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Day: 4 July 2022

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Conversion therapy: 'I thought God hated me because I was gay'

Published12 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Jamie Niblock/BBCAs a young man, Joe Adams approached his Methodist minister and told him he was gay. Rather than being met with support and love, he was told he was "an abomination" and sent for conversion therapy.For years, he says, he lived as a "shadow" of his real self. Ordained at Birkenhead in 1999, by the time he came out in his 40s, Mr Adams was a married father-of-four. He feared he would lose both his family and his job. It did not happen - his family relationships grew stronger and he is now minister at the Wimpole Road Methodist Church in Colchester.Here, in his own words, the 57-year-old tells of his struggle with sexuality and of the "profound mental health damage" done to him during conversion therapy.I knew I was different in junior school.I didn't have many friends growing up partly because I felt so different. I came to faith when I was 18 - it was everything to me, it was a family, friends and a community.I told the Methodist minister there that I thought I was gay and he told me that "God can't love you, you're an abomination unto God and the only way you can be redeemed is if you are converted and changed to be straight".That was terrifying because he suggested I needed to leave and I couldn't leave, so I went along with it.Mr AdamsThey knocked me to the floor, they began hitting me, screaming for the devil to be removed from me and I was terrified."Reverend Joe AdamsMethodist MinisterHe sent me to a Pentecostal church and told me they were experts in conversion therapy. I walked up the stairs and there were three men who almost immediately started saying really nasty things.They knocked me to the floor, they began hitting me, screaming for the devil to be removed from me and I was terrified.After I can't remember how long, they ran out of steam. They put me on a chair and asked me if it worked, to which I replied "yes" as I wasn't daft and didn't want anymore. They told me my life would be better now I was straight and I just ran out of the room, to my car and just sat and cried for ages and ages, determined I would never tell anyone again.When I got back to my Methodist minister, he told me it wasn't over yet, in order for the transformation to be completed, I needed to find a nice woman, settle down, get married, have some children and the "gay would go away".It was awful, truly awful.Image source, The Adams FamilyI've only talked about it [the conversion therapy] during the last five years.It still hurts. It hurts to think that in many ways nothing's changed because if we don't have a ban on trans conversion therapy, and if we allow places of worship to have prayer and ministry that's coercive and manipulative, [then] nothing's changed.We wouldn't allow this level of bullying in any other sector of our life as a country and I don't really understand why we allow it for this, and the mental health harm it does to people.For the 30 years after I escaped that room there has been profound mental health damage.If you or someone you know is struggling with issues raised by this story, find support through BBC Action Line.I was ordained not long after and I have served in churches for 25 years and seen some amazing things and had some wonderful times, and it didn't matter how many hundreds of people were in the congregation, and how many times I said they were OK and God loved them, when I got home, I knew that God didn't love me. It was destroying me inside.Image source, Jamie Niblock/BBCIt disturbs me that that doesn't matter to people, that people think that's a price worth paying to control other people's lives.The pain of the blows didn't last that long but the words have stayed with me forever. I'm amazed I'm still alive because it's been such a difficult time but through it I had the privilege to be in love with my wife and we had some great times, and we have four children who I adore, but deep down it was hard for either of us to be really happy because of the burden of knowing I couldn't be what she needed and she couldn't be what I needed.It hurts that I lived so long thinking God hated me when I could've been living in the power of the love that I have found in churches. This church is so kind, so loving and I wish I had known this experience all those 30 years.It hurts that for so long I lived as a shadow.Image source, Joe AdamsWhen I came out in my late 40s, the assumption I made was that I would lose all of my family, that my four children wouldn't want to speak to me again and that I'd lose my job.None of those things happened.My relationships with my daughters and son are probably stronger than they've ever been and within the life of the church, the church is way more loving and kind and hopeful and graceful than I think that some people realise.Image source, Joe AdamsI've had tremendous support from Anglican and Methodist colleagues.Most people who know me knows I'm a minister who happens to be gay, I'm just me and if they can cope with me, I think you win people over.We're on a journey to justice and hope for all people and we haven't got there yet.I'm able to work in a place like this and be a gay minister and it doesn't really affect me that much. In previous generations people did get beaten up and [experience] all sorts of real problems.'Super accessible' Pride returns with town paradeFirst openly gay judge to lead LGBT veterans probeWhat is conversion therapy and will it be banned?It's important that we mark part of the year with Pride and say "we want to do better and we are proud of who we are".It is equally important that Pride happens in Parliament, doctor surgeries, police stations, schools.Things are changing but it's so slow. I want my three-year-old granddaughter to grow up in a fairer, kinder, more just world where these things don't matter.Whether you're LGBTQ+ matters as much as if you're Irish or Scottish, you're ginger or black, and the fact that those things still matter today is deeply disturbing.We're just normal, ordinary people who live quite boring lives with people who we love, the same as straight people do.Image source, Getty ImagesThe Methodist Church said it was "both heartbreaking and shaming" to hear of the way LGBT+ people have been treated in the past by the Methodist Church and apologised for what has taken place."We are a church that affirms and celebrates the participation and ministry of its LGBT+ members," a spokeswoman said.At the Methodist Church Conference last year, representatives voted in favour of banning conversion therapy, so no such therapy can take place in the name of the Methodist Church. Representatives also voted in favour of same-sex marriage in Methodist churches and buildings. "We will strive to be a fully inclusive and supporting church for all members and the communities we work in," the spokeswoman added.The Church of Pentecost was approached for comment.Story as told to Zoie O'Brien with additional reporting by Kate Scotter.Find BBC News: East of England on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected] Internet LinksWimpole Road Methodist ChurchThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

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Conversion therapy: 'I thought God hated me because I was gay'

Published2 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Jamie Niblock/BBCAs a young man, Joe Adams approached his Methodist minister and told him he was gay. Rather than being met with support and love, he was told he was "an abomination" and sent for conversion therapy.For years, he says, he lived as a "shadow" of his real self. Ordained at Birkenhead in 1999, by the time he came out in his 40s, Mr Adams was a married father-of-four. He feared he would lose both his family and his job. It did not happen - his family relationships grew stronger and he is now minister at the Wimpole Road Methodist Church in Colchester.Here, in his own words, the 57-year-old tells of his struggle with sexuality and of the "profound mental health damage" done to him during conversion therapy.I knew I was different in junior school.I didn't have many friends growing up partly because I felt so different. I came to faith when I was 18 - it was everything to me, it was a family, friends and a community.I told the Methodist minister there that I thought I was gay and he told me that "God can't love you, you're an abomination unto God and the only way you can be redeemed is if you are converted and changed to be straight".That was terrifying because he suggested I needed to leave and I couldn't leave, so I went along with it.Mr AdamsThey knocked me to the floor, they began hitting me, screaming for the devil to be removed from me and I was terrified."Reverend Joe AdamsMethodist MinisterHe sent me to a Pentecostal church and told me they were experts in conversion therapy. I walked up the stairs and there were three men who almost immediately started saying really nasty things.They knocked me to the floor, they began hitting me, screaming for the devil to be removed from me and I was terrified.After I can't remember how long, they ran out of steam. They put me on a chair and asked me if it worked, to which I replied "yes" as I wasn't daft and didn't want anymore. They told me my life would be better now I was straight and I just ran out of the room, to my car and just sat and cried for ages and ages, determined I would never tell anyone again.When I got back to my Methodist minister, he told me it wasn't over yet, in order for the transformation to be completed, I needed to find a nice woman, settle down, get married, have some children and the "gay would go away".It was awful, truly awful.Image source, The Adams FamilyI've only talked about it [the conversion therapy] during the last five years.It still hurts. It hurts to think that in many ways nothing's changed because if we don't have a ban on trans conversion therapy, and if we allow places of worship to have prayer and ministry that's coercive and manipulative, [then] nothing's changed.We wouldn't allow this level of bullying in any other sector of our life as a country and I don't really understand why we allow it for this, and the mental health harm it does to people.For the 30 years after I escaped that room there has been profound mental health damage.If you or someone you know is struggling with issues raised by this story, find support through BBC Action Line.I was ordained not long after and I have served in churches for 25 years and seen some amazing things and had some wonderful times, and it didn't matter how many hundreds of people were in the congregation, and how many times I said they were OK and God loved them, when I got home, I knew that God didn't love me. It was destroying me inside.Image source, Jamie Niblock/BBCIt disturbs me that that doesn't matter to people, that people think that's a price worth paying to control other people's lives.The pain of the blows didn't last that long but the words have stayed with me forever. I'm amazed I'm still alive because it's been such a difficult time but through it I had the privilege to be in love with my wife and we had some great times, and we have four children who I adore, but deep down it was hard for either of us to be really happy because of the burden of knowing I couldn't be what she needed and she couldn't be what I needed.It hurts that I lived so long thinking God hated me when I could've been living in the power of the love that I have found in churches. This church is so kind, so loving and I wish I had known this experience all those 30 years.It hurts that for so long I lived as a shadow.Image source, Joe AdamsWhen I came out in my late 40s, the assumption I made was that I would lose all of my family, that my four children wouldn't want to speak to me again and that I'd lose my job.None of those things happened.My relationships with my daughters and son are probably stronger than they've ever been and within the life of the church, the church is way more loving and kind and hopeful and graceful than I think that some people realise.Image source, Joe AdamsI've had tremendous support from Anglican and Methodist colleagues.Most people who know me knows I'm a minister who happens to be gay, I'm just me and if they can cope with me, I think you win people over.We're on a journey to justice and hope for all people and we haven't got there yet.I'm able to work in a place like this and be a gay minister and it doesn't really affect me that much. In previous generations people did get beaten up and [experience] all sorts of real problems.'Super accessible' Pride returns with town paradeFirst openly gay judge to lead LGBT veterans probeWhat is conversion therapy and will it be banned?It's important that we mark part of the year with Pride and say "we want to do better and we are proud of who we are".It is equally important that Pride happens in Parliament, doctor surgeries, police stations, schools.Things are changing but it's so slow. I want my three-year-old granddaughter to grow up in a fairer, kinder, more just world where these things don't matter.Whether you're LGBTQ+ matters as much as if you're Irish or Scottish, you're ginger or black, and the fact that those things still matter today is deeply disturbing.We're just normal, ordinary people who live quite boring lives with people who we love, the same as straight people do.Image source, Getty ImagesThe Methodist Church said it was "both heartbreaking and shaming" to hear of the way LGBT+ people have been treated in the past by the Methodist Church and apologised for what has taken place."We are a church that affirms and celebrates the participation and ministry of its LGBT+ members," a spokeswoman said.At the Methodist Church Conference last year, representatives voted in favour of banning conversion therapy, so no such therapy can take place in the name of the Methodist Church. Representatives also voted in favour of same-sex marriage in Methodist churches and buildings. "We will strive to be a fully inclusive and supporting church for all members and the communities we work in," the spokeswoman added.The Church of Pentecost was approached for comment.Story as told to Zoie O'Brien with additional reporting by Kate Scotter.Find BBC News: East of England on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected] Internet LinksWimpole Road Methodist ChurchThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

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Travis Barker thanks mother-in-law Kris Jenner for flowers after hospitalisation

Travis Barker has thanked his mother-in-law Kris Jenner for her well wishes and flowers as he continues to recover from his recent hospitalisation. he 46-year-old Blink 182 drummer confirmed he had been treated for “severe life-threatening pancreatitis”, and was pictured last week being carried into Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre in Los Angeles on a stretcher. Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas, a small organ located behind the stomach that helps with digestion. The musician, who married reality star Kourtney Kardashian in a private ceremony in Las Vegas in April, shared pictures of a bouquet from Jenner and her partner Corey Gamble to his Instagram story on Monday, expressing his thanks. Close The musician married reality star Kourtney Kardashian in a private ceremony in Las Vegas in April (Doug Peters/PA) PA The musician married reality star Kourtney Kardashian in a private ceremony in Las Vegas in April (Doug Peters/PA) The orange flowers carried a note that read: “Dearest Travis, get well soon. We love you, Kris and Corey.” Explaining his visit to the hospital, Barker said he had gone for an endoscopy “feeling great” but after dinner developed “excruciating pain” and had been receiving treatment ever since. He said: “During the endoscopy, I had a very small polyp removed right in a very sensitive area, usually handled by specialists, which unfortunately damaged a critical pancreatic drainage tube. “This resulted in severe life-threatening pancreatitis.” Barker added he was “so very, very grateful that with intensive treatment I am currently much better”. Kardashian also shared a statement online, describing the incident as “scary and emotional”. Close Barker’s mother-in-law Kris Jenner sent him flowers and well wishes following his hospitalisation (Ian West/PA) PA Barker’s mother-in-law Kris Jenner sent him flowers and well wishes following his hospitalisation (Ian West/PA) “Our health is everything and sometimes we take for granted how quickly it can change,” she wrote on Instagram. “Travis and I went in for a routine endoscopy together and he ended up with severe, life-threatening pancreatitis. “I am so grateful to God for healing my husband, for all of your prayers for him and for us, for the overwhelming outpouring of love and support. “I am so touched and appreciative.” Kardashian, who recently changed her surname on her official Instagram page to Barker-Kardashian, thanked the specialists, doctors and nurses at Cedars-Sinai for taking care of her husband and her during their stay. She added: “It’s crazy how sometimes words could never truly express the gratitude or feelings I have inside of me.” News that Barker had been admitted to hospital earlier this week prompted messages of support from the worlds of music and celebrity. His daughter Alabama, 16, thanked friends and fans for their “prayers and love”. Barker has two children with his ex-wife and model Shanna Moakler, a former Miss USA – 18-year-old Landon and Alabama.

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Travis Barker thanks mother-in-law Kris Jenner for flowers after hospitalisation

Travis Barker has thanked his mother-in-law Kris Jenner for her well wishes and flowers as he continues to recover from his recent hospitalisation. he 46-year-old Blink 182 drummer confirmed he had been treated for “severe life-threatening pancreatitis”, and was pictured last week being carried into Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre in Los Angeles on a stretcher. Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas, a small organ located behind the stomach that helps with digestion. The musician, who married reality star Kourtney Kardashian in a private ceremony in Las Vegas in April, shared pictures of a bouquet from Jenner and her partner Corey Gamble to his Instagram story on Monday, expressing his thanks. Close The musician married reality star Kourtney Kardashian in a private ceremony in Las Vegas in April (Doug Peters/PA) The musician married reality star Kourtney Kardashian in a private ceremony in Las Vegas in April (Doug Peters/PA) The orange flowers carried a note that read: “Dearest Travis, get well soon. We love you, Kris and Corey.” Explaining his visit to the hospital, Barker said he had gone for an endoscopy “feeling great” but after dinner developed “excruciating pain” and had been receiving treatment ever since. He said: “During the endoscopy, I had a very small polyp removed right in a very sensitive area, usually handled by specialists, which unfortunately damaged a critical pancreatic drainage tube. “This resulted in severe life-threatening pancreatitis.” Barker added he was “so very, very grateful that with intensive treatment I am currently much better”. Kardashian also shared a statement online, describing the incident as “scary and emotional”. Close Barker’s mother-in-law Kris Jenner sent him flowers and well wishes following his hospitalisation (Ian West/PA) Barker’s mother-in-law Kris Jenner sent him flowers and well wishes following his hospitalisation (Ian West/PA) Video of the Day “Our health is everything and sometimes we take for granted how quickly it can change,” she wrote on Instagram. “Travis and I went in for a routine endoscopy together and he ended up with severe, life-threatening pancreatitis. “I am so grateful to God for healing my husband, for all of your prayers for him and for us, for the overwhelming outpouring of love and support. “I am so touched and appreciative.” Kardashian, who recently changed her surname on her official Instagram page to Barker-Kardashian, thanked the specialists, doctors and nurses at Cedars-Sinai for taking care of her husband and her during their stay. She added: “It’s crazy how sometimes words could never truly express the gratitude or feelings I have inside of me.” News that Barker had been admitted to hospital earlier this week prompted messages of support from the worlds of music and celebrity. His daughter Alabama, 16, thanked friends and fans for their “prayers and love”. Barker has two children with his ex-wife and model Shanna Moakler, a former Miss USA – 18-year-old Landon and Alabama.

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Queen’s elite guard members ‘caught in cop sting plotting to sell ammo’

TWO members of the Queen’s elite guard were caught in a police sting plotting to sell ammo, a court has heard.Coldstream Guards Kirtland Gill, 41, and Rajon Graham, 33, allegedly planned to sell 300 bullets to drug dealers. Coldstream Guards Kirtland Gill, pictured, and Rajon Graham, allegedly planned to sell 300 bullets to drug dealersCredit: PA But their contact was an undercover cop, jurors heard. Duncan Atkinson QC, prosecuting, said phone records showed the soldiers were in contact with each other as deals took place and cash from the ammo sales was found at Gill’s home. Graham admits selling and conspiring to sell the ammo. Quartermaster Gill, the regiment’s first black Regimental Sergeant Major, denies conspiracy. .css-16e4f55{margin:16px 0;}.css-1crassg{background-color:rgba(238,243,250,1);margin:16px 0;}.css-1tapza8{padding:20px 15px;}.css-1bk4jdt{padding:20px 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.nk-headline-heading{color:rgba(71,30,121,1);}.css-1uyse24:before{content:'';top:0;right:0;bottom:0;left:0;overflow:hidden;position:absolute;z-index:1;}.css-9fn9bm{border-width:0 1px 1px 1px;border-style:solid;border-color:rgba(160,195,229,1);padding:12px;max-height:104px;min-height:98px;}.css-1i221q{padding:0;border-width:0 1px 1px 1px;border-style:solid;border-color:rgba(160,195,229,1);padding:12px;max-height:104px;min-height:98px;}.css-124tga5{overflow:hidden;-webkit-line-clamp:3;-webkit-box-orient:vertical;display:-webkit-box;word-wrap:break-word;line-height:1;}.css-5jzxpx{overflow:hidden;-webkit-line-clamp:3;-webkit-box-orient:vertical;display:-webkit-box;word-wrap:break-word;line-height:1;}.css-dl8m2g{margin:0;padding:0;color:rgba(43,92,140,1);text-transform:uppercase;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;font-family:The Sun;font-size:18px;line-height:1.333;font-weight:700;letter-spacing:0%;font-stretch:normal;display:inline;}.css-dl8m2g:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}FREE CASH .css-8h3gc3{margin:0;padding:0;color:rgba(34,37,38,1);-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;font-family:The Sun;font-size:18px;line-height:1.333;font-weight:700;letter-spacing:0%;font-stretch:normal;display:inline;}.css-8h3gc3:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}How to get £200 supermarket vouchers for food and essentials Both men are based in Windsor, Berkshire. The trial at Southwark crown court continues. .css-qu9fel{border-top:1px solid #dcdddd;}.css-b9nmbi{margin-bottom:16px;border-top:1px solid #dcdddd;}.css-1qsre5o{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;height:100%;-webkit-align-items:flex-start;-webkit-box-align:flex-start;-ms-flex-align:flex-start;align-items:flex-start;-webkit-align-content:flex-start;-ms-flex-line-pack:flex-start;align-content:flex-start;-webkit-box-flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-wrap:nowrap;-ms-flex-wrap:nowrap;flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-direction:column;-ms-flex-direction:column;flex-direction:column;-webkit-box-pack:justify;-webkit-justify-content:space-between;justify-content:space-between;}.css-q8gelu{margin-bottom:24px;}.css-7ysxcx{padding:0;text-transform:uppercase;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-7ysxcx:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-jkwlot{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;height:100%;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;-webkit-flex-direction:row;-ms-flex-direction:row;flex-direction:row;-webkit-box-pack:justify;-webkit-justify-content:space-between;justify-content:space-between;padding:0;text-transform:uppercase;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-jkwlot:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-1x7hydu{font-family:The Sun;font-size:24px;line-height:1.1666666666666667;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:0%;font-stretch:semi-condensed;padding:1px 0px;}.css-1x7hydu::before{content:'';display:block;height:0;width:0;margin-bottom:calc(-0.24520833333333342em + -0.5px);}.css-1x7hydu::after{content:'';display:block;height:0;width:0;margin-top:-0.2333333333333334em;}.css-1lobn43{display:inline;font:inherit;margin:0;color:rgba(0,0,0,1);}.css-1lobn43 svg{fill:rgba(0,0,0,1);}Most read in News.css-1gojmfd{margin-bottom:16px;}.css-zdjvqv{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;height:100%;-webkit-align-items:flex-start;-webkit-box-align:flex-start;-ms-flex-align:flex-start;align-items:flex-start;-webkit-align-content:flex-start;-ms-flex-line-pack:flex-start;align-content:flex-start;-webkit-box-flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-wrap:nowrap;-ms-flex-wrap:nowrap;flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-direction:column;-ms-flex-direction:column;flex-direction:column;-webkit-box-pack:space-around;-ms-flex-pack:space-around;-webkit-justify-content:space-around;justify-content:space-around;margin-top:calc(-12px/2);margin-bottom:calc(-12px/2);}.css-zdjvqv:before,.css-zdjvqv:after{content:'';display:block;}.css-1meuhfk{display:-webkit-inline-box;display:-webkit-inline-flex;display:-ms-inline-flexbox;display:inline-flex;margin-top:calc(12px/2);margin-bottom:calc(12px/2);}

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Queen’s elite guard members ‘caught in cop sting plotting to sell ammo’

TWO members of the Queen’s elite guard were caught in a police sting plotting to sell ammo, a court has heard.Coldstream Guards Kirtland Gill, 41, and Rajon Graham, 33, allegedly planned to sell 300 bullets to drug dealers. 1Coldstream Guards Kirtland Gill, pictured, and Rajon Graham, allegedly planned to sell 300 bullets to drug dealersCredit: PA But their contact was an undercover cop, jurors heard. Duncan Atkinson QC, prosecuting, said phone records showed the soldiers were in contact with each other as deals took place and cash from the ammo sales was found at Gill’s home. Graham admits selling and conspiring to sell the ammo. Quartermaster Gill, the regiment’s first black Regimental Sergeant Major, denies conspiracy. Both men are based in Windsor, Berkshire. The trial at Southwark crown court continues. Most read in News

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Queen’s elite guard members ‘caught in cop sting plotting to sell ammo’

TWO members of the Queen’s elite guard were caught in a police sting plotting to sell ammo, a court has heard.Coldstream Guards Kirtland Gill, 41, and Rajon Graham, 33, allegedly planned to sell 300 bullets to drug dealers. Coldstream Guards Kirtland Gill, pictured, and Rajon Graham, allegedly planned to sell 300 bullets to drug dealersCredit: PA But their contact was an undercover cop, jurors heard. Duncan Atkinson QC, prosecuting, said phone records showed the soldiers were in contact with each other as deals took place and cash from the ammo sales was found at Gill’s home. Graham admits selling and conspiring to sell the ammo. Quartermaster Gill, the regiment’s first black Regimental Sergeant Major, denies conspiracy. .css-16e4f55{margin:16px 0;}.css-1crassg{background-color:rgba(238,243,250,1);margin:16px 0;}.css-1tapza8{padding:20px 15px;}.css-1bk4jdt{padding:20px 15px;}.css-1qsre5o{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;height:100%;-webkit-align-items:flex-start;-webkit-box-align:flex-start;-ms-flex-align:flex-start;align-items:flex-start;-webkit-align-content:flex-start;-ms-flex-line-pack:flex-start;align-content:flex-start;-webkit-box-flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-wrap:nowrap;-ms-flex-wrap:nowrap;flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-direction:column;-ms-flex-direction:column;flex-direction:column;-webkit-box-pack:justify;-webkit-justify-content:space-between;justify-content:space-between;}.css-16djrfc{overflow:hidden;-webkit-line-clamp:1;-webkit-box-orient:vertical;display:-webkit-box;word-wrap:break-word;padding-top:2px;}.css-1skzs3j{overflow:hidden;-webkit-line-clamp:1;-webkit-box-orient:vertical;display:-webkit-box;word-wrap:break-word;padding-top:2px;}.css-7ysxcx{padding:0;text-transform:uppercase;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-7ysxcx:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-jkwlot{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;height:100%;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;-webkit-flex-direction:row;-ms-flex-direction:row;flex-direction:row;-webkit-box-pack:justify;-webkit-justify-content:space-between;justify-content:space-between;padding:0;text-transform:uppercase;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-jkwlot:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-1x7hydu{font-family:The Sun;font-size:24px;line-height:1.1666666666666667;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:0%;font-stretch:semi-condensed;padding:1px 0px;}.css-1x7hydu::before{content:'';display:block;height:0;width:0;margin-bottom:calc(-0.24520833333333342em + -0.5px);}.css-1x7hydu::after{content:'';display:block;height:0;width:0;margin-top:-0.2333333333333334em;}.css-1lobn43{display:inline;font:inherit;margin:0;color:rgba(0,0,0,1);}.css-1lobn43 svg{fill:rgba(0,0,0,1);}Read More on The Sun.css-1gojmfd{margin-bottom:16px;}.css-gmec1d{display:-webkit-inline-box;display:-webkit-inline-flex;display:-ms-inline-flexbox;display:inline-flex;height:auto;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;-webkit-align-content:center;-ms-flex-line-pack:center;align-content:center;-webkit-box-flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-wrap:nowrap;-ms-flex-wrap:nowrap;flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-direction:row;-ms-flex-direction:row;flex-direction:row;-webkit-box-pack:start;-ms-flex-pack:start;-webkit-justify-content:flex-start;justify-content:flex-start;margin-left:calc(-20px/2);margin-right:calc(-20px/2);}.css-fh9577{display:-webkit-inline-box;display:-webkit-inline-flex;display:-ms-inline-flexbox;display:inline-flex;margin-left:calc(20px/2);margin-right:calc(20px/2);}.css-65fvqt{max-width:302px;max-height:294px;}.css-s4x7g2{box-sizing:border-box;overflow:hidden;background-color:rgba(238,243,250,1);-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;position:relative;display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-webkit-flex-direction:column;-ms-flex-direction:column;flex-direction:column;max-width:302px;max-height:294px;}.css-bk55po{box-sizing:border-box;display:block;position:relative;margin-bottom:0;}.css-1shocxe{box-sizing:border-box;}.css-1a2irou{box-sizing:border-box;padding:0;}.css-1a2irou a:not(.nk-card-link){z-index:2;position:relative;}.css-1uyse24{-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;border:none;}.css-1uyse24 .nk-headline-kicker{color:rgba(0,114,238,1);}.css-1uyse24:hover:not(:disabled) .nk-headline-kicker{color:rgba(0,86,180,1);-webkit-text-decoration:underline;text-decoration:underline;}.css-1uyse24:active:not(:disabled) .nk-headline-kicker{color:rgba(0,62,129,1);-webkit-text-decoration:underline;text-decoration:underline;}.css-1uyse24:visited:not(:disabled) .nk-headline-kicker{color:rgba(71,30,121,1);}.css-1uyse24 .nk-headline-heading{color:rgba(34,37,38,1);}.css-1uyse24:hover:not(:disabled) .nk-headline-heading{color:rgba(0,86,180,1);-webkit-text-decoration:underline;text-decoration:underline;}.css-1uyse24:active:not(:disabled) .nk-headline-heading{color:rgba(0,62,129,1);-webkit-text-decoration:underline;text-decoration:underline;}.css-1uyse24:visited:not(:disabled) .nk-headline-heading{color:rgba(71,30,121,1);}.css-1uyse24:before{content:'';top:0;right:0;bottom:0;left:0;overflow:hidden;position:absolute;z-index:1;}.css-9fn9bm{border-width:0 1px 1px 1px;border-style:solid;border-color:rgba(160,195,229,1);padding:12px;max-height:104px;min-height:98px;}.css-1i221q{padding:0;border-width:0 1px 1px 1px;border-style:solid;border-color:rgba(160,195,229,1);padding:12px;max-height:104px;min-height:98px;}.css-124tga5{overflow:hidden;-webkit-line-clamp:3;-webkit-box-orient:vertical;display:-webkit-box;word-wrap:break-word;line-height:1;}.css-5jzxpx{overflow:hidden;-webkit-line-clamp:3;-webkit-box-orient:vertical;display:-webkit-box;word-wrap:break-word;line-height:1;}.css-dl8m2g{margin:0;padding:0;color:rgba(43,92,140,1);text-transform:uppercase;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;font-family:The Sun;font-size:18px;line-height:1.333;font-weight:700;letter-spacing:0%;font-stretch:normal;display:inline;}.css-dl8m2g:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}FREE CASH .css-8h3gc3{margin:0;padding:0;color:rgba(34,37,38,1);-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;font-family:The Sun;font-size:18px;line-height:1.333;font-weight:700;letter-spacing:0%;font-stretch:normal;display:inline;}.css-8h3gc3:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}How to get £200 supermarket vouchers for food and essentials Both men are based in Windsor, Berkshire. The trial at Southwark crown court continues. .css-qu9fel{border-top:1px solid #dcdddd;}.css-b9nmbi{margin-bottom:16px;border-top:1px solid #dcdddd;}.css-1qsre5o{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;height:100%;-webkit-align-items:flex-start;-webkit-box-align:flex-start;-ms-flex-align:flex-start;align-items:flex-start;-webkit-align-content:flex-start;-ms-flex-line-pack:flex-start;align-content:flex-start;-webkit-box-flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-wrap:nowrap;-ms-flex-wrap:nowrap;flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-direction:column;-ms-flex-direction:column;flex-direction:column;-webkit-box-pack:justify;-webkit-justify-content:space-between;justify-content:space-between;}.css-q8gelu{margin-bottom:24px;}.css-7ysxcx{padding:0;text-transform:uppercase;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-7ysxcx:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-jkwlot{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;height:100%;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;-webkit-flex-direction:row;-ms-flex-direction:row;flex-direction:row;-webkit-box-pack:justify;-webkit-justify-content:space-between;justify-content:space-between;padding:0;text-transform:uppercase;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-jkwlot:hover:not(:disabled){-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-1x7hydu{font-family:The Sun;font-size:24px;line-height:1.1666666666666667;font-weight:400;letter-spacing:0%;font-stretch:semi-condensed;padding:1px 0px;}.css-1x7hydu::before{content:'';display:block;height:0;width:0;margin-bottom:calc(-0.24520833333333342em + -0.5px);}.css-1x7hydu::after{content:'';display:block;height:0;width:0;margin-top:-0.2333333333333334em;}.css-1lobn43{display:inline;font:inherit;margin:0;color:rgba(0,0,0,1);}.css-1lobn43 svg{fill:rgba(0,0,0,1);}Most read in News.css-1gojmfd{margin-bottom:16px;}.css-zdjvqv{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;height:100%;-webkit-align-items:flex-start;-webkit-box-align:flex-start;-ms-flex-align:flex-start;align-items:flex-start;-webkit-align-content:flex-start;-ms-flex-line-pack:flex-start;align-content:flex-start;-webkit-box-flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-wrap:nowrap;-ms-flex-wrap:nowrap;flex-wrap:nowrap;-webkit-flex-direction:column;-ms-flex-direction:column;flex-direction:column;-webkit-box-pack:space-around;-ms-flex-pack:space-around;-webkit-justify-content:space-around;justify-content:space-around;margin-top:calc(-12px/2);margin-bottom:calc(-12px/2);}.css-zdjvqv:before,.css-zdjvqv:after{content:'';display:block;}.css-1meuhfk{display:-webkit-inline-box;display:-webkit-inline-flex;display:-ms-inline-flexbox;display:inline-flex;margin-top:calc(12px/2);margin-bottom:calc(12px/2);}

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航空機内のマスク着用巡るトラブル多発 海外ではCAに暴行被害も

 国内外の航空需要の回復で、飛行機の中でのマスク着用をめぐるトラブルが増加しそうだ。ワクチン接種率向上で国際的に出入国規制が緩和に向かう中、アメリカの航空各社のように機内でマスク着用義務が撤廃されるケースも出てきた。 日本国内でも新型コロナウイルスに対する警戒感が薄れ、マスクを着用しない状態で搭乗することを求める乗客も増加しているという。一方、日本の航空会社はマスク着用(あるいは、フェイスシールドなどの代用品)は「必須」としつつも、マスクをしていないというだけでは搭乗拒否まで要求する権限はない。

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UK News - The Independent » Top Stories RSS Feed

Sydney floods impact 45,000 around Australia's largest city

Hundreds of homes have been inundated in and around Australia's largest city in a flood emergency that was threatening 45,000 people, officials said on Tuesday.Emergency response teams made 100 rescues overnight of people trapped in cars on flooded roads or in inundated homes in the Sydney area, State Emergency Service manager Ashley Sullivan said.Days of torrential rain have caused dams to overflow and waterways to break their banks, bringing a fourth flood emergency since March last year to parts of the city of 5 million people.The New South Wales state government declared a disaster zone across more 20 local government areas overnight, activating federal government financial assistance for flood victims.Evacuation orders and warnings to prepare to abandon homes impacted 45,000 people as of Tuesday, up from 32,000 on Monday, Sullivan said.“The weather is meant to stick around for at least today and tomorrow, and the threat will remain with those flood warnings for the rest of this week,” Sullivan told Nine Network television.Parts of southern Sydney had been lashed by more than 20 centimeters (nearly 8 inches) of rain in 24 hours, more than 17% of the city’s annual average, Bureau of Meteorology meteorologist Jonathan How said.Severe weather warnings of heavy rain remained in place across Sydney’s eastern suburbs on Tuesday. The warnings also extended north of Sydney along the coast and into the Hunter Valley.The worst flooding was along the Hawkesbury-Nepean rivers system along Sydney’s northern and western fringes.“The good news is that by tomorrow afternoon, it is looking to be mostly dry but, of course, we are reminding people that these floodwaters will remain very high well after the rain has stopped,” How said.“There was plenty of rain fall overnight and that is actually seeing some rivers peak for a second time. So you’ve got to take many days, if not a week, to start to see these floodwaters start to recede,” How added.The wild weather and mountainous seas along the New South Wales coast thwarted plans to tow a stricken cargo ship with 21 crew members aboard to the safety of open sea.The ship lost power after leaving port in Wollongong, south of Sydney, on Monday morning and risked being grounded by 8-meter (26-foot) swells and winds blowing at 30 knots (34 mph) against cliffs.An attempt to tow the ship with tugboats into open ocean ended when a towline snapped late Monday, Port Authority chief executive Philip Holliday said.The ship was maintaining its position on Tuesday farther from the coast than it had been on Monday with two anchors and the help of two tugboats. The new plan was to tow the ship to Sydney when weather and sea conditions calmed as early as Wednesday, Holliday said. The original plan had been for the ship’s crew to repair their engine at sea.“We’re in a better position than we were yesterday,” Holliday said. “We’re in relative safety.”

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UK News - The Independent » Top Stories RSS Feed

Sydney floods impact 45,000 around Australia's largest city

Hundreds of homes have been inundated in and around Australia's largest city in a flood emergency that was threatening 45,000 people, officials said on Tuesday.Emergency response teams made 100 rescues overnight of people trapped in cars on flooded roads or in inundated homes in the Sydney area, State Emergency Service manager Ashley Sullivan said.Days of torrential rain have caused dams to overflow and waterways to break their banks, bringing a fourth flood emergency since March last year to parts of the city of 5 million people.The New South Wales state government declared a disaster zone across more 20 local government areas overnight, activating federal government financial assistance for flood victims.Evacuation orders and warnings to prepare to abandon homes impacted 45,000 people as of Tuesday, up from 32,000 on Monday, Sullivan said.“The weather is meant to stick around for at least today and tomorrow, and the threat will remain with those flood warnings for the rest of this week,” Sullivan told Nine Network television.Parts of southern Sydney had been lashed by more than 20 centimeters (nearly 8 inches) of rain in 24 hours, more than 17% of the city’s annual average, Bureau of Meteorology meteorologist Jonathan How said.Severe weather warnings of heavy rain remained in place across Sydney’s eastern suburbs on Tuesday. The warnings also extended north of Sydney along the coast and into the Hunter Valley.The worst flooding was along the Hawkesbury-Nepean rivers system along Sydney’s northern and western fringes.“The good news is that by tomorrow afternoon, it is looking to be mostly dry but, of course, we are reminding people that these floodwaters will remain very high well after the rain has stopped,” How said.“There was plenty of rain fall overnight and that is actually seeing some rivers peak for a second time. So you’ve got to take many days, if not a week, to start to see these floodwaters start to recede,” How added.The wild weather and mountainous seas along the New South Wales coast thwarted plans to tow a stricken cargo ship with 21 crew members aboard to the safety of open sea.The ship lost power after leaving port in Wollongong, south of Sydney, on Monday morning and risked being grounded by 8-meter (26-foot) swells and winds blowing at 30 knots (34 mph) against cliffs.An attempt to tow the ship with tugboats into open ocean ended when a towline snapped late Monday, Port Authority chief executive Philip Holliday said.The ship was maintaining its position on Tuesday farther from the coast than it had been on Monday with two anchors and the help of two tugboats. The new plan was to tow the ship to Sydney when weather and sea conditions calmed as early as Wednesday, Holliday said. The original plan had been for the ship’s crew to repair their engine at sea.“We’re in a better position than we were yesterday,” Holliday said. “We’re in relative safety.”

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Eilish McColgan to debut at London Marathon 26 years after mother’s win

Scottish distance runner Eilish McColgan will debut at the London Marathon this year, 26 years after her mother, Liz McColgan, won the race. n recent years, McColgan has set new British records for the five kilometre, 10 kilometre and 10 mile races, creating anticipation for her first competitive marathon. She will be up against world record holder Brigid Kosgei, defending champion Joyciline Jepkosgei and British number one Charlotte Purdue in the elite women’s field on October 2. McColgan said she has been preparing for years. I don’t actually remember the race myself, but I’ve seen the finish many times down the years. I’m now looking forward to experiencing it for myselfEilish McColgan “I’ve been looking forward and planning the step up to the marathon distance over the past number of years and this year’s London Marathon comes at the perfect time after a busy summer on the track. “Obviously, the London Marathon holds a very special place in the heart of my family with my mum’s win in 1996. “I don’t actually remember the race myself, but I’ve seen the finish many times down the years. I’m now looking forward to experiencing it for myself.”

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