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2023 Doraemon Film's Teaser Reveals Story, Title, March 2023 Opening

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Nobita to Sora no Utopia centers on skybound adventure for utopian land


The staff for the Doraemon anime series revealed the story, title, staff, visual, and teaser trailer for the 2023 Doraemon film on Monday. The 42nd film in the franchise is titled Eiga Doraemon: Nobita to Sora no Utopia (titled Doraemon the Movie 2023: Nobita’s Sky Utopia in English), and it will open in March 2023.




The film will be set in a perfect, utopian world in the sky, where everyone lives happily. Adventurers have equated the land with other mythical cities, such as Atlantis or Ryūgū-jō. Doraemon and Nobita set out on an adventure to find the utopia with the help of a gadget that is brand-new for the film, the time zeppelin equipped with a time warp function.

Takumi Dōyama (Genbanojō, Doraemon episodes) is directing the film. Ryota Kosawa (Always: Sunset on Third Street, Great Pretender) is penning the script — his first for a Doraemon film. The television anime’s current cast members are reprising their roles for the film.

Doraemon: Nobita’s Little “Star Wars” 2021, the franchise‘s 41st anime film, opened in Japan on March 4 after a yearlong delay due to COVID-19. It ranked at #1 in its opening weekend, and sold 350,000 tickets for 440 million yen (about US$3.81 million) in its first three days. The film is a remake of the 1985 Doraemon film of the same title.

Source: Comic Natalie


North American Anime, Manga Releases, July 3-9

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Title
Publisher
Suggested
Retail Price
Date

APOSIMZ GN 9Please

Kodansha Comics
US$7.99
July 5

Bungo Stray Dogs Wan! GN 2Cite

Yen Press
US$6.99
July 5

Changes of Heart GN 3AnimeNewsNetwork

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

A Couple of Cuckoos GN 8Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Daily Report About My Witch Senpai GN 2Please

Seven Seas
US$9.99
July 5

Desert Eagle GN 1Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Dr. Stone GN 22Please

Viz Media
US$6.99
July 5

Drifting Dragons GN 11Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Durarara!! Re;Dollars Arc GN 7Please

Yen Press
US$6.99
July 5

Edens Zero GN 17Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

The Elusive Samurai GN 1Please

Viz Media
US$6.99
July 5

The Eminence in Shadow GN 4Please

Yen Press
US$6.99
July 5

The Girl I Saved on the Train Turned Out to Be My Childhood Friend GN 1Please

Yen Press
US$6.99
July 5

Gleipnir GN 11Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Go For It Again, Nakamura!! GNPlease

Seven Seas
US$9.99
July 5

Hello, Melancholic! GN 2Please

Seven Seas
US$9.99
July 5

Kounodori: Dr. Stork GN 25Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Kubo Won’t Let Me Be Invisible GN 2Please

Viz Media
US$6.99
July 5

Magic Artisan Dahlia Wilts No More GN 2Please

Seven Seas
US$9.99
July 5

The Most Notorious “Talker” Runs the World’s Greatest Clan GN 2Please

Seven Seas
US$9.99
July 5

My Hero Academia GN 31Please

Viz Media
US$6.99
July 5

My Love Mix-Up! GN 4Please

Viz Media
US$6.99
July 5

My Master Has No Tail GN 7Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

My Wonderful World GN 1Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Non Non Biyori GN 16Please

Seven Seas
US$9.99
July 5

Noragami: Stray God GN 24Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Oh, Those Hanazono Twins GN 3Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Perfect World GN 12Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Re:ZERO -Starting Life in Another World- GN 4Please

Yen Press
US$6.99
July 5

Saint Young Men GN 19Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

A Sign of Affection GN 6Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Slasher Maidens GN 5Please

Yen Press
US$6.99
July 5

Studio Apartment, Good Lighting, Angel Included GN 1Please

Yen Press
US$6.99
July 5

Superwomen in Love! Honey Trap and Rapid Rabbit GN 4Please

Seven Seas
US$9.99
July 5

Sword Art Online: Project Alicization GN 5Please

Yen Press
US$6.99
July 5

To Your Eternity GN 17Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Vampire Knight: Memories GN 7Please

Viz Media
US$6.99
July 5

When Will Ayumu Make His Move? GN 6Please

Kodansha Comics
US$10.99
July 5

Ultraman Gets Crossover Comic Book Mini Series With Marvel

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Spider-Man, Iron Man, Captain Marvel fight kaiju in the Ultraman universe


Tsuburaya Productions and Marvel Comics announced at the Ultraman panel at Anime Expo on Saturday that they are producing a crossover comic book mini series debuting in 2023. Spider-Man, Iron Man, and Captain Marvel will enter the Ultraman universe, where they team up with the eponymous Ultraman and Ultraseven to battle kaiju and supervillains.

Kyle Higgins (Batman: Gates of Gotham, Power Rangers) and Mat Groom (Self/Made, The Rise of Ultraman) will write the series.

The series will be part of Tsuburaya Productions and Marvel ComicsUltraman comic book continuity, which launched in 2020. Previous installments include The Rise of Ultraman, The Trials of Ultraman, and the upcoming The Mystery of Ultraseven.

Tsuburaya ProductionsUltraman franchise launched in 1966, and celebrated its 55th anniversary in 2021. Studio Khara‘s new Shin Ultraman film opened in Japan on May 13. Shin Godzilla director Shinji Higuchi and his Higuchi-Gumi team helmed the project, and Evangelion creator Hideaki Anno was in charge of planning and scripts.

Source: Tsuburaya Productions official global website


Bandai Namco Entertainment, ILCA Establish New Company Bandai Namco Aces

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Company to produce content for Ace Combat video game series


Bandai Namco Entertainment announced on Friday that it and ILCA Inc. have established a new company Bandai Namco Aces. The company, headquartered in Shinjuku, Tokyo, aims to deliver “deep and lasting, high-quality content to fans around the world, including for the Ace Combat series.”

Takuya Iwasaki will be president and CEO of the company, and Kazutoki Kono will be the executive vice president. Jun Ikeda, Shinya Sorimachi, and Masatoshi Furubayashi are on the board of directors. Toshifumi Odaka will be the company’s auditor.

Bandai Namco Entertainment holds 51% of the company’s shares and ILCA holds 49%.

The Ace Combat series are loosely realistic flight shooting games that feature mostly real-world aircraft in a fictional setting officially named “Strangereal.” Evoking the modern world and contemporary political entities, the setting pits superpowers in large-scale political struggles, with players taking on the role of fighter pilots in the world’s frequent conflicts.

Namco released the first Ace Combat game in 1992. Bandai Namco Games released Ace Combat Infinity as the first free-to-play Ace Combat game for the PlayStation 3 in May 2014. The most recent game in the series, Ace Combat 7: Skies Unknown, shipped in January 2019 for PlayStation 4 (with PlayStation VR support) and Xbox One, and in February 2019 for PC.

Kazutoki Kono announced during a 25th anniversary live stream program for the game franchise that the next Ace Combat entry is in development

Sources: Press release via Gematsu


Disclosure: Bandai Namco Filmworks Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Bandai Namco Holdings Inc., is a non-controlling, minority shareholder in Anime News Network Inc.


Danganronpa S: Ultimate Summer Camp Heads to PS4, Mobile, PC on July 21

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Enhanced version of Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony board game features over 1,000 event scenes

Spike Chunsoft announced on Wednesday that its Danganronpa S: Ultimate Summer Camp game will launch for PlayStation 4, PC via Steam, iOS, and Android in North America and Europe on July 21.

The game is a “massively enhanced version” of the Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony board game Ultimate Talent Development Plan. The game has over 1,000 event scenes and new costumes for the characters.

The game launched for Switch in December 2021.

The Danganronpa Decadence game collection, which also includes the Danganronpa S: Ultimate Summer Camp bonus board game, shipped as a physical exclusive on Nintendo Switch in North America and Europe in December 2021. The collection launched in Japan under the title Danganronpa Trilogy Pack + Happy Danganronpa S: Chōkōkōkyū no Nangoku Saikoro Kasshuku in November 2021.

NIS America released Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony for PS4, PS Vita, and PC in September 2017. Spike Chunsoft released the game in Japan for PS4 and PS Vita in January 2017. NIS America then released a Danganronpa Trilogy collection for PlayStation 4 in March 2019.

Spike Chunsoft released Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc Anniversary Edition, the first game in the trilogy, for smartphones in May 2020. It then released Danganronpa 2: Goodbye Despair Anniversary Edition for smartphones in August 2020, and released Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony Anniversary Edition for smartphones on April 12.

The franchise also includes a manga series, three television anime series, an anime special, and an original video anime (OVA) project.

Source: Press release


Toei Considers Legal Action Against Illegally Recorded Uploads of Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero Footage

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Toei revealed on Monday that it has identified about 3,000 cases of illegally recorded footage uploads of Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero — the second anime film in the Dragon Ball Super franchise — on various platforms such as YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, 10 days after the film’s opening. According to Toei, the number of cases is about 10 times that of the previous film, Dragon Ball Super: Broly.

The company added that it is looking into legal action against these uploads, and is eyeing the matter as both a criminal and civil case. Toei has also filed a request with the respective platforms to remove the illegally uploaded footage.

People who violate Japan’s Copyright Act and its Act on Prevention of Unauthorized Recording of Films and the general Copyright Law face up to 10 years in prison, up to 10 million yen (about US$73,000) in fines, or both.

Suspects were arrested or charged under the law for recording in theaters from Space Battleship Yamato Resurrection in 2010, Mobile Suit Gundam 00 the Movie: A Wakening of the Trailblazer in 2011, Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha the Movie 2nd A’s in 2012, The Wind Rises in 2014, Demon Slayer – Kimetsu no Yaiba – The Movie: Mugen Train in March 2021, and more recently, Detective Conan: The Scarlet Bullet in June 2021.

Another anime studio, Khara, posted a notice in June 2021 about the unauthorized recording and uploading of footage from Evangelion: 3.0+1.0: Thrice Upon A Time (Shin Evangelion Gekijō-ban :||), the “final” Evangelion film, which opened in Japan in March 2021. The studio added that charges have already being filed in a similar case that occurred in July 2018.

Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero opened in Japan on June 11. The film sold about 498,000 tickets for about 670 million yen (about US$4.99 million) in its first two days. The film has so far sold a total of 1.4 million tickets for 1,903,144,340 yen (about US$13.99 million), as of July 3.

The film opened after a delay due to the Toei Animation hack in March. The film was originally slated to open in Japan on April 22. The film began screening in IMAX starting on June 11, in 4DX and MX4D starting on June 25, and in Dolby Cinemas starting on July 1.

Crunchyroll and Sony Pictures will screen the film in theaters worldwide this summer starting in August. The summer screenings will include both the original Japanese audio with subtitles and with a dub. The companies will distribute the film in “all continents, including North America, Latin America, Europe, Australia/New Zealand, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia (excluding Japan).”

Sources: Cinema Today (倉本拓弥) via Otakomu, Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero’s website

Capcom Fighting Collection

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The arcades of the 1990s never wanted for fighting games. Capcom’s Street Fighter II saw to that, striking gold with its 1991 debut and inspiring wave upon wave of imitators. Yet that proved a burden whenever Capcom created an arcade game that wasn’t Street Fighter. Their new attempts weren’t just competing with the Mortal Kombats and Killer Instincts from rival companies; they also went up against the latest iteration of Street Fighter that Capcom always had in the pipeline. It was often hard for less-hyped Capcom entries to stand out.

Capcom Fighting Collection sheds some light on these occasionally neglected classics. There’s a pure Street Fighter title in there, yes, but the real attractions come from other corners: all five main Darkstalkers games, the mecha-based brawler Cyberbots, the parody-filled Super Gem Fighter Mini Mix (aka Pocket Fighter), the block-matching Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo, and the truly obscure Red Earth. They’re all presented in their original arcade versions, recreated precisely on modern hardware and dressed up with a wealth of extra material.

The Darkstalkers series headlines this anthology and with good reason: it’s the most successful Capcom fighting line that doesn’t have Street Fighter or Marvel aboard. The original Darkstalkers (aka Vampire) debuted in 1994, introducing Capcom’s take on classic monsters and myths as well as their new style of animation. Combining a sleek anime look with cartoony exaggeration, Darkstalkers was stunning to watch—heck, it still is. The character lineup hits every major cinematic beastie, from vampires and werewolves and mummies to a yeti named Sasquatch and a catwoman named Felicia (remember the Cat People movies? No?), and they’re all animated in gorgeous style.

Darkstalkers’ gameplay mechanics also took typical fighting-game attacks in outlandish new directions. Even standard punches and kicks make the characters twist and distort and shapeshift, while the more powerful attacks can transform your opponent, slice them comically in half, or bounce them around the screen. That flair builds on Street Fighter’s six-button layout and combos, resulting in a game that’s complex even if you’re just checking out the over-the-top moves and the catchy soundtrack. The Capcom Fighting Collection also goes beyond the call and makes Pyron and Huitzil, the game’s two bosses, into playable characters—something missing from the original release.

That said, the first Darkstalkers may be the most disposable of the bunch. While it established the strengths of the series, the gameplay is a little rough and unbalanced if you dig into it. That was amended by 1995’s Night Warriors (aka Vampire Hunter). Everything was more even, and players could now use full versions of the bosses as well as two new characters: the hopping vampire-ghost Hsien-Ko and the half-monster warrior Donovan. Each character has fresh moves, and even if Night Warriors felt like an expansion of the first game back in 1995, here and now it’s the best version of Darkstalkers in its original form.

That’s because Darkstalkers 3 (aka Vampire Savior) brought daring ideas when it arrived in 1997. For starters, the cast gets four more characters, including a new villain in the demonic Jedah and the series’ first fully human fighter in the heavily armed and violent B.B. Hood. The flow of battle changes dramatically as well: instead of separate rounds, each fight is one continuous session where characters have two (or more) life meters, possibly inspired by Killer Instinct, and a power that grants each Darkstalker different temporary abilities. The animation and backgrounds are at the absolute peak of Capcom’s pixel artistry, with countless little touches you might barely notice in the thick of sparring. It’s enough to make both Darkstalkers 3 and Night Warriors essential.

Darkstalkers 3 bit off more than it could chew when it came to the character mix. The programmers couldn’t fit the previous games’ cast and the newcomers into the memory limit, so the initial release cut out Donovan, Huitzil, and Pyron. To make amends, Capcom released Vampire Hunter 2 not so long afterward, putting back the three missing characters at the expense of Jedah and the other fresh faces. And then there came Vampire Savior 2, which has the four new Darkstalkers 3 characters and the three once-absent Night Warriors characters…but ditches the werewolf Jon Talbain, the fishman Rikuo, and poor under-appreciated Sasquatch.

If that’s confusing, don’t worry: all three versions are here in the collection. Vampire Hunter 2 and Vampire Savior 2 never had localized versions, however, so they’re only in Japanese.

Red Earth might be the most notable piece of the collection, as it’s never before been released for a home system. Known in Japan as Warzard, it presents an alternate fantasy world untouched by industrial revolutions or further technology. It also puts forth an interesting idea: most fighting games have some giant creature as a final or near-final boss, so what if every battle was made like that?

Players can choose from the lion-headed swordsman Leo (essentially the hero of Guin Saga), the ninja Kenji, the martial artist Mai-Ling, and the witch Tessa, but their foes are screen-filling squid horrors, Egyptian chimeras, lumbering Japanese demons, multi-armed idols, ram-horned tyrannosaurs, knights in whirling machine armor, and other impressively animated creatures. While Darkstalkers ran on Capcom’s CPS-2 arcade hardware, Red Earth used the more advanced CPS-3 that would also power Street Fighter III. It’s a gorgeous showcase for the animators, with a variety of imposing beasts and painstakingly rendered backgrounds to dissect in detail.

Red Earth also twists its approach to fighting games. Arcade titles like Konami’s Monster Maulers and Pandora Box’s Metamoqester tried out the boss-rush concept, but Red Earth enhances it with the trappings of an RPG. Characters gain levels, upgrade weapons, and learn new moves as they progress through the game, and a password feature, possibly inspired by BloodStorm, lets players save their character status (the Capcom Fighting Collection’s save feature lessens the need for it, and there’s an option to immediately crank your level to the maximum). Red Earth even introduced death moves of a sort, as it’s possible to cleave monstrous foes in half. One of the game’s multiple endings depends on that.

It’s not hard to see why Red Earth failed in arcades. It focuses on single-player campaigns, the passwords are a little too complicated, and it takes a while to build up a fighter’s arsenal of special moves. The two-player mode limits the roster to the four heroes instead of offering the game’s enormous creatures as selectable (two of them did appear in the widely disliked Capcom Fighting Evolution, if you’re curious). Red Earth went against the grain of the fighting-game climate of the mid-1990s, but it’s much easier to appreciate its innovations, visual artistry, and memorable soundtrack in a collection like this—and to depress yourself by imagining how good a Darkstalkers game would have looked on the CPS-3 hardware.

Cyberbots is another inspired take on fighting games: a Gundam-like tale of orbital colonies and heavily armed mecha. The robots mostly come from Capcom’s earlier brawler Armored Warriors (aka Powered Gear), but the characters and backdrops are all new. The game’s six pilots, ranging from vengeful brawlers to escaped lab experiments, each follow a unique storyline, with cutscenes more elaborate than most fighters of the 1990s cared to employ. The machines and backgrounds are superb in their detail as stages show both subtle and major changes between rounds, and the mechs emit steam, eject spent shells, and change their forms almost as freely as the Darkstalkers cast.

In gameplay terms Cyberbots stays simpler than its Capcom relatives. There are two attack buttons, a boost, and a dedicated weapon button. Combo attacks aren’t hard to pull off, and neither are cheap hits that probably wouldn’t fly in a more precise six-button fighter. Yet the designers use that loose quality to pull off creative attacks beyond convention, such as the robots losing limbs or having weapons overheat. The varied story arcs and carefully designed machines make for both a fine tribute to mecha anime and an enjoyable fighter in general. Cyberbots did not earn a sequel, but it’s heartening that the bratty space princess Devilotte and brash warrior Jin Saotome (and his Apocalypse Zero attire) showed up in several other Capcom games.

The collection goes into more familiar territory with Super Gem Fighter Mini Mix (aka Pocket Fighter), a clash of cutely big-headed characters from Darkstalkers, Red Earth, and Street Fighter. It uses a button layout simpler than any of its inspirations, with a focus on pulling off humorous combos. Characters change outfits and reference other Capcom creations: Felicia dons a procession of Darkstalkers costumes or a Mega Man getup, Street Fighter III’s Ibuki attacks with discordant shamisen music, while Dan bludgeons foes with his long-nosed father, who is himself a parody of SNK’s Mr. Karate from the Art of Fighting series, which in turn was…

In other words, Super Gem Fighter Mini Mix is a treat for deeply devoted Capcom fans and lightly invested fighting-game players, as the moves rarely require a great deal of precision. That may detract from the game’s head-to-head intensity, but it makes Super Gem Fighter no less enjoyable.

The Capcom Fighting Collection’s most recognizable piece is probably Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo. It developed a cult following through its PlayStation and Saturn ports back in the 1990s, and it’s since been revamped and reissued for later systems. The arcade original remains just as playable now, with a cast of pint-size Darkstalkers and Street Fighters (and a Cyberbots cameo) gloating and grimacing as the player tries to assemble falling blocks into gems and shatter them. It’s a cunning challenge in the solo mode and endlessly exuberant with two players.

The Capcom Fighting Collection couldn’t avoid at least one full-blown Street Fighter game, and it’s a good choice. Hyper Street Fighter II: The Anniversary Edition is a 2003 roundup of every official Street Fighter II variant, letting players choose any version of any character from the original 1991 fighter up through 1994’s Super Street Fighter II Turbo. It’s an effective look at the evolution of the game that started the entire fighting game craze.

For those who love hand-drawn animation in video games, playing Capcom Fighting Collection is mandatory just for the look of it. The modern era has a plethora of talented artists making sprite-based 2-D games detailed beyond anything seen in the 1990s, but Capcom’s animators from that decade had an intricate style that’s never been duplicated. It’s on full glorious display here, whether it’s the sight of two uniquely detailed mecha dueling inside an orbital weapon plunging through the atmosphere…or just that glimpse of a Frankenstein monster’s brain popping comically out of his skull as he crashes to the floor.

These games are more than just pretty. Whether it’s the relatively simple combos of Cyberbots and Super Gem Fighter Mini Mix or the deeper layers of Darkstalkers 3 and Night Warriors, there’s plenty to explore in the collection. Of course, fighting games hinge heavily on competitive play, and that demands a robust head-to-head mode. Capcom Fighting Collection has a sturdy online experience with convenient matchmaking, lobbies, and other standard features. Connections seemed solid apart from some international slowdown, and you can search for possible matchups in every game at once.

It’s fair to point out that these aren’t all-encompassing versions of the games. They’re the arcade titles, so they’re missing extras from the home versions. The PlayStation and Saturn releases of Darkstalkers 3 offered all the characters in one convenient package (with actual new endings for Huitzil, Pyron, and Donovan), and the PlayStation 2 anthology added Dee, an alternate version of Donovan. The console ports of Super Gem Fighter Mini Mix had a marathon battle mode and other bonuses. The Japan-only PlayStation and Saturn editions of Cyberbots had full voice acting, three new storylines, and a mech version of Street Fighter’s Akuma. It would have been laborious for Capcom to bundle every iteration of every game, but those who previously played them mostly on consoles will note a few absences.

The Capcom Fighting Collection fixes several bugs and lets you assign special moves to a single button, saving you the trouble of executing the more complicated motions. If it’s not going to help players learn the finer points of the play mechanics, it’s quite handy when you only want to see pint-sized Chun-Li pelt her opponent with a stream of cyclists, Sasquatch ensnare opponents and ride them around like a sled, or any other elaborate super move. Each game can be customized extensively, even enabling or disabling an authentic arcade bootup screen. There are also multiple filters for mimicking a CRT monitor’s look, but they’re identified only by “Type A” names instead of any description or preview of the effect.

The most interesting extra is a voluminous helping of art, from full-color promotional material to production sketches and design documents. A few of the development illustrations are even animated like flip-books, presenting more opportunities to appreciate all the work that went into them. The collection’s music library is just as comprehensive, offering even the individual victory jingles for each Darkstalkers character.

The Capcom Fighting Collection’s greatest issue might come from outside its borders. Less than a month after this anthology arrives, Capcom is set to launch their second Arcade Stadium bundle. Capcom Arcade 2nd Stadium will have over 30 of the publisher’s arcade games, and that includes Super Gem Fighter Mini Mix, Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo, Hyper Street Fighter II, and the first three Darkstalkers games. This cuts deep into Capcom Fighting Collection, with its bonus features and online play being its only clear advantages over the Arcade Stadium package. Just as in the 1990s, Capcom is their own worst enemy.

There’s little fault with the Capcom Fighting Collection games in themselves: they’re excellent. And if they’re missing a few extras here and there, that’s no reason to neglect a lineup that includes the fascinating experiments of Red Earth, the ornate anime tributes of Cyberbots, and two of history’s best 2-D fighting games—those would be Night Warriors and Darkstalkers 3. The 1990s and Capcom themselves weren’t always kind to these titles, but time hasn’t dulled their enticing gameplay, their marvelous animation, or the splendid mix of the two.

Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 Game's Trailer Reveals DLC Pack's July 7 Release, Vegeta (GT)

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DLC also includes Dyspo, Goku (Ultra Instinct -Sign-)


Bandai Namco Entertainment began streaming a trailer for its Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 game on Tuesday, and it reveals that it will add Vegeta (GT) from Dragon Ball GT as a playable character in the new Conton City Vote Pack DLC on Thursday. The pack will also include previously announced characters Dyspo and Goku (Ultra Instinct -Sign-) from Dragon Ball Super. The video also reveals and previews additional content from the DLC pack, as well as free updates:




The previous “Legendary Pack 2” DLC includes Jiren (Full Power), Gogeta (from Dragon Ball Super: Broly), Kale (Super Saiyan 2), and Caulifla (Super Saiyan 2).

The “Legendary Pack 1” features the DLC characters Pikkon and Toppo. The game’s 12th free update also launched with the DLC.

Bandai Namco Entertainment released Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC in North America and Europe in October 2016, and for PS4 in Japan in November 2016. The company then released the game for Nintendo Switch in Japan and the West in September 2017. The game launched for Google‘s Stadia gaming platform in December 2019.

The game’s third DLC “Extra Pack” launched in August 2018, and the fourth DLC “Extra Pack” featuring the characters “Super Saiyan Full Power Broly” and SSGSS Gogeta launched in December 2018. The game added the DLC characters Ribrianne and Super Saiyan God Vegeta as part of “Ultra Pack 1” in June 2019.

The first Dragon Ball Xenoverse game shipped for PS4, PS3, Xbox One, and Xbox 360 in Japan, Europe, and North America in February 2015. The game also debuted on PC via Steam in the same month. The game series has shipped more than 10 million copies worldwide.

Source: Bandai Namco Entertainment Europe’s YouTube channel via Gematsu


Disclosure: Bandai Namco Filmworks Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Bandai Namco Holdings Inc., is a non-controlling, minority shareholder in Anime News Network Inc.


2nd Free! The Final Stroke Film Earns Over 910 Million Yen

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The second film in the new two-part anime film project for the Free! anime franchise titled Free! The Final Stroke has earned over 910 million yen (about US$6.69 million) and sold about 625,000 tickets after 11 weeks in theaters. A special event at Shinjuku Piccadilly revealed on Friday that the franchise is getting a 10th anniversary event in 2023. The franchise‘s official website posted a video announcement for the event:




The film opened at #4 on April 22.

The first film opened in Japan in September. The films are the “final chapter” for the franchise. The project’s tagline is, “Let’s go, to the stage of glory.” The first film opened at #3 at the Japanese box office, and earned 543,136,940 yen (about US$4.75 million) as of October.

The Free! franchise about the Iwatobi High School Swim Club includes three television anime seasons that aired in 2013, 2014, and 2018. The High Speed! -Free! Starting Days- prequel film opened in 2015. The Free! The Movie -Timeless Medley- the Bond and Free! The Movie -Timeless Medley- the Promise compilation films opened in April 2017 and July 2017, respectively. The Free! -Take Your Marks- omnibus film of short stories then opened in October 2017.

The franchise‘s previous entry was Free! ~Road to the World~ Yume (Dream), which opened on July 5, 2019, and was a “reconstruction” of the Free! Dive to the Future television anime series, as well as a “bridge” to the new films.

Source: Mainichi Shimbun’s Mantan Web


Niantic Cancels Transformers: Heavy Metal Real-World AR Mobile Game

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Bloomberg reports that company is canceling 4 projects, will cut about 85 to 90 jobs


Bloomberg reported on Wednesday that Niantic (Pokémon GO) is canceling its Transformers: Heavy Metal real-world AR mobile game based on the Transformers franchise. The news outlet reported that the company is canceling four projects and will cut about 85 to 90 jobs.

Niantic was collaborating with Hasbro and TOMY to launch the game. Seattle-based Very Very Spaceship was developing the game for iOS and Android devices.

According to Bloomberg, Niantic CEO John Hanke stated that the company is “facing a time of economic turmoil” adding that it needs to “further streamline [its] operations in order to best position the company to weather any economic storms that may lie ahead.”

Niantic and the The Pokémon Company International launched the Pokémon GO app in select countries including the United States in July 2016.

The Transformers: Beyond Reality virtual reality game was set for release on March 31 and then was delayed before its cancellation.

Transformers: Rise of the Beasts, the next film in the live-action Transformers franchise, will open on June 9, 2023.

Source: Bloomberg (Jason Schreier) via Transformer World 2005


Summer Time Rendering Anime's 2nd Half Unveils New Video, Cast Member

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The official website for the anime of Yasuki Tanaka’s Summer Time Rendering suspense manga revealed on Tuesday a promotional video, visual, and cast member for the show’s second cours (quarter of a year). The video previews the show’s second opening theme song “Natsuyume Noisy” (A Noisy Summer Dream) by Asaka. The second half of the anime will premiere on Thursday, July 7.

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Yuko Sanpei will play Ryūnosuke, [Warning: The description below contain a spoiler for the television anime. Highlight text to read the spoiler.] [Hizuru Minakata’s twin brother].

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The series will get a game by MAGES. The website will reveal details including release platform at a later date.

Riria. will perform the show’s second ending theme “Shitsuren Song Takusan Kiite Naite Bakari no Watashi wa Mō” (I’ve Listened to Many Songs About Broken Hearts, It’s Too Late For Me Who Only Cries).

The anime premiered on April 14 on the Tokyo MX and BS11 channels. The Walt Disney Company will exclusively stream the new anime globally, including on the Disney+ service in Japan. TVer will also stream it in Japan after broadcast. The show will have 25 episodes and will cover the entire manga.

Publisher Shueisha describes the story:

Upon hearing of Ushio’s death, Shinpei returns to his hometown of Wakayama City on Hitogashima and reunites with his childhood friend’s family. The funeral goes smoothly, but under the surface something strange is brewing on the island. What mysteries await him on this secluded summer island?

Ayumu Watanabe (Space Brothers, Children of the Sea) is directing the anime. Hiroshi Seko (Jujutsu Kaisen, Attack on Titan, Mob Psycho 100) is in charge of the script and series composition. Miki Matsumoto (Major 2nd, Angels of Death is designing the characters. Kusanagi (Higurashi: When They Cry – GOU and SOTSU, 22/7) is in charge of art. NieR series composers Keiichi Okabe, Ryuuichi Takada, and Keigo Hoashi are handling the music at MONACA.

Rock band Macaroni Enpitsu performed the first opening theme song “Hoshi ga Oyogu” (The Stars Swim) for the anime’s first half. The artist cadode performed the ending theme song “Kaika” for the anime’s first half as his major debut.

Tanaka launched the manga on Shonen Jump+ in October 2017, and the manga’s 13th and final volume shipped in April 2021. Shueisha launched its MANGA Plus service with the English version of the manga in January 2019. Udon Entertainment licensed the manga for print.

The manga is also inspiring a live-action adaptation.

Source: Summer Time Rendering anime’s website