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World’s blackest Porsche painted with Japan’s Musou Black 【Video】

RocketNews24 - News Japan

Cars don’t get any blacker than this.

Choosing a color is always an important part of getting a new car. You want something that suits your tastes, but also doesn’t draw too much attention or constantly looks dirty. For those reasons black is often a nice color, but even then there are many shades of black from a dark charcoal grey all the way to…this.

You are kind of looking at what is believed to be the blackest car in the world, a Porsche 911 that was painted at Pit One in Gifu City recently. It is covered in the world’s blackest water-based acrylic paint Musou Black, which was developed by Koyo Orient Japan in Saitama Prefecture and released in September, 2020.

▼ A video showing the creation of the Musou Black Porsche



The paint gave this Porsche a refection rate of about 0.6 percent of visible light, making it slightly darker than the Vantablack BMW X6, which is said to reflect about 1 percent of light overall.

▼ However, it’s so close at this point, a more accurate head-to-head measurement would probably be needed to crown a clear winner



▼ The YouTube channel Dip Your Car also painted a car Musou Black, but had since put sparkly stars on it, taking it out of the running.



Pit One’s Musou Black Porsche was also painted with the help of Koyo Orient, ensuring that they could get the blackest effect possible. And yet, despite its both eye-catching and eye-evading appearance, online comments seemed more concerned about such an automobile’s safety.

“That looks hot.”
“I can’t imagine how many accidents that would get in.”
“I want to see how fast you can cook something on the hood.”
“LOL, that thing’s a death trap.”
“A truck would just roll right over that thing at night and not even notice.”
“It kind of throws my sense of perspective off. I would probably slam right into it.”
“That’s even blacker than I thought it would be.”
“You need to keep the lights on at all times.”

It doesn’t seem that hard to see, but it does look a little disorientating at a glance, so it’s probably better off kept away from public roads so other drivers can stay focused. Actually, for the above video, they made sure to clear the car with the local authorities before taking it out.

Musou Black paint is made in compliance with environmental regulations and nearly odorless. However, in order to maintain its peak black appearance, it’s not possible to wax or apply much of any protective coating to the coarse, powdery paint. This means the paint job is extremely vulnerable to the elements, especially rain.

This means you probably won’t see this Porsche on the streets of Gifu anyway, but it will be on display at Pit One until the end of July. Musou Black is also readily available to buy for whatever your ultra-black needs may be, but at 2,500 yen (US$18) for 100 milliliters (three ounces), a whole car would get pricey. It’s probably best left to gunpla.

Source: PR Times, Musou Black, Pit One, Itai News
Images: PR Times
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“I couldn’t…wipe my own butt” – Hunter x Hunter manga creator discusses medical issues

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The “Yoshihiro Togashi is too lazy to draw new manga” narrative was missing some key facts.

It’s become a running joke among manga/anime fans that Yoshihiro Togashi, creator of Hunter x Hunter and YuYu Hakusho, has a substandard work ethic. That’s not to say anyone has ever called his artwork sloppy, but between Togashi’s outspoken love of video games and idol music, his marriage to Sailor Moon creator Naoko Takeuchi, and set-for-life financial status, it’s not hard to imagine his frequent and extended hiatuses are a result of having already achieved so much success in life that his artistic hunger and burning desire to draw have faded.

So while all the “We can’t get new Hunter x Hunter chapters because Togashi is too lazy to draw them!” wisecracks might be low-hanging fruit, the comedy still has some juiciness of the “it’s funny because it’s (probably) true” sort. However, in a recent message from Togashi himself, the artist explains that crippling, debilitating pain has had a lot to do with his reduced manga output.

Togashi’s message was included in the announcement of Yoshihiro Togashi Exhibition -Puzzle-, an upcoming exhibition of artwork from various stages of his career, and reads:

“I would like to thank everyone for the gift of their warm, loving support while reading my works.

Hmm, that sounded kind of stuffy.

I feel the same way as everyone else. ‘Um, instead of saying ‘thank you,’ go draw new chapters’ is what many of you are probably thinking. For the last two years, I have been unable to sit in a chair. I had to give up on working in the normal way, but have now somehow figured out how to be able to resume drawing.

Everyone, please take care of your lower back. Up until two weeks before writing this message, I couldn’t keep the posture necessary to wipe my own butt, and every time I took a poop, I had to wash it off in the shower. It takes me about three to five times longer than an average person to move around and do things. Your lower back is very important.

So, should you drop something on the ground while attending the exhibition, I strongly recommend to bend at the knees to pick it up, not at the back.

Thank you.”

▼ Promotional artwork for the exhibition

Though he doesn’t mention his specific condition, Togashi’s message makes it pretty clear that he’s been suffering from intense lower back pain, and the broad “take care of your lower back” suggests a chronic lifestyle-based cause for his ailment. Serialized manga artists put an immense amount of time into their work, often spending hour after hour and day after day at their drawing desks, and it sounds like the combined strain eventually became too much for Togashi’s body to bear.

Thankfully, as Togashi himself makes reference to, he’s recently begun drawing again, sharing teasers of his progress through his recently created Twitter account. That progress isn’t exactly fast-paced, but it’s pretty understandable in light of Togashi’s physical condition, and while fans are waiting patiently they’ll also be able to see over 350 pieces of original manga page artwork, full-color illustrations, and other design elements at the Yoshihiro Togashi Exhibition -Puzzle- event, which will run from October 28 to January 9 at the Mori Arts Center gallery in Tokyo’s Roppongi neighborhood.

Source: Oricon News via Otakomu
Top image © SoraNews24
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“I couldn’t…wipe my own butt” – Hunter x Hunter manga creator discusses medical issues

RocketNews24 - News Japan

The “Yoshihiro Togashi is too lazy to draw new manga” narrative was missing some key facts.

It’s become a running joke among manga/anime fans that Yoshihiro Togashi, creator of Hunter x Hunter and YuYu Hakusho, has a substandard work ethic. That’s not to say anyone has ever called his artwork sloppy, but between Togashi’s outspoken love of video games and idol music, his marriage to Sailor Moon creator Naoko Takeuchi, and set-for-life financial status, it’s not hard to imagine his frequent and extended hiatuses are a result of having already achieved so much success in life that his artistic hunger and burning desire to draw have faded.

So while all the “We can’t get new Hunter x Hunter chapters because Togashi is too lazy to draw them!” wisecracks might be low-hanging fruit, the comedy still has some juiciness of the “it’s funny because it’s (probably) true” sort. However, in a recent message from Togashi himself, the artist explains that crippling, debilitating pain has had a lot to do with his reduced manga output.

Togashi’s message was included in the announcement of Yoshihiro Togashi Exhibition -Puzzle-, an upcoming exhibition of artwork from various stages of his career, and reads:

“I would like to thank everyone for the gift of their warm, loving support while reading my works.

Hmm, that sounded kind of stuffy.

I feel the same way as everyone else. ‘Um, instead of saying ‘thank you,’ go draw new chapters’ is what many of you are probably thinking. For the last two years, I have been unable to sit in a chair. I had to give up on working in the normal way, but have now somehow figured out how to be able to resume drawing.

Everyone, please take care of your lower back. Up until two weeks before writing this message, I couldn’t keep the posture necessary to wipe my own butt, and every time I took a poop, I had to wash it off in the shower. It takes me about three to five times longer than an average person to move around and do things. Your lower back is very important.

So, should you drop something on the ground while attending the exhibition, I strongly recommend to bend at the knees to pick it up, not at the back.

Thank you.”

▼ Promotional artwork for the exhibition

Though he doesn’t mention his specific condition, Togashi’s message makes it pretty clear that he’s been suffering from intense lower back pain, and the broad “take care of your lower back” suggests a chronic lifestyle-based cause for his ailment. Serialized manga artists put an immense amount of time into their work, often spending hour after hour and day after day at their drawing desks, and it sounds like the combined strain eventually became too much for Togashi’s body to bear.

Thankfully, as Togashi himself makes reference to, he’s recently begun drawing again, sharing teasers of his progress through his recently created Twitter account. That progress isn’t exactly fast-paced, but it’s pretty understandable in light of Togashi’s physical condition, and while fans are waiting patiently they’ll also be able to see over 350 pieces of original manga page artwork, full-color illustrations, and other design elements at the Yoshihiro Togashi Exhibition -Puzzle- event, which will run from October 28 to January 9 at the Mori Arts Center gallery in Tokyo’s Roppongi neighborhood.

Source: Oricon News via Otakomu
Top image © SoraNews24
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What frozen snack won Seventeen Ice’s “1st Flavor General Election”?

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More importantly, Mr. Sato finds out if it deserved to win.

When Mr. Sato was 17, it was a very good year. It was a very good year for club activities, and sweet ice cream, bought from vending machines. He was on the school’s soft tennis team, when he was 17.

Yes, Japan’s Seventeen Ice brand of ice cream, which is exclusively sold from vending machines in shopping centers and train station platforms, has been around for a long time and is eternally popular with kids and teens in Japan. It’s been around so long that even our grizzled reporter Mr. Sato fondly recalls enjoying them during his younger days.

The world has changed a lot since then, but Seventeen Ice is still as strong as ever, and recently held its “1st Flavor General Election” in which registered fans could vote for their favorites online. Polling took place between 1 May and 30 June and Mr. Sato was able to get the results the very next day.

So, without further ado, here are the Top 5 Seventeen Ice flavors in Japan:

5 – Crispy Strawberry Choco Mille-Feuille
4 – Custard Purin
3 – Muscat
2 – Colorful Choco (Milk)
1 – Raisin Butter Crunch

Our reporter was surprised by the results, mostly because he had never heard of some of these flavors before. It had been a while since he ate a Seventeen Ice and the scene had changed quite a bit. He used to eat Strawberry Shortcake back in the day, but Crispy Strawberry Choco Mille-Feuille was a whole other ballgame. Clearly kids these days are a lot more sophisticated than he used to be.

However, this seemed like the perfect opportunity to rekindle his love affair with vending machine ice cream, so Mr. Sato sought out Japan’s favorite flavor of Seventeen Ice.

The Raisin Butter Crunch cost 180 yen (US$1.33) and was based on the rum raisin butter sandwich cookies commonly found in Hokkaido and elsewhere in Japan. The cookies were pictured on the wrapper, making it all look even more inviting.

Checking the ingredients, Mr. Sato found that this ice cream cone actually contains 0.1 percent alcohol, so it really does use rum-soaked raisins. It seems like a rather adult taste for a Seventeen Ice flavor.

▼ アルコール分0.1% = Contains 0.1 percent alcohol

He unwrapped his election-winning cone to find it was held in a waffle cone. Originally, Seventeen Ice was served as a cylinder of ice cream on a plastic stick. Some flavors still are, but waffle cone varieties have been increasingly added to the line-up.

The top was sprinkled with crumbled pieces of butter cookie and had an enticing aroma.

By the way, this isn’t technically “ice cream,” but “ice milk.” Ice cream is defined as having over 15 percent milk solid in which the amount of milkfat is over eight percent. On the other hand, ice milk has a milk solid content of over 10 percent, of which the milk fat is over three percent. Therefore, ice milk tends to be lighter tasting and more refreshing than ice cream.

Mr. Sato thought it had a very smooth texture with a pleasant taste that really allowed the sweetness of the raisins to shine through. He could easily see why it had won the 1st Flavor General Election.

What he couldn’t understand, however, was why he had stayed away from Seventeen Ice for so long. It’s just as good as he remembered from when he was a teen, if not better.

And so, when Mr. Sato was 48, it was a very good year. It was a very good year for a flavor election. The winner was Raisin Butter Crunch, and Mr. Sato loved it a bunch. It was the best ice milk he ever ate, when he was 48.

Related: Seventeen Ice
Photos ©SoraNews24
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[ Read in Japanese ]

What frozen snack won Seventeen Ice’s “1st Flavor General Election”?

RocketNews24 - News Japan

More importantly, Mr. Sato finds out if it deserved to win.

When Mr. Sato was 17, it was a very good year. It was a very good year for club activities, and sweet ice cream, bought from vending machines. He was on the school’s soft tennis team, when he was 17.

Yes, Japan’s Seventeen Ice brand of ice cream, which is exclusively sold from vending machines in shopping centers and train station platforms, has been around for a long time and is eternally popular with kids and teens in Japan. It’s been around so long that even our grizzled reporter Mr. Sato fondly recalls enjoying them during his younger days.

The world has changed a lot since then, but Seventeen Ice is still as strong as ever, and recently held its “1st Flavor General Election” in which registered fans could vote for their favorites online. Polling took place between 1 May and 30 June and Mr. Sato was able to get the results the very next day.

So, without further ado, here are the Top 5 Seventeen Ice flavors in Japan:

5 – Crispy Strawberry Choco Mille-Feuille
4 – Custard Purin
3 – Muscat
2 – Colorful Choco (Milk)
1 – Raisin Butter Crunch

Our reporter was surprised by the results, mostly because he had never heard of some of these flavors before. It had been a while since he ate a Seventeen Ice and the scene had changed quite a bit. He used to eat Strawberry Shortcake back in the day, but Crispy Strawberry Choco Mille-Feuille was a whole other ballgame. Clearly kids these days are a lot more sophisticated than he used to be.

However, this seemed like the perfect opportunity to rekindle his love affair with vending machine ice cream, so Mr. Sato sought out Japan’s favorite flavor of Seventeen Ice.

The Raisin Butter Crunch cost 180 yen (US$1.33) and was based on the rum raisin butter sandwich cookies commonly found in Hokkaido and elsewhere in Japan. The cookies were pictured on the wrapper, making it all look even more inviting.

Checking the ingredients, Mr. Sato found that this ice cream cone actually contains 0.1 percent alcohol, so it really does use rum-soaked raisins. It seems like a rather adult taste for a Seventeen Ice flavor.

▼ アルコール分0.1% = Contains 0.1 percent alcohol

He unwrapped his election-winning cone to find it was held in a waffle cone. Originally, Seventeen Ice was served as a cylinder of ice cream on a plastic stick. Some flavors still are, but waffle cone varieties have been increasingly added to the line-up.

The top was sprinkled with crumbled pieces of butter cookie and had an enticing aroma.

By the way, this isn’t technically “ice cream,” but “ice milk.” Ice cream is defined as having over 15 percent milk solid in which the amount of milkfat is over eight percent. On the other hand, ice milk has a milk solid content of over 10 percent, of which the milk fat is over three percent. Therefore, ice milk tends to be lighter tasting and more refreshing than ice cream.

Mr. Sato thought it had a very smooth texture with a pleasant taste that really allowed the sweetness of the raisins to shine through. He could easily see why it had won the 1st Flavor General Election.

What he couldn’t understand, however, was why he had stayed away from Seventeen Ice for so long. It’s just as good as he remembered from when he was a teen, if not better.

And so, when Mr. Sato was 48, it was a very good year. It was a very good year for a flavor election. The winner was Raisin Butter Crunch, and Mr. Sato loved it a bunch. It was the best ice milk he ever ate, when he was 48.

Related: Seventeen Ice
Photos ©SoraNews24
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[ Read in Japanese ]

Lunch at Kyoto Gyoen National Garden, delivered in an Imperial carriage

RocketNews24 - News Japan

This ox-drawn carriage meal holds a bevvy of surprises.

Kyoto is known for its longstanding tradition of serving fine multi-course kaiseki meals, but when you’re visiting the city’s top tourist sites and you want a simple lunch with high visual impact, where’s the best place to go?

In our opinion, you can’t go wrong with a stop at Higakisaryo, a bright and cheerful cafe located at the Nakadachiuri Rest Station on the grounds of Kyoto Gyoen National Garden.

We hadn’t visited the park in a long while, so when we came across the very modern-looking Nakadachiuri Rest Station, we immediately stepped inside for a look around.

There were restrooms and souvenir stores inside, but what really caught our eye was the menu for the Higakisaryo restaurant. Open only during the day, this restaurant serves up a variety of noodle and rice dishes…

▼ …and a very special Goshoguruma Gozen (“Imperial Carriage Set“), which is surprisingly well-priced, at 1,690 yen (US$12.52).

This unusual Carriage Set was something we knew we had to try, so we took a seat and placed an order for it, along with a cold Japanese Black Tea, priced at 450 yen.

Back in the day, ox-drawn carriages known as goshoguruma were only used by the Imperial family and high-ranking nobility. Here at the restaurant, the cart still carries precious cargo, but in the form of delectable dishes, which is something we’ve never seen before.

▼ When it arrived at our table, the Imperial Carriage looked even better than we’d anticipated.

Taking a closer look at the details, we could see the carriage had been beautifully lacquered, and although we tried to roll it, we found that the wheels were fixed, giving it extra stability.

▼ No tabletop cart-racing for us today.

It wasn’t just beautiful on the outside — when we lifted the lids on our tray, the scene became even more majestic.

As seen on the menu, this two-tiered meal comes with Kyoto-style side dishes on the bottom, and a main dish of your choosing on top. We opted for the Seasonal Fish, which gave us a beautifully grilled piece of Spanish mackerel and rice topped with chirimen (young fish) on the side.

The rice with chirimen was moreish and the Spanish mackerel was moist and delicious.

The Kyoto-style side dishes were also incredibly well-made, providing bursts of contrast to the main dish.

▼ Kyoto pickles, eggplant, and tofu were among the delights on offer when we visited.

Each morsel had been carefully made, giving the meal an elegance befitting the carriage it was served in.

▼ And for dessert, a delicious mochi cake.

When we first sat down to eat, we thought the unusual carriage would be the star of the show, but after finishing the meal we realised the food was just as worthy of the spotlight. In fact, the Imperial Carriage Set is so good it’s worthy of becoming a Kyoto specialty in its own right.

For now, though, like a lot of local treasures, it remains one of those little-known gems that only those in-the-know know about.

Restaurant Information

Higakisaryo / 檜垣茶寮
Address: Kyoto-fu, Kyoto-shi, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto Gyoen 3, Kyoto Gyoen National Garden
京都府京都市上京区京都御苑3 京都御苑内
Hours: 10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m. (cafe menu), 11:00 a.m.-3:30p.m. (light meals and lunch sets)
Website

Photos © SoraNews24
● Want to hear about SoraNews24’s latest articles as soon as they’re published? Follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

[ Read in Japanese ]

Lunch at Kyoto Gyoen National Garden, delivered in an Imperial carriage

RocketNews24 - News Japan

This ox-drawn carriage meal holds a bevvy of surprises.

Kyoto is known for its longstanding tradition of serving fine multi-course kaiseki meals, but when you’re visiting the city’s top tourist sites and you want a simple lunch with high visual impact, where’s the best place to go?

In our opinion, you can’t go wrong with a stop at Higakisaryo, a bright and cheerful cafe located at the Nakadachiuri Rest Station on the grounds of Kyoto Gyoen National Garden.

We hadn’t visited the park in a long while, so when we came across the very modern-looking Nakadachiuri Rest Station, we immediately stepped inside for a look around.

There were restrooms and souvenir stores inside, but what really caught our eye was the menu for the Higakisaryo restaurant. Open only during the day, this restaurant serves up a variety of noodle and rice dishes…

▼ …and a very special Goshoguruma Gozen (“Imperial Carriage Set“), which is surprisingly well-priced, at 1,690 yen (US$12.52).

This unusual Carriage Set was something we knew we had to try, so we took a seat and placed an order for it, along with a cold Japanese Black Tea, priced at 450 yen.

Back in the day, ox-drawn carriages known as goshoguruma were only used by the Imperial family and high-ranking nobility. Here at the restaurant, the cart still carries precious cargo, but in the form of delectable dishes, which is something we’ve never seen before.

▼ When it arrived at our table, the Imperial Carriage looked even better than we’d anticipated.

Taking a closer look at the details, we could see the carriage had been beautifully lacquered, and although we tried to roll it, we found that the wheels were fixed, giving it extra stability.

▼ No tabletop cart-racing for us today.

It wasn’t just beautiful on the outside — when we lifted the lids on our tray, the scene became even more majestic.

As seen on the menu, this two-tiered meal comes with Kyoto-style side dishes on the bottom, and a main dish of your choosing on top. We opted for the Seasonal Fish, which gave us a beautifully grilled piece of Spanish mackerel and rice topped with chirimen (young fish) on the side.

The rice with chirimen was moreish and the Spanish mackerel was moist and delicious.

The Kyoto-style side dishes were also incredibly well-made, providing bursts of contrast to the main dish.

▼ Kyoto pickles, eggplant, and tofu were among the delights on offer when we visited.

Each morsel had been carefully made, giving the meal an elegance befitting the carriage it was served in.

▼ And for dessert, a delicious mochi cake.

When we first sat down to eat, we thought the unusual carriage would be the star of the show, but after finishing the meal we realised the food was just as worthy of the spotlight. In fact, the Imperial Carriage Set is so good it’s worthy of becoming a Kyoto specialty in its own right.

For now, though, like a lot of local treasures, it remains one of those little-known gems that only those in-the-know know about.

Restaurant Information

Higakisaryo / 檜垣茶寮
Address: Kyoto-fu, Kyoto-shi, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto Gyoen 3, Kyoto Gyoen National Garden
京都府京都市上京区京都御苑3 京都御苑内
Hours: 10:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m. (cafe menu), 11:00 a.m.-3:30p.m. (light meals and lunch sets)
Website

Photos © SoraNews24
● Want to hear about SoraNews24’s latest articles as soon as they’re published? Follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

[ Read in Japanese ]

Japanese cafe Pronto opens limited-time Stranger Things themed cafe

RocketNews24 - News Japan

Tokyo has an Upside Down too, but this one is delicious.

Stranger Things may not be as popular as Spy X Family in Japan, but it has enough of a following to deserve a cafe! From July 6 to September 9, Japanese cafe Pronto’s Shibuya Fukuras branch will get a Stranger Things makeover called “Stranger Pronto”. The collaboration coincides with the recent release of the later half of Season 4 of the world-famous Netflix series. The cafe will be decorated in a Stranger Things theme and include a completely Stranger Things-themed menu, photo spots, artwork, and more.

▼ Here’s a sneak peek of the menu and some of the art featured (explained below).

Menu items are based on characters from Stranger Things Seasons 1 through 4, including main character Eleven’s first burger (and of course, her favorite waffles), a roast beef pasta plated to look like the infamous Demogorgon monster, and Nancy’s Halloween Party mocktail. There’s even a cream soda made to look like the Upside Down (not pictured above but on the full menu).

Some art they’ll have on display includes trick art of a Demogorgon coming out of a door, the famous Christmas light wall at the Byers’ house, the fiery road to Hawkins (possible spoiler), and the Surfer Boy Pizza van.

▼ This is what the outside of the Shibuya Fukuras Pronto will look like starting July 6.