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Day: 5 July 2022

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Ellie Goulding's Facebook posts for alcohol brand banned

Adverts for an alcohol brand shared on Ellie Goulding's Facebook page have been banned after the singer claimed the drink is low in calories and contains no sugar.The Love Me Like You Do singer, who is a founder and co-owner of Served Drinks, posted two ads for the alcoholic sparkling water on her Facebook page in February. "If you're like me, you love a drink but also enjoy an active lifestyle. My delicious alcoholic sparkling water is the best of both worlds," the first said.The second read: "You guys know I love a drink, but I also really care about my well-being. Since I launched my alcoholic sparkling water there is no going back for me!"A video showed Goulding saying: "I love a drink, as I talk about a lot on my social media, but I also care about my health ... That's why I want to tell you about my new drink Served. So, my new drink Served is a hard seltzer, it has 57 calories..." Advertisement Further text in the posts stated: "57 cals ... 4% vol." A separate email from Served Drinks, seen on 18 January, read: "Forget Dry January ... Is dry January becoming a little dry? There's no reason you can't enjoy a drink without setting you back! Our drinks only have 57 calories, 0g sugar and are 4% ABV and are the perfect choice for a tipple without all the guilt." More on Ellie Goulding Related Topics: The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) received 21 complaints about the brand's advertising, including that the calorie and sugar content statements were nutritional claims that are not permitted for alcoholic drinks, and that Goulding's statement that she loves a drink while also enjoying an active lifestyle and caring about her wellbeing are general health claims that are also not allowed for alcoholic drinks.Some complained the email ad suggested drinking alcohol might be indispensable and could overcome boredom by encouraging people to break Dry January.Served Drinks said it understood advertisers are allowed to provide factual information about the nutritional content of their products, including the calorific content, provided there is no suggestion the drink has the particular beneficial property of being low in calories. They said the posts on Goulding's Facebook page were intended to describe her lifestyle and what is important to her and could not reasonably be interpreted as being about the product itself, and were therefore not general health claims.The ASA said: "Because the ads included nutrition claims that the product was low in calories and contained no sugar, which were not permitted nutrition claims for alcohol products, we concluded that they breached the Code."It ruled the three ads must not appear again in their current form, adding: "We told Served Drinks not to make health claims, or non-permitted nutrition claims, about alcoholic drinks or imply that alcohol could overcome boredom in their advertising." Served Drinks said: "We are committed to responsible advertising, and we work closely with organisations such as CAP (the Committee of Advertising Practice) in the development of campaign materials."While we are disappointed that the complaints were upheld in part, we respect the ASA's ruling. All ads were removed immediately and will not feature again."

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夏のセール開始 買うと後悔するファッションアイテムとは

―[メンズファッションバイヤーMB]―  メンズファッションバイヤー&ブロガーのMBです。洋服の買いつけの傍ら、「男のおしゃれ」についても執筆しています。連載第385回目をよろしくお願いします。◆「セールで買ってはいけないもの」の特徴 いよいよ7月になり夏のセールが一斉に始まりました! 新宿伊勢丹クリアランスセール初日には大勢のお客様がグルリと建物を囲んで行列していたそうで、盛り上がりを感じさせます。

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A one-off Bob Dylan recording could sell for £1m

Published3 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, PA MediaA one-off Bob Dylan record is expected to fetch up to £1m when it is auctioned at Christie's on Thursday.The disc features a new version of the star's classic song Blowin' In The Wind, made in March 2021 with his long-time collaborator T Bone Burnett. "It felt holy," he tells BBC News. "It always feels holy for me, playing with Bob - and I think we did it in one take, if I'm not mistaken."It is the first new studio recording of the song since Dylan wrote it in 1962.The one-off release also showcases a new type of record that combines some of the materials used in CDs and vinyl, and promises better sound quality and durability than vinyl.Playable on any regular turntable, the new format is described as "the pinnacle of sound" by Burnett, who helped develop it.Ultimately, only one deep-pocketed Dylan fan will get to own the new version of Blowin' In The Wind. However, fans can go to Christie's in London to hear the record before it is sold.Image source, Joshua WhiteThere, they will be ushered into a sedate side-room of the auction house, where the 10-inch disc is handled with silk gloves before being placed on a £30,000 hi-fi system. Listening on headphones, the warmth and precision of the sound is immediately apparent, save for a few pops and cracks (maybe four in total) attributable to dust or static on the surface of the record.Dylan's voice is smooth and dextrous throughout, having benefitted from an extended break in touring during the Covid-19 pandemic. When it appears, his characteristic rasp only adds to the weight of the lyrics, which are inextricably linked to the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Lines like, "How many times can a man turn his head / and pretend that he just doesn't see?" resonate harder than ever when sung from the perspective of an 81-year-old who's witnessed history repeat decade after decade after decade.As a result, the song becomes more contemplative, a rumination on our failures. Dylan stretches out his syllables as though he's contemplating every line anew; taking almost a minute longer to reach the song's conclusion.Unlike the original, the 2021 re-recording features a full band, recorded live in the studio as Dylan sang. Their subtle and sympathetic arrangement - with Greg Leisz on mandolin and Don Was on bass - adds a new dimension to the song, without stealing focus from the message.It almost seems a shame that, in the words of the Christie's catalogue, "this is the only copy of Bob Dylan's 2021 recording,.... that will ever be manufactured. No other versions of this recording will be released or sold"."We're only making one because we view this work as the equivalent of an oil painting," says Burnett, who is best known for his Grammy-winning work on Raising Sand by Alison Kraus and Robert Plant, as well as the soundtracks for O Brother, Where Art Thou? and The Big Lebowski.Bob Dylan sells his master recordings to Sony Music80 things you may not know about Bob DylanDylan 'beyond words' over Nobel Prize He hopes that future releases in the format will "help develop a music space in the fine arts", allowing artists to combat "the devaluing of our work by the commoditisation of the internet"."I don't know what an original recording of Bob Dylan singing one of the most important songs of the last century is [worth] today, but I know it's not point $0.001 divided by 5 billion, which is the reality that musicians face now."The exclusivity of the new recording has informed its estimated sale price of between £600,000 and £1 million. Peter Klarnet, Christie's senior specialist in Americana, says it was hard to calculate an estimate, as nothing of this nature has ever been sold before. The closest analogy is the Wu-Tang Clan album Once Upon a Time in Shaolin, which was limited to a single CD copy in 2015.That record was initially bought by hedge fund manager Martin Shkreli for an unspecified sum. When he was later convicted of fraud, the US Department of Justice re-sold the album for a reported $4m (£3.35m), making it the most expensive work of music ever sold.Klarnet says the Dylan record is unlikely to top that sum, but suggests his initial estimate is on the conservative side.Image source, Getty ImagesMeanwhile, Burnett is enthused by the potential of his new physical audio format - known as an Ionic Original.Announced in April, it consists of "lacquer painted onto an aluminium disc, with a spiral etched into it by music". This is essentially the same technology that the music industry has used for decades to create test pressings, known as acetates or dubplates.Musicians generally agree that these acetates sound better than vinyl - but they degrade quickly, as the force of the needle pushing into the groove melts the lacquer."So we started looking into what they use on the Space Station to shield it from the direct light of the sun," says Burnett. "And we've been able to coat the acetate with that, and it removes enough friction that the acetate doesn't degrade over thousands of plays."He says the coating - made from a gradient of sapphire and quartz - also reduces the crackle associated with vinyl."Friction creates static electricity, which attracts dust, which causes pops," he explains. "So with this coating removing friction, if some dust does land on the needle, it cleans it out. So the discs are essentially self-cleaning."At the time of writing, the discs cannot be mass produced, meaning they are likely to remain collector's items and investment opportunities for now. But Burnett hopes they will be more widely adapted in the future."I don't look at this as a replacement for anything," he says. "I just look at it as another arrow in the quiver for every musician in the world [and] a whole new way of earning a living that we've never had before."This isn't Burnett's first venture into audio formats. In 2008, he developed a hi-fidelity technology known as ΧΟΔΕ (or Code), which allowed listeners to play "studio quality" recordings from a DVD player. Releases on the format included John Mellencamp's Life, Death, Love and Freedom - but the format died out relatively quickly.Follow us on Facebook, or on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected] on this storyBob Dylan sells his master recordings to Sony Music24 January80 things you may not know about Bob Dylan24 May 2021Dylan 'beyond words' over Nobel Prize11 December 2016

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BBC News

A one-off Bob Dylan recording could sell for £1m

Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, PA MediaA one-off Bob Dylan record is expected to fetch up to £1m when it is auctioned at Christie's on Thursday.The disc features a new version of the star's classic song Blowin' In The Wind, made in March 2021 with his long-time collaborator T Bone Burnett. "It felt holy," he tells BBC News. "It always feels holy for me, playing with Bob - and I think we did it in one take, if I'm not mistaken."It is the first new studio recording of the song since Dylan wrote it in 1962.The one-off release also showcases a new type of record that combines some of the materials used in CDs and vinyl, and promises better sound quality and durability than vinyl.Playable on any regular turntable, the new format is described as "the pinnacle of sound" by Burnett, who helped develop it.Ultimately, only one deep-pocketed Dylan fan will get to own the new version of Blowin' In The Wind. However, fans can go to Christie's in London to hear the record before it is sold.Image source, Joshua WhiteThere, they will be ushered into a sedate side-room of the auction house, where the 10-inch disc is handled with silk gloves before being placed on a £30,000 hi-fi system. Listening on headphones, the warmth and precision of the sound is immediately apparent, save for a few pops and cracks (maybe four in total) attributable to dust or static on the surface of the record.Dylan's voice is smooth and dextrous throughout, having benefitted from an extended break in touring during the Covid-19 pandemic. When it appears, his characteristic rasp only adds to the weight of the lyrics, which are inextricably linked to the civil rights movement of the 1960s. Lines like, "How many times can a man turn his head / and pretend that he just doesn't see?" resonate harder than ever when sung from the perspective of an 81-year-old who's witnessed history repeat decade after decade after decade.As a result, the song becomes more contemplative, a rumination on our failures. Dylan stretches out his syllables as though he's contemplating every line anew; taking almost a minute longer to reach the song's conclusion.Unlike the original, the 2021 re-recording features a full band, recorded live in the studio as Dylan sang. Their subtle and sympathetic arrangement - with Greg Leisz on mandolin and Don Was on bass - adds a new dimension to the song, without stealing focus from the message.It almost seems a shame that, in the words of the Christie's catalogue, "this is the only copy of Bob Dylan's 2021 recording,.... that will ever be manufactured. No other versions of this recording will be released or sold"."We're only making one because we view this work as the equivalent of an oil painting," says Burnett, who is best known for his Grammy-winning work on Raising Sand by Alison Kraus and Robert Plant, as well as the soundtracks for O Brother, Where Art Thou? and The Big Lebowski.Bob Dylan sells his master recordings to Sony Music80 things you may not know about Bob DylanDylan 'beyond words' over Nobel Prize He hopes that future releases in the format will "help develop a music space in the fine arts", allowing artists to combat "the devaluing of our work by the commoditisation of the internet"."I don't know what an original recording of Bob Dylan singing one of the most important songs of the last century is [worth] today, but I know it's not point $0.001 divided by 5 billion, which is the reality that musicians face now."The exclusivity of the new recording has informed its estimated sale price of between £600,000 and £1 million. Peter Klarnet, Christie's senior specialist in Americana, says it was hard to calculate an estimate, as nothing of this nature has ever been sold before. The closest analogy is the Wu-Tang Clan album Once Upon a Time in Shaolin, which was limited to a single CD copy in 2015.That record was initially bought by hedge fund manager Martin Shkreli for an unspecified sum. When he was later convicted of fraud, the US Department of Justice re-sold the album for a reported $4m (£3.35m), making it the most expensive work of music ever sold.Klarnet says the Dylan record is unlikely to top that sum, but suggests his initial estimate is on the conservative side.Image source, Getty ImagesMeanwhile, Burnett is enthused by the potential of his new physical audio format - known as an Ionic Original.Announced in April, it consists of "lacquer painted onto an aluminium disc, with a spiral etched into it by music". This is essentially the same technology that the music industry has used for decades to create test pressings, known as acetates or dubplates.Musicians generally agree that these acetates sound better than vinyl - but they degrade quickly, as the force of the needle pushing into the groove melts the lacquer."So we started looking into what they use on the Space Station to shield it from the direct light of the sun," says Burnett. "And we've been able to coat the acetate with that, and it removes enough friction that the acetate doesn't degrade over thousands of plays."He says the coating - made from a gradient of sapphire and quartz - also reduces the crackle associated with vinyl."Friction creates static electricity, which attracts dust, which causes pops," he explains. "So with this coating removing friction, if some dust does land on the needle, it cleans it out. So the discs are essentially self-cleaning."At the time of writing, the discs cannot be mass produced, meaning they are likely to remain collector's items and investment opportunities for now. But Burnett hopes they will be more widely adapted in the future."I don't look at this as a replacement for anything," he says. "I just look at it as another arrow in the quiver for every musician in the world [and] a whole new way of earning a living that we've never had before."This isn't Burnett's first venture into audio formats. In 2008, he developed a hi-fidelity technology known as ΧΟΔΕ (or Code), which allowed listeners to play "studio quality" recordings from a DVD player. Releases on the format included John Mellencamp's Life, Death, Love and Freedom - but the format died out relatively quickly.Follow us on Facebook, or on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected] on this storyBob Dylan sells his master recordings to Sony Music24 January80 things you may not know about Bob Dylan24 May 2021Dylan 'beyond words' over Nobel Prize11 December 2016

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Tech firms told to do better on child abuse images

Published3 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesThe government is giving Ofcom extra tools to ensure tech companies act to prevent, identify and remove child sexual abuse and exploitation content.The powers will be introduced through an amendment to the Online Safety Bill, which aims to police the internet.If the tech firms do not comply, Ofcom will be able to impose fines of up to £18m or 10% of the company's global annual turnover, whichever is higher.However there is growing concern over how it will work in practice.There are questions over what exactly the extra tools are that media regulator Ofcom will get.And one of the main concerns surrounds the popular end-to-end encryption (E2EE) or ultra-secure messaging - such as WhatsApp and Signal - and how that might be infiltrated.The government says it is supporting the development of tools which could detect child sexual abuse imagery content within or around an E2EE environment, while respecting user privacy. It says this will further inform the wider debate around user privacy and user safety.But Prof Alan Woodward from the University of Surrey told the BBC that to detect child abuse imagery or associated text, the current techniques will only work on unencrypted data. "If the OSB insists on discovering such material in encrypted data, it can be achieved only by examining the sending and receiving devices, i.e. where it is decrypted for consumption."The implication is some form of universal 'client-side scanning' which many will see as overly intrusive and liable to... be used to detect other items unrelated to child safety."Client-side scanning refers to technology that scan message contents for matches against a database of content (for example child sexual abuse images) before the message is sent to the intended recipient.If Ofcom gets the powers to impose scanning technologies, there are calls from experts for the government to flesh out the detail on the technical feasibility, security implications and impact on privacy. Experts say there is no way to make scanning technologies work for "good' purposes" only."The big issue will be that any technology that can be used to look at what is otherwise encrypted could be misused by bad actors to conduct surveillance," Prof Woodward said.One of the fundamental premises of E2EE is that only the sender and intended recipients of a message can know or infer the contents of that message. It is one of the reasons that people like using WhatsApp and Signal.Susie Hargreaves, chief executive of the charity the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF), wants provisions in the OSB to enable Ofcom to co-designate with the IWF to regulate child sexual abuse material online.She said: "Our unparalleled expertise in this area would make the response strong and effective from day one. "We have the strong collaborative relationships with industry, law enforcement, as well as the world-leading expertise which can make sure no child is left behind or their suffering left undetected."ProportionalityThe overnment says it will not be enough for a big tech company to say it simply cannot deploy certain technologies on its platform, because of they way it is configured.If it is proportionate and necessary, Ofcom can now issue a notice to a company to take steps to demonstrate they are using their best endeavours to develop or source tools which will remove child sexual abuse imagery. But this all depends on the regulator's assessment of the risk of child exploitation.Prof Woodward said: "Ofcom have a steep hill to climb. They will need to attract a lot of rare talent...to come up with the technical solutions demanded by the OSB. "That's not to mention the skills they will need to navigate the secondary legislation...It's a truly huge task ahead of them."Ofcom told the BBC it was preparing to take on the new role, bringing in skills and expertise from across the tech sector, as well as experts from child protection and advocacy bodies.Its spokesperson said: "Tackling child sexual abuse online is central to the new online safety laws - and rightly so. It's a big and challenging job, but we'll be ready to put these ground-breaking laws into practice once the OSB is passed."Image source, Getty ImagesThe National Crime Agency estimates there are between 550,000 and 850,000 people in the UK who pose a sexual risk to children. Access to such content online can lead to offenders normalising their own consumption of this content, sharing methods with each other on how to evade detection, and escalation to committing actual child sexual abuse offences.Digital minister Nadine Dorries said: "Tech firms have a responsibility not to provide safe spaces for horrendous images of child abuse to be shared online. Nor should they blind themselves to these awful crimes happening on their sites."Maeve Hanna, partner at law firm Allen & Overy told the BBC: "While the objectives of the amendment are laudable, it's not clear what a tech company will have to do in practice to comply with notices issued by Ofcom or to avoid the large fines threatened. "This lack of clarity will also present real challenges to any Ofcom enforcement action. For example, how will Ofcom show that tech companies could have - but failed to - develop any particular new technology where that technology doesn't exist yet?"Follow Shiona McCallum on Twitter @shionamcMore on this storyInfluencers and followers 'need more protection'9 MayOnline Safety Bill tweaked to target scam ads9 MarchOnline Safety Bill : What to expect6 December 2021

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BBC News

Tech firms told to do better on child abuse images

Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesThe government is giving Ofcom extra tools to ensure tech companies act to prevent, identify and remove child sexual abuse and exploitation content.The powers will be introduced through an amendment to the Online Safety Bill, which aims to police the internet.If the tech firms do not comply, Ofcom will be able to impose fines of up to £18m or 10% of the company's global annual turnover, whichever is higher.However there is growing concern over how it will work in practice.There are questions over what exactly the extra tools are that media regulator Ofcom will get.And one of the main concerns surrounds the popular end-to-end encryption (E2EE) or ultra-secure messaging - such as WhatsApp and Signal - and how that might be infiltrated.The government says it is supporting the development of tools which could detect child sexual abuse imagery content within or around an E2EE environment, while respecting user privacy. It says this will further inform the wider debate around user privacy and user safety.But Prof Alan Woodward from the University of Surrey told the BBC that to detect child abuse imagery or associated text, the current techniques will only work on unencrypted data. "If the OSB insists on discovering such material in encrypted data, it can be achieved only by examining the sending and receiving devices, i.e. where it is decrypted for consumption."The implication is some form of universal 'client-side scanning' which many will see as overly intrusive and liable to... be used to detect other items unrelated to child safety."Client-side scanning refers to technology that scan message contents for matches against a database of content (for example child sexual abuse images) before the message is sent to the intended recipient.If Ofcom gets the powers to impose scanning technologies, there are calls from experts for the government to flesh out the detail on the technical feasibility, security implications and impact on privacy. Experts say there is no way to make scanning technologies work for "good' purposes" only."The big issue will be that any technology that can be used to look at what is otherwise encrypted could be misused by bad actors to conduct surveillance," Prof Woodward said.One of the fundamental premises of E2EE is that only the sender and intended recipients of a message can know or infer the contents of that message. It is one of the reasons that people like using WhatsApp and Signal.Susie Hargreaves, chief executive of the charity the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF), wants provisions in the OSB to enable Ofcom to co-designate with the IWF to regulate child sexual abuse material online.She said: "Our unparalleled expertise in this area would make the response strong and effective from day one. "We have the strong collaborative relationships with industry, law enforcement, as well as the world-leading expertise which can make sure no child is left behind or their suffering left undetected."ProportionalityThe overnment says it will not be enough for a big tech company to say it simply cannot deploy certain technologies on its platform, because of they way it is configured.If it is proportionate and necessary, Ofcom can now issue a notice to a company to take steps to demonstrate they are using their best endeavours to develop or source tools which will remove child sexual abuse imagery. But this all depends on the regulator's assessment of the risk of child exploitation.Prof Woodward said: "Ofcom have a steep hill to climb. They will need to attract a lot of rare talent...to come up with the technical solutions demanded by the OSB. "That's not to mention the skills they will need to navigate the secondary legislation...It's a truly huge task ahead of them."Ofcom told the BBC it was preparing to take on the new role, bringing in skills and expertise from across the tech sector, as well as experts from child protection and advocacy bodies.Its spokesperson said: "Tackling child sexual abuse online is central to the new online safety laws - and rightly so. It's a big and challenging job, but we'll be ready to put these ground-breaking laws into practice once the OSB is passed."Image source, Getty ImagesThe National Crime Agency estimates there are between 550,000 and 850,000 people in the UK who pose a sexual risk to children. Access to such content online can lead to offenders normalising their own consumption of this content, sharing methods with each other on how to evade detection, and escalation to committing actual child sexual abuse offences.Digital minister Nadine Dorries said: "Tech firms have a responsibility not to provide safe spaces for horrendous images of child abuse to be shared online. Nor should they blind themselves to these awful crimes happening on their sites."Maeve Hanna, partner at law firm Allen & Overy told the BBC: "While the objectives of the amendment are laudable, it's not clear what a tech company will have to do in practice to comply with notices issued by Ofcom or to avoid the large fines threatened. "This lack of clarity will also present real challenges to any Ofcom enforcement action. For example, how will Ofcom show that tech companies could have - but failed to - develop any particular new technology where that technology doesn't exist yet?"Follow Shiona McCallum on Twitter @shionamcMore on this storyInfluencers and followers 'need more protection'9 MayOnline Safety Bill tweaked to target scam ads9 MarchOnline Safety Bill : What to expect6 December 2021

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Asahi Shimbun Digital

英の重要閣僚2人、抗議の辞任 「ジョンソン首相の対応は不誠実」

 英ジョンソン政権の重要閣僚2人が5日、相次いで辞任を表明した。党幹部の不祥事に絡むジョンソン氏の対応が不誠実だとして抗議する形で、「信頼を失った」などと通告した。ロックダウン中のパーティー出席など失点続きのジョンソン氏の交代を求める声が与党内で広がっており、ジョンソン氏は一気に窮地に立たされている。 辞任したのはスナック財務相とジャビド保健相。いずれもコロナ禍対応を担った政権の中心閣僚だ。 スナック氏は首相宛ての辞表で「国民は政府が正しく、有能で、まじめであることを期待している」としたうえで、「この基準は守る価値があり、だから私は辞任する」と述べた。ジャビド氏も書簡で、与党保守党が、国のための有益な党だと国民に認められていないと指摘し、「この状況はあなたの指導力の下では変わらない」と断じた。 怒りの原因は、ジョンソン氏…

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Japan News – Livedoor News RSS Feed

歌手のYUKIがCMに出演 50歳でも変わらぬビジュアルに驚きの声が続出

 今年2月にソロデビュー20周年を迎えた歌手のYUKI。現在放映されている『サッポロ生ビール黒ラベル』のTVCM「大人エレベーター」シリーズに“50歳大人代表”として出演し、話題になっている。メディアに出演する機会が少ないだけに、その変わらぬビジュアルに衝撃を受ける視聴者が続出。3年ぶりのCM出演となった歌手の大塚愛と共に紹介する。【動画&写真】可愛すぎて眩しい…“奇跡の50歳”YUKIの現在の姿! 可愛らしいダンスを披露した大塚愛◆感性がいつもフレッシュ…YUKIの見た目だけでなく内面も素敵と話題

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BBC News – UK RSS Feed – World News

Roe v Wade: How Norfolk's Sir Edward Coke was invoked in US abortion ruling

Published3 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesBorn and bred in Norfolk, Sir Edward Coke was cited in the US Supreme Court's recent ruling that overturned Roe v Wade. But who was this English jurist whose views continue to shape the modern world?A curious incident unfolded not so long ago at Burwood Hall in Mileham, Norfolk.Brothers Tom and Mark Butler-Stoney encountered a soaking wet lawyer from Arkansas walking around their farm."It turned out he [the lawyer] had been swimming in the moat," said Tom. "He thought that would give him wonderful blessings as a lawyer because surely, as a boy, Sir Edward Coke went and swam around in that moat."If you own a moat, the last thing you expect or want is to find a lawyer from Arkansas swimming around in it."Sir Edward, who would later become Solicitor-General, Attorney General and Lord Chief Justice, was born at Burwood Hall in 1552.Legal experts say he remains one of the world's most important jurists.That a visitor from the United States held Sir Edward in such high regard is not as surprising as it might seem.Sir Edward is more revered in the United States than in the UK, according to Prof Sir John Baker, Downing Professor Emeritus of the Laws of England at Cambridge University.BBCWhen it comes to laws and the legal systems in place around the world, which underpin so much of modern day life, well then that's the long-term impact of Sir Edward."Stephen OlleyAuthor of The Book of Litcham with Lexham and MilehamSir Edward's work on common law was relied upon by the US founding fathers and the early US courts.In his report on a case in 1608, for example, Sir Edward deemed a person's status was based on their place of birth - a finding that led to the American rule of birth right citizenship, which in turn is embodied in the US Constitution's 14th Amendment."He was an immensely important jurist," said Sir John. "He was one of the most important ever common law jurists."His main claim was that he pretty well invented judicial review, which got him into terrible trouble."He was, said Sir John, an "emotional person" whose methods during some trials, including that of Sir Walter Raleigh in 1603, were considered brutal and widely criticised at the time."He behaved badly and nobody can really defend that," said Sir John. "But as a result of that, I think his role has been rather downplayed."Sir John said while modern attorney generals are expected to defend the government's position, Sir Edward saw his role as ensuring "people did not abuse their power"."Sir Edward was a man of tremendous ability and industry who seemed to sleep little," said Sir John. "He was quite extraordinary and worked into his 80s."The jurist only began to slow down, said Sir John, after helping frame the Petition of Right in 1628, which was a defence of the supremacy of the common law over royal prerogative.So what of the reference to Sir Edward in the US Supreme Court's recent controversial ruling?Delivered by Justice Alito, the Opinion of the Supreme Court on Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization refers to "Sir Edward Coke's 17th-century treatise" in which he "asserted that abortion of a quick child was 'murder' if the 'childe be born alive' and a 'great misprision' if the 'childe dieth in her body'."Sir Edward was not putting forward "opposing arguments" on abortion, said Sir John. "He was just setting down what people thought the law was."What was Roe v Wade about?In 1969, a 25-year-old single woman, Norma McCorvey using the pseudonym "Jane Roe", challenged the criminal abortion laws in Texas. The state forbade abortion as unconstitutional, except in cases where the mother's life was in danger.Defending the anti-abortion law was Henry Wade - the district attorney for Dallas County - hence Roe v Wade.Ms McCorvey was pregnant with her third child when she filed the case, and claimed that she had been raped. But the case was rejected and she was forced to give birth.In 1973, her appeal made it to the US Supreme Court, where her case was heard alongside that of a 20-year-old Georgia woman, Sandra Bensing.They argued that abortion laws in Texas and Georgia went against the US Constitution because they infringed a woman's right to privacy.By a vote of seven to two, the court justices ruled that governments lacked the power to prohibit abortions.They judged that a woman's right to terminate her pregnancy was protected by the US constitution.What is Roe v Wade ruling on abortion? Sir Edward, who had been educated at the Free Grammar School in Norwich and Trinity College, Cambridge, died in 1634 at Stoke Poges in Buckinghamshire.But it was to Norfolk that Sir Edward would return in death.In his will, he asked that his "body bee carried to Tittleshall Church and laid in the vault there where my first good wife (Bridget Paston) lyeth."During his life, it seems Sir Edward never forgot Norfolk, in which he owned increasing amounts of land, and the county's people have never forgotten him.Author, photographer and local historian Stephen Olley said: "The Norfolk people know his name - mainly through farming because his family bought Tittleshall and then him buying Godwick, which is the next village along, and then further and further afield."But if you lived around here you probably would not learn much about him, or his wider impact, unless you studied law."I don't think people are taught about this chap who was born down the road who was such an important person," he said. "I think his name needs to be brought back into the limelight more."Mr Olley, who also runs the Mid Norfolk Picture Archive, told how Sir Edward transformed education in Mileham by donating land for the education of children"He was very much concerned about the education of children here."As an educated man, he would have known that the children of his farm workers were not educated so he wanted to provide them with an education."He's buried under the church alongside his first wife in Tittleshall, where there are memorials to a number of members of the Coke family," said Mr Olley.Ask Mr Olley which famous son of Norfolk - Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson or Sir Edward - had the greatest long-term impact and he errs towards the latter."Nelson is known mainly because of the battles and, were it not for him, we might be speaking French," he said. "But when it comes to laws and the legal systems in place around the world, which underpin so much of modern day life, well then that's the long-term impact of Sir Edward."Find BBC News: East of England on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected] on this storyWhat happens now Roe v Wade has been overturned?6 days agoWhat is Roe v Wade ruling on abortion?24 JuneRelated Internet LinksUniversity of CambridgeThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

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Roe v Wade: How Norfolk's Sir Edward Coke was invoked in US abortion ruling

Published2 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesBorn and bred in Norfolk, Sir Edward Coke was cited in the US Supreme Court's recent ruling that overturned Roe v Wade. But who was this English jurist whose views continue to shape the modern world?A curious incident unfolded not so long ago at Burwood Hall in Mileham, Norfolk.Brothers Tom and Mark Butler-Stoney encountered a soaking wet lawyer from Arkansas walking around their farm."It turned out he [the lawyer] had been swimming in the moat," said Tom. "He thought that would give him wonderful blessings as a lawyer because surely, as a boy, Sir Edward Coke went and swam around in that moat."If you own a moat, the last thing you expect or want is to find a lawyer from Arkansas swimming around in it."Sir Edward, who would later become Solicitor-General, Attorney General and Lord Chief Justice, was born at Burwood Hall in 1552.Legal experts say he remains one of the world's most important jurists.That a visitor from the United States held Sir Edward in such high regard is not as surprising as it might seem.Sir Edward is more revered in the United States than in the UK, according to Prof Sir John Baker, Downing Professor Emeritus of the Laws of England at Cambridge University.BBCWhen it comes to laws and the legal systems in place around the world, which underpin so much of modern day life, well then that's the long-term impact of Sir Edward."Stephen OlleyAuthor of The Book of Litcham with Lexham and MilehamSir Edward's work on common law was relied upon by the US founding fathers and the early US courts.In his report on a case in 1608, for example, Sir Edward deemed a person's status was based on their place of birth - a finding that led to the American rule of birth right citizenship, which in turn is embodied in the US Constitution's 14th Amendment."He was an immensely important jurist," said Sir John. "He was one of the most important ever common law jurists."His main claim was that he pretty well invented judicial review, which got him into terrible trouble."He was, said Sir John, an "emotional person" whose methods during some trials, including that of Sir Walter Raleigh in 1603, were considered brutal and widely criticised at the time."He behaved badly and nobody can really defend that," said Sir John. "But as a result of that, I think his role has been rather downplayed."Sir John said while modern attorney generals are expected to defend the government's position, Sir Edward saw his role as ensuring "people did not abuse their power"."Sir Edward was a man of tremendous ability and industry who seemed to sleep little," said Sir John. "He was quite extraordinary and worked into his 80s."The jurist only began to slow down, said Sir John, after helping frame the Petition of Right in 1628, which was a defence of the supremacy of the common law over royal prerogative.So what of the reference to Sir Edward in the US Supreme Court's recent controversial ruling?Delivered by Justice Alito, the Opinion of the Supreme Court on Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health Organization refers to "Sir Edward Coke's 17th-century treatise" in which he "asserted that abortion of a quick child was 'murder' if the 'childe be born alive' and a 'great misprision' if the 'childe dieth in her body'."Sir Edward was not putting forward "opposing arguments" on abortion, said Sir John. "He was just setting down what people thought the law was."What was Roe v Wade about?In 1969, a 25-year-old single woman, Norma McCorvey using the pseudonym "Jane Roe", challenged the criminal abortion laws in Texas. The state forbade abortion as unconstitutional, except in cases where the mother's life was in danger.Defending the anti-abortion law was Henry Wade - the district attorney for Dallas County - hence Roe v Wade.Ms McCorvey was pregnant with her third child when she filed the case, and claimed that she had been raped. But the case was rejected and she was forced to give birth.In 1973, her appeal made it to the US Supreme Court, where her case was heard alongside that of a 20-year-old Georgia woman, Sandra Bensing.They argued that abortion laws in Texas and Georgia went against the US Constitution because they infringed a woman's right to privacy.By a vote of seven to two, the court justices ruled that governments lacked the power to prohibit abortions.They judged that a woman's right to terminate her pregnancy was protected by the US constitution.What is Roe v Wade ruling on abortion? Sir Edward, who had been educated at the Free Grammar School in Norwich and Trinity College, Cambridge, died in 1634 at Stoke Poges in Buckinghamshire.But it was to Norfolk that Sir Edward would return in death.In his will, he asked that his "body bee carried to Tittleshall Church and laid in the vault there where my first good wife (Bridget Paston) lyeth."During his life, it seems Sir Edward never forgot Norfolk, in which he owned increasing amounts of land, and the county's people have never forgotten him.Author, photographer and local historian Stephen Olley said: "The Norfolk people know his name - mainly through farming because his family bought Tittleshall and then him buying Godwick, which is the next village along, and then further and further afield."But if you lived around here you probably would not learn much about him, or his wider impact, unless you studied law."I don't think people are taught about this chap who was born down the road who was such an important person," he said. "I think his name needs to be brought back into the limelight more."Mr Olley, who also runs the Mid Norfolk Picture Archive, told how Sir Edward transformed education in Mileham by donating land for the education of children"He was very much concerned about the education of children here."As an educated man, he would have known that the children of his farm workers were not educated so he wanted to provide them with an education."He's buried under the church alongside his first wife in Tittleshall, where there are memorials to a number of members of the Coke family," said Mr Olley.Ask Mr Olley which famous son of Norfolk - Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson or Sir Edward - had the greatest long-term impact and he errs towards the latter."Nelson is known mainly because of the battles and, were it not for him, we might be speaking French," he said. "But when it comes to laws and the legal systems in place around the world, which underpin so much of modern day life, well then that's the long-term impact of Sir Edward."Find BBC News: East of England on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. If you have a story suggestion email [email protected] on this storyWhat happens now Roe v Wade has been overturned?6 days agoWhat is Roe v Wade ruling on abortion?24 JuneRelated Internet LinksUniversity of CambridgeThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

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Dea-John Reid killing: I got no justice at trial, says mother

Published3 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, FamilyThe mother of a black teenager fatally stabbed by a white boy says if the roles were reversed her son "would have gone down for murder".Dea-John Reid, 14, died in Birmingham last year. A 15-year-old was convicted of manslaughter but not his murder.Joan Morris and her supporters want guidance changed to ensure black jurors at trials where victims are black. The Ministry of Justice said juries were selected at random to ensure a cross-section of society was reflected.Two other teenagers and two adults, George Khan, 39, and Michael Shields, 36, were acquitted of murder during the trial in March.The jury at Birmingham Crown Court was made up of 11 white people and one of south Asian heritage. In England and Wales Crown courts, jury members are selected at random and challenges can be made, but the current Crown Prosecution guidelines do not allow for challenges based on ethnic mix.Image source, FamilyAt the trial, jurors were told Dea-John was "hunted down" by a group of white youths and adults who shouted racial slurs.Some were masked and they were armed with a wrench and large kitchen knife. The teen was stabbed in front of multiple witnesses. His killer was given a six-and-a-half year sentence in May this year.Dea-John had been out with friends on the day he died and the trial heard the violence was sparked by an earlier confrontation in which one of his group was accused of trying to steal a bag.'Breaks my heart'Speaking exclusively to the BBC, Ms Morris said if the roles had been reversed and Dea-John had attacked one of the white boys, the outcome would have been different.She said: "I didn't get a fair trial. This is murder. This is not manslaughter."If it was Dea-John who did this to that child, Dea-John would get sentenced and charged for murder because he is black. He would have gone down for murder."I sat in court for how many hours, for six weeks thinking 'I am going to get justice'. And [there is] no justice. This is unfair."To see them walk free and nothing come out of it... it breaks my heart." In CCTV footage played to jurors, Dea-John was seen being chased through streets in the Kingstanding area of the city pursued by three people.This video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Image source, FamilyA lawyer for the 15-year old accepted his client had caused Dea-John's death, but told the jury he had not intended to kill him and had been acting in self-defence.During sentencing, Mr Justice Johnson told him: "If an adult did what you did it would almost certainly be murder and they would be sentenced to life imprisonment."Ms Morris believes Dea-John was twice a victim - once when he was killed and again because of the justice system.She added: "I feel let down. "To know that Dea-John died and he don't get any justice, no justice at all, this make me feels so bad. "I need justice. I'm still waiting for justice. If I get justice it will ease my pain a bit."Deep down inside of me I am dying. They can't look at a case like this and say 'this is manslaughter'." Family 'let down' as teen jailed for killing boyBoy 'hunted down', court hearsHundreds remember stabbed boy, 14, at vigil Bishop Desmond Jaddoo, who is supporting the family, said the case showed a change in the law was needed to allow a greater racial mix on juries when victims are black.He said: "In cases of this nature where race particularly is an issue, then clearly we need to ensure that there are reflective juries. "There needs to be checks and balances."Birmingham is a city where you have got a 50%, at least, city of colour, that was not reflected in the jury."It beggars belief how [the jury] came to that conclusion."A national march for racial justice has been organised as part of the family's campaign and is due to take place in Kingstanding on Saturday from 13:00 BST.In a statement, the Ministry of Justice said: "This was a despicable crime and our thoughts remain with the family and friends of Dea-John Reid."Successive academic studies have shown [juries] deliver fair and impartial results, regardless of their ethnic make-up or the ethnicity of the defendant."Follow BBC West Midlands on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Send your story ideas to: [email protected]e on this storyFamily 'let down' as teen jailed for killing boy6 MayTeen guilty of killing boy who was 'hunted down'30 MarchBoy 'hunted down' and murdered, court hears23 FebruaryFive deny stabbing murder of boy, 145 August 2021Hundreds remember stabbed boy, 14, at vigil7 June 2021Related Internet LinksCrown Prosecution ServiceThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

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