs in just 12 games, averaging 136.42. He scored seven centuries in 18 innings, and also made 11 fifties. His achievements can't be overstated. The all-time record for most runs in a Ranji Trophy season is held by VVS Laxman, who made 1,415 runs in the 1999-2000. It is still the gold standard of domestic cricket batting in India. Laxman got to play nine games that season. Sarfaraz has played only six games each in the last two seasons. By the end of his ninth game in this run, he had scored 1,479 runs. Image source, Getty ImagesThat is the kind of impact he's had. Much of the credit goes to his hard work and dedication but also to Naushad, who coached both Sarfaraz and his younger brother Musheer, who at 17 is also making waves as a cricketer.Sarfaraz often gets teary eyed when he talks about his childhood. He wonders what would have happened to him if his father wasn't there to support him. Naushad would often put a price on his wicket during practice sessions. He would give the bowler 50 rupees (£5) every time Sarfaraz got out. He did it to ensure that all bowlers gave his son a tough time in net sessions.He would end up spending 300-400 rupees on some days. That was a lot of money for the middle-class family and this made Sarfaraz work hard and not give away his wicket easily.Image source, Getty Images"I'm not saying this because he's my father, but it's difficult to find such a man in this world. His dedication is next level. He has problems in his knees, and eight years ago, the doctors told him to get operated. But he didn't because he thought that in case something goes wrong with the operation and he becomes wheelchair bound, how would he coach us?".Sarfaraz was a prodigious cricketing talent in school in Mumbai alongside Prithvi Shaw and Armaan Jaffer. But Naushad briefly moved to his home state of Uttar Pradesh (UP) when he felt it was tough to get opportunities in Mumbai.But the season with the UP team didn't go too well either, and the family moved back to Mumbai. He had to spend a mandatory "cooling off" period before he was eligible to play for the Mumbai team again.Another endorsement for his talent came in the Indian Premier League (IPL) T20 tournament when he became one of the three players to be retained by the Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) in 2018. Former Indian captain Virat Kohli and South African star AB de Villiers were the other two.A new auction meant that the teams could only retain a handful of players and the remaining had to go into the auction pool. An RCB analyst later said that they had identified Sarfaraz as one of the few players who could score at a blistering pace.However, his form didn't hold up that season and he had to answer questions about his perceived lack of discipline. Image source, Deepak Malik /SPORTZPICS for BCCIBut he continued to score heavily in the longer format of the game for Mumbai and that has made him a leading candidate for a spot in the national team.A lot has been talked about Sarfaraz's weight but it doesn't bother him. "When I have the bat in my hands, I get into that zone," he says. "It doesn't matter who is watching then, selectors or crowd. If it's Allah's wish, I will get selected."He backs himself because of his hard work and the training his father gave him. He had to become a "wandering nomad" every year to practice. His father would drive him to UP to avoid the rainy season in Mumbai as most practice venues shut during this period. During their 1,400km (870 miles) journey, they would make a stop in every city that had a practice venue.And that's just one example of the hard work the father-son duo have put in to realise their dream of seeing Sarfaraz play for India. And given the buzz about him in the media, the day may not be too far.More on this storyThe 90mph India bowler who's lighting up the IPL3 MayThe 'sleepy' girl who changed India cricket forever10 JuneWhy quitting was 'cornered' Kohli's only option17 January

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Sarfaraz Khan: The 'wandering cricketer' on the road to stardom

Published51 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesBefore India's squad for the 2014 Under-19 cricket World Cup left Bangalore, Naushad Khan had come down to the city to meet his son. Sarfaraz Khan had found a spot as a batter in the 15-man squad alongside the likes of Shreyas Iyer, Sanju Samson, Deepak Hooda and Kuldeep Yadav. The side was coached by Bharat Arun, who would later become the architect of India's fast-bowling revolution.When Arun was told that Naushad was there, he called him up to his room. "He told me not to worry and said everything would be fine," Naushad recalls. "I told him, 'sir, please look after Sarfaraz, he is a little naughty'." Arun told him that Sarfaraz's humour was in fact an asset for the team. "He isn't afraid to stare down Australian and Pakistani players and crack some jokes. That lightens the mood. This is his attitude. And the day he loses it, his performance will also suffer," Arun says.Nothing much has changed since. Sarfaraz still cracks jokes. He plays for Mumbai in the Ranji Trophy, India's leading domestic cricket tournament.His Mumbai team coach, Amol Muzumdar, describes him as "the life of the team". He's still unafraid on a cricket field and he's still scoring runs in abundance.In the last two Ranji Trophy seasons, Sarfaraz has scored 1,910 runs in just 12 games, averaging 136.42. He scored seven centuries in 18 innings, and also made 11 fifties. His achievements can't be overstated. The all-time record for most runs in a Ranji Trophy season is held by VVS Laxman, who made 1,415 runs in the 1999-2000. It is still the gold standard of domestic cricket batting in India. Laxman got to play nine games that season. Sarfaraz has played only six games each in the last two seasons. By the end of his ninth game in this run, he had scored 1,479 runs. Image source, Getty ImagesThat is the kind of impact he's had. Much of the credit goes to his hard work and dedication but also to Naushad, who coached both Sarfaraz and his younger brother Musheer, who at 17 is also making waves as a cricketer.Sarfaraz often gets teary eyed when he talks about his childhood. He wonders what would have happened to him if his father wasn't there to support him. Naushad would often put a price on his wicket during practice sessions. He would give the bowler 50 rupees (£5) every time Sarfaraz got out. He did it to ensure that all bowlers gave his son a tough time in net sessions.He would end up spending 300-400 rupees on some days. That was a lot of money for the middle-class family and this made Sarfaraz work hard and not give away his wicket easily.Image source, Getty Images"I'm not saying this because he's my father, but it's difficult to find such a man in this world. His dedication is next level. He has problems in his knees, and eight years ago, the doctors told him to get operated. But he didn't because he thought that in case something goes wrong with the operation and he becomes wheelchair bound, how would he coach us?".Sarfaraz was a prodigious cricketing talent in school in Mumbai alongside Prithvi Shaw and Armaan Jaffer. But Naushad briefly moved to his home state of Uttar Pradesh (UP) when he felt it was tough to get opportunities in Mumbai.But the season with the UP team didn't go too well either, and the family moved back to Mumbai. He had to spend a mandatory "cooling off" period before he was eligible to play for the Mumbai team again.Another endorsement for his talent came in the Indian Premier League (IPL) T20 tournament when he became one of the three players to be retained by the Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) in 2018. Former Indian captain Virat Kohli and South African star AB de Villiers were the other two.A new auction meant that the teams could only retain a handful of players and the remaining had to go into the auction pool. An RCB analyst later said that they had identified Sarfaraz as one of the few players who could score at a blistering pace.However, his form didn't hold up that season and he had to answer questions about his perceived lack of discipline. Image source, Deepak Malik /SPORTZPICS for BCCIBut he continued to score heavily in the longer format of the game for Mumbai and that has made him a leading candidate for a spot in the national team.A lot has been talked about Sarfaraz's weight but it doesn't bother him. "When I have the bat in my hands, I get into that zone," he says. "It doesn't matter who is watching then, selectors or crowd. If it's Allah's wish, I will get selected."He backs himself because of his hard work and the training his father gave him. He had to become a "wandering nomad" every year to practice. His father would drive him to UP to avoid the rainy season in Mumbai as most practice venues shut during this period. During their 1,400km (870 miles) journey, they would make a stop in every city that had a practice venue.And that's just one example of the hard work the father-son duo have put in to realise their dream of seeing Sarfaraz play for India. And given the buzz about him in the media, the day may not be too far.More on this storyThe 90mph India bowler who's lighting up the IPL3 MayThe 'sleepy' girl who changed India cricket forever10 JuneWhy quitting was 'cornered' Kohli's only option17 January

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Rylan Clark reassures worried Gogglebox fans after his mum Sue appears on a drip

RYLAN Clark took to Twitter to reassure fans his mum is doing Ok after they spotted her with a drip on telly.Rylan and his mum are currently appearing on Celebrity Gogglebox and Linda has become a huge hit with the public. 2Celebrity Gogglebox's Rylan Clark and his mum LindaCredit: Rex But on the most recent episode, fans became concerned when they spotted the drip during the show. The pair shared their usual hilarious banter, but eagle-eyed fans noticed the clear drip connected to Linda and lead down the side of the couch. One fan tweeted to the TV star: "@Rylan is Mum ok? Saw the drip on." Rylan replied: "Had a lot of people ask, mum is fine, she has a tpn line for a feed… to do with her crohns . V normal. Thanks for asking xx" It comes Rylan revealed he installed cameras in his mum’s home to keep an eye on her as her health deteriorates. Linda, 69, now has just 70cm of her bowel left, compared to the usual 2m, and has been fitted with a stoma bag following her latest major surgery to help with her Chrohn’s. While life is a lot more manageable for her, Linda admits she’s “not well a lot of the time” and Rylan he been left concerned about her. The Celebrity Gogglebox star explained: “I’ve got cameras in Mum’s house, so I can see her and make sure she’s OK.” Discussing how life is for her now, Linda told The Mirror: “I have nurses come round every morning and evening to give me a special feed. I’ve had Crohn’s since I was 30 and used to be in so much pain I’d be crying all the time. "It was unbearable – I felt like I wanted to get a knife and punch my stomach open. “I’ve had three major bowel operations, and with the last one I got a stoma bag. Now I don’t have pain, which is a relief, but I’ve got to have nutrition put in me. Everything goes straight through where I’ve hardly got any bowel left. Most read in TV “I’ve only got 70cm of bowel now, so if I have a drink of water I’ve got to empty the stoma straight away. My life is in the bathroom. I don’t know how long it will be until the doctors can’t do any more. I feel alright, but I get down because I can’t go out and I can’t do what I want to do.” The pair are closer than ever following Rylan’s split from husband Dan Neal last year. The former X Factor star separated from his husband of six years Dan Neal in June last year, and admitted he slept in bed with his mum Linda, 69, as he came to terms with his heartbreak. Rylan, 33, and his ex-husband Dan first revealed they were taking time apart in June 2021 after he made a "number of mistakes". The couple - who were wed in 2015 - confirmed their relationship was over shortly after, announcing the "breakdown of their marriage". Now, Rylan has opened up about how he struggled to come to terms with the breakdown - relying on his mum to get him by. He told OK! magazine how Linda was her "entire support" as she looked after him during the difficult year. 2Rylan reassured fans his mum was doing ok and she had the drip to treat her Chron's diseaseCredit: Channel 4

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UK News - The Scottish Sun | Latest news, sports, showbiz, and celebrities RSS Feed

Man Utd say Cristiano Ronaldo will NOT be sold, Serge Gnabry transfer EXCLUSIVE, Frenkie De Jong latest

Do no RonManchester United wantaway star Cristiano Ronaldo should ignore Chelsea’s interest and stay put at Old Trafford, claims former striker Louis Saha. Saha told BonusCodeBets: “It could go both ways, no one can guarantee anything apart from Cristiano. He’s the only one to answer that. “It wouldn’t be the right move for Man United to let him go because he’s such a big asset. “I can definitely see him continuing to keep doing what he’s doing best, which is scoring goals and helping his club get back to where it belongs. “He can still play a part under [Erik] Ten Hag, not only by scoring goals, but with his stature. “I’m sure the new manager will want to implement some new rules and new standards that fit with Ronaldo. Maybe not so much on the pressing side, but his work ethic and his desire to always be accountable. “Performance-wise, Ronaldo is up there with the best, he’ll drive the players that need confidence, like [Marcus] Rashford. “It’s a new manager, new rules, new atmosphere and I’m very excited”

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Watch horrifying moment weightlifter drops heavy barbell and it lands on his NECK with a sickening bounce

THIS is the horrifying moment a weightlifter was left seriously injured after dropping a heavy barbell on the back of his neck.Chilling footage showed the young man losing his grip on the weight and collapsing on the floor in agony while training at Box Colosso in Fortaleza, Brazil. 3The accident happened at a gym in Fortaleza, BrazilCredit: CEN 3Footage showed the man struggling when he tries to raise the weight above his headCredit: CEN 3The moment the heavy barbell crushes the man's neckCredit: CEN According to local reports, the man now requires surgery after the shocking accident. The spine-chilling video showed the man lifting the heavy barbell off the floor and successfully bringing it to his chest - but he starts to struggle when he tries to raise it above his head. He manages to get the weight up - but it overwhelms him and he drops the barbell. The heavy weight can be seen smashing into the back of his neck with a sickening bounce. The horror footage ends with the weightlifter lying flat on the floor screaming in pain as he appears to shake violently. A spokesperson for Box Colosso told local media he is due to undergo surgery. The man is still recovering in a hospital in Fortaleza, according to reports. The gym said: "The Box Colosso family, in solidarity with the MCSX student, through this note, wishes strength. Most read in News "And asks all Crossfit students, alumni, and fans to pray for the health of our athlete, who unfortunately suffered an accident. "The Colosso family is continuing to support him and do everything possible to help him. We also pray for his recovery." A post on the gym's Instagram said the athlete's recovery was a "miracle". Crossfit is a high-intensity sport that involves gymnastics, aerobic exercise, and Olympic weightlifting. It comes after horrifying footage captured the moment a woman was crushed to death by a 400lb barbell while working out in front of her daughter. The woman can be seen struggling with a device that appears to be too heavy, and she collapses under its weight onto the bench where the bar crushes her neck, killing her on the spot. And shocking footage also showed a bodybuilder trapped under a 120kg barbell after it fell on his NECK during a workout. Captured on CCTV at the Genesis gym in Brisbane, Australia, the astonishing clip shows Jason Layt lifting the huge weight without any assistance. The 28-year-old, who was attempting to beat his "personal best", is then pictured losing his grip and is suddenly trapped under the bar which is crushing his throat.

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Russian warships pass between Japan's westernmost islands

Three Russian naval vessels passed between Japan's two westernmost islands of Yonaguni and Iriomote, the Defense Ministry said Saturday, as tensions between Tokyo and Moscow continue to intensify over the Ukraine crisis. The destroyer, frigate and supply ships sailed between the islands near Taiwan from Friday through Saturday and moved into the East China Sea, said the ministry, which, for the first time, disclosed Russia's naval passage in the area. The ministry, which is analyzing the ships' actions and motives, presumed that they were on their way to return to Russia. The passage came amid an increased Russian and Chinese naval presence in waters around Japan. Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi said last month that five Russian naval ships "almost encircled Japan," and three Chinese vessels followed a similar path. The Russian destroyer and frigate had accompanied those five warships for part of their journey, sailing with them southward off Hokkaido and passing the Izu Islands south of Tokyo on June 16. Intensified Russian military activity near Japan has also involved a joint flight of bombers with China over the Sea of Japan, the East China Sea and the Pacific in late May. © KYODO

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