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Prefectures of Japan Hiroshima

Prefectures of Japan Hiroshima

Prefectures of Japan Hiroshima

Hiroshima Prefecture
広島県
Prefecture
Japanese transcription(s)
• Japanese 広島県
• Rōmaji Hiroshima-ken

Prefectures of Japan Hiroshima – Profile Photos

Prefectures of Japan Hiroshima

Country Japan
Region Chūgoku (San’yō)
Island Honshu
Capital Hiroshima
Subdivisions Districts: 5, Municipalities: 23
Government
• Governor Hidehiko Yuzaki (since November 2009)
Area
• Total 8,479.63 km2 (3,274.00 sq mi)
Area rank 11th
Population (June 1, 2019)
• Total 2,811,410
• Rank 12th
• Density 330/km2 (860/sq mi)
ISO 3166 code JP-34
Website pref.hiroshima.lg.jp
Symbols
Bird Red-throated diver (Gavia stellata)
Tree Japanese maple (Acer palmatum)

Prefectures of Japan Hiroshima

Hiroshima Prefecture (広島県, Hiroshima-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region of Honshu.[1] Hiroshima Prefecture has a population of 2,811,410 (1 June 2019) and has a geographic area of 8,479 km² (3,274 sq mi). Hiroshima Prefecture borders Okayama Prefecture to the east, Tottori Prefecture to the northeast, Shimane Prefecture to the north, and Yamaguchi Prefecture to the southwest.

Hiroshima is the capital and largest city of Hiroshima Prefecture, and the largest city in the Chūgoku region, with other major cities including Fukuyama, Kure, and Higashihiroshima.[2] Hiroshima Prefecture is located on the Seto Inland Sea across from the island of Shikoku, and is bounded to the north by the Chūgoku Mountains. Hiroshima Prefecture is one of the three prefectures of Japan with more than one UNESCO World Heritage Site.

History

The area around Hiroshima was formerly divided into Bingo Province and Aki Province.[3] This location has been a center of trade and culture since the beginning of Japan’s recorded history. Hiroshima is a traditional center of the Chūgoku region and was the seat of the Mōri clan until the Battle of Sekigahara.

Together with Nara and Tokyo, Hiroshima is one of the three prefectures with more than one UNESCO World Heritage Site. The two such sites in Hiroshima Prefecture are:

The Atomic Dome in Hiroshima, one of the few remnants of prewar Hiroshima following the atomic bombing in 1945;
The Itsukushima Shrine in Miyajima, famed for filling with water and appearing to “float” during high tide.

Geography

Hiroshima prefecture lies in the middle of Japan . Most of the prefecture consists of mountains leading towards Shimane Prefecture; and rivers produce rich plains near the coast.

The province faces Shikoku across the Seto Inland Sea. Hiroshima Bay opens on the Inland Sea.[4] The prefecture also includes many small islands.

The sheltered nature of the Inland Sea makes Hiroshima’s climate very mild.

As of 1 April 2014, 4% of the total land area of the prefecture was designated as Natural Parks (the lowest percentage of any prefecture), namely Setonaikai National Park; Hiba-Dōgo-Taishaku and Nishi-Chūgoku Sanchi Quasi-National Parks; and six Prefectural Natural Parks.

Cities

Fourteen cities are located in Hiroshima Prefecture:

Economy

Hiroshima’s main industries include automobiles (Mazda is headquartered there) and tourism in two World Heritage Sites: the A-Bomb dome and Itsukushima Shrine.

Components of the economy are primary industry, secondary industry, and tertiary industry, which compose 0.6%, 32.6%, and 66.2% in 2015. There is 0.6% of unclassified production.[7]

Value of production of manufacturing is 10,343 billion yen in 2016, which is the 10th largest in Japan. After 2012, production of manufacturing is continuously increasing in 2015.

Education

University

Elisabeth University of Music
Fukuyama City University
Fukuyama Heisei University
Fukuyama University
Hijiyama University
Hiroshima Bunka Gakuen University
Hiroshima Bunkyo Women’s University
Hiroshima City University
Hiroshima Institute of Technology
Hiroshima Jogakuin University
Hiroshima Kokusai Gakuin University
Hiroshima Shudo University
Hiroshima University of Economics
Hiroshima University
Japan Coast Guard Academy
Onomichi City University
Prefectural University of Hiroshima
Yasuda Women’s University

 

 

Historical population
YearPop.±% p.a.
18901,319,507—    
19031,508,713+1.04%
19131,691,699+1.15%
19201,541,905−1.32%
19251,617,680+0.96%
19301,692,136+0.90%
19351,804,916+1.30%
19401,869,504+0.71%
19451,885,471+0.17%
19502,081,967+2.00%
19552,149,044+0.64%
19602,184,043+0.32%
19652,281,146+0.87%
19702,436,135+1.32%
19752,646,324+1.67%
19802,739,161+0.69%
19852,819,200+0.58%
19902,849,847+0.22%
19952,881,748+0.22%
20002,878,915−0.02%
20052,876,642−0.02%
20102,860,750−0.11%
20152,844,963−0.11%

Religion

Similar to the rest of Japan, most people in the Hiroshima Prefecture are Shinto or Buddhist. in 1996 51.2% of the population was Buddhist, 2 were affiliated with Shinto Sects, 44.8% practiced Folk Shinto, and 2% were Christian.

Transportation

Railway

JR West
Sanyo Shinkansen
Sanyo Main Line
Kabe Line
Kure Line
Geibi Line
Fukuen Line
Ibara Railway

People movers

Astram Line
Skyrail Service

Streetcars

Hiroshima Electric Railway

Roads

Expressways

Chugoku Expressway
Sanyo Expressway
Shimanami Expressway
Hamada Expressway
Onomichi Expressway
Hiroshima Expressway (West Nippon Expressway Company)
Hiroshima Expressway (urban expressway)

National highways

Route 2
Route 31
Route 54
Route 182
Route 183
Route 185
Route 186
Route 191
Route 261
Route 313
Route 314
Route 317
Route 375
Route 432
Route 433
Route 434
Route 486
Route 487
Route 488

Ports

Kure Port – Ferry route to Edajima, Matsuyama
Hiroshima Port – Ferry route to Miyajima, Edajima, Matsuyama and Beppu, and also International Container hub port
Mihara Port
Onomichi Port
Fukuyama Port – International Container hub port

Airports

Hiroshima Airport

Sports

The sports teams listed below are based in Hiroshima.

Football

Sanfrecce Hiroshima (Hiroshima city)

Baseball

Hiroshima Toyo Carp (Hiroshima city)

Volleyball

JT Thunders (Hiroshima city)

Basketball

Hiroshima Dragonflies
Hiroshima Lightning (Defunct)

Tourism

Hiroshima Peace Memorial
Hiroshima Castle
Shukkei-en
Mitaki Temple
Itsukushima Shrine
Momijidani Park
Mount Misen
Miyajima Public Aquarium
Senkō-ji Temple
Jōdo-ji Temple
Onomichi City Museum of Art
Fukuyama Castle

Famous festivals and events

  • Onomichi Port Festival – held in April
  • Hiroshima Flower Festival – held from May 3 to 5
  • Fukuyama Rose Festival – held in May
  • Enryuji Tokasan Festival – held in June
  • Gion Festival of Onomichi – held in July
  • Innoshima Water-naval Festival – held in August
  • Miyajima Under-water Firework Festival – held on August 14
  • Yassa Festival of Mihara – held in August
  • Saijo Sake Festival – held in October
  • Onomichi Becher Festival – held on November 3
  • Hiroshima Ebisu Festival – held from November 18 to 20

International sister relations

Sichuan Province, China[10]
Hawaii Hawaii, United States of America

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Prefectures of Japan Okayama

Prefectures of Japan Okayama

Prefectures of Japan Okayama

Okayama Prefecture
岡山県
Prefecture
Japanese transcription(s)
• Japanese 岡山県
• Rōmaji Okayama-ken

Prefectures of Japan Okayama – Profile Photos

Prefectures of Japan Okayama

Country Japan
Region Chūgoku (Sanyō)
Island Honshu
Capital Okayama
Subdivisions Districts: 10, Municipalities: 27
Government
• Governor Ryūta Ibaragi
Area
• Total 7,114.50 km2 (2,746.92 sq mi)
Area rank 17th
Population (February 1, 2018)
• Total 1,906,464
• Rank 21st
• Density 270/km2 (690/sq mi)
ISO 3166 code JP-33
Website www.pref.okayama.jp
Symbols
Bird Lesser cuckoo (Cuculus poliocephalus)
Flower Peach blossom (Prunus persica var. vulgaris)
Tree Red pine (Pinus densiflora)

Prefectures of Japan Okayama

Okayama Prefecture (岡山県, Okayama-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region of Honshu.[1] Okayama Prefecture has a population of 1,906,464 (1 February 2018) and has a geographic area of 7,114 km2 (2,746 sq mi). Okayama Prefecture borders Tottori Prefecture to the north, Hyōgo Prefecture to the east, and Hiroshima Prefecture to the west.

Okayama is the capital and largest city of Okayama Prefecture, with other major cities including Kurashiki, Tsuyama, and Sōja.[2][3][4] Okayama Prefecture’s south is located on the Seto Inland Sea coast across from Kagawa Prefecture on the island of Shikoku, which are connected by the Great Seto Bridge, while the north is characterized by the Chūgoku Mountains.

History

Prior to the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the area of present-day Okayama Prefecture was divided between Bitchū, Bizen and Mimasaka Provinces. Okayama Prefecture was formed and named in 1871 as part of the large-scale administrative reforms of the early Meiji period (1868–1912), and the borders of the prefecture were set in 1876.

Geography

Okayama Prefecture borders Hyōgo Prefecture, Tottori Prefecture, and Hiroshima Prefecture.[3] It faces Kagawa Prefecture in Shikoku across the Seto Inland Sea and includes 90 islands in the sea.

Okayama Prefecture is home to the historic town of Kurashiki. Most of the population is concentrated around Kurashiki and Okayama. The small villages in the northern mountain region are aging and declining in population – more than half of the prefecture’s municipalities are officially designated as depopulated.[6]

As of 1 April 2014, 11% of the total land area of the prefecture was designated as Natural Parks, namely the Daisen-Oki and Setonaikai National Parks; the Hyōnosen-Ushiroyama-Nagisan Quasi-National Park; and seven Prefectural Natural Parks.

Cities

Fifteen cities are located in Okayama Prefecture:

Demographics

Per Japanese census data,[8] and,[9] Okayama prefecture has had continual negative population growth since 2005

Historical population
YearPop.±%
19201,218,000—    
19301,284,000+5.4%
19401,329,000+3.5%
19501,661,000+25.0%
19601,670,000+0.5%
19701,707,000+2.2%
19801,871,000+9.6%
19901,926,000+2.9%
20001,950,828+1.3%
20101,945,276−0.3%
20201,920,739−1.3%

 

Education

Universities

Okayama

Okayama University
Notre Dame Seishin University
Okayama University of Science
Okayama Shoka University
Sanyo Gakuen University
Shujitsu University

Kurashiki

Okayama Gakuin University
Kurashiki Sakuyo University
Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare

Soja

Okayama Prefectural University

Tsuyama

Mimasaka University

Niimi

Niimi Public University

High schools

Okayama
Okayama Ichinomiya Senior High School
Okayama Asahi Senior High School
Okayama Sozan Senior High School
Okayama Hosen Senior High School
Okayama Joto Senior High School
Okayama Sakuyo High School[10]
Kurashiki High School

Transportation

Rail

JR West
Sanyo Shinkansen
Sanyo Line
Hakubi Line
Kibi Line
Ako Line
Uno Line
Kishin Line
Geibi Line
Imbi Line
JR West and JR Shikoku
Seto-Ōhashi Line
Honshi-bisan Line
Chizu Express
Ibara Railway
Mizushima Rinkai Railway

Tramways

Okayama Electric Tramway

Roads

Expressways

Sanyo Expressway
Chugoku Expressway
Seto Central Expressway
Yonago Expressway
Okayama Expressway
Tottori Expressway

National highways

Route 2 (Osaka-Kobe-Himeji-Bizen-Okayama-Kurashiki-Asakuchi-Onomichi-Hiroshima-Shunan-Shimonoseki-Kitakyushu)
Route 30 (Okayama-Uno-Takamatsu
Route 53 (Okayama-Tsuyama-Tottori)
Route 179
Route 180 (Okayama-Takahashi-Niimi)
Route 181 (Tsuyama-Maniwa-Yonago-Yasugi-Matsue)
Route 182
Route 183
Route 250 (Okayama-Setouchi-Ako-Aioi-Takasago-Akashi)
Route 313 (Fukuyama-Takahashi-Maniwa-Kurayoshi)
Route 373
Route 374
Route 429
Route 430
Route 482 (Kyotango-Toyooka-Wakasa-Kagamino-Maniwa-Kofu of Tottori
Route 484

Airport

Okayama Airport

Culture

Bizen-yaki (Bizen pottery)
Bizen Osafune/Bitchu Aoe swords

Association with Momotarō legend

Okayama Prefecture is closely associated with the folklore hero, Momotarō. This tale is said to have roots in the legendary story of Kibitsuhiko-no-mikoto and Ura which explains that the Prince Ura of Kudara used to live in Kinojo (castle of the devil) and was a cause of trouble for the people living in the village. The emperor’s government sent Kibitsuhiko-no-mikoto (Momotarō) to defeat Ura. The city of Okayama holds an annual Momotarō-matsuri, or Momotarō Festival.

Sports

The sports teams listed below are based in Okayama.

Football

Fagiano Okayama F.C. (Okayama city)
Mitsubishi Motors Mizushima F.C. (Kurashiki)

Volleyball

Okayama Seagulls (Okayama city)

Tourism

Some tourist attractions are:

Koraku-en Japanese garden in Okayama
Okayama Castle, Okayama
Ki Castle, Sōja
Shizutani School, Bizen
Bikan Historical Area (倉敷美観地区, Kurashiki Bikan Chiku), Kurashiki
Bitchu Matsuyama Castle, Takahashi
Kakuzan Park, Tsuyama
Bisei Astronomical Observatory (美星天文台, Bisei Tenmondai), Ibara Town (following dissolution of Bisei Town)
Maki-do Cave, in Niimi

Notable people

Shin Koyamada, Hollywood actor[12]
Yuko Arimori, marathon runner[13]
Go Ibuki , Japanese actor
Tesshō Genda, voice actor
Ryutaro Hashimoto, Hiranuma Kiichirō, Inukai Tsuyoshi, former Prime Ministers of Japan
Sen’ichi Hoshino, baseball manager
Koshi Inaba, singer
Ichiyo Izawa, pianist and former member of Tokyo Jihen
Shiro Kawase, Imperial Japanese Navy admiral
Yoshio Nishina, known as the Father of Physics in Japan
Yumeji Takehisa, famous and influential early 20th century artist
Sesshu Toyo, suiboku master
Joichiro Tatsuyoshi, boxer
Haruka Fukushima, manga artist
Masashi Kishimoto, manga artist and creator of Naruto[14]
Seishi Kishimoto, manga artist
Daisuke Takahashi, Olympic figure skater
Dorlis, jazz musician
Miyamoto Musashi, samurai
Megumi Fujii, MMA Fighter
Masaki Kajishima, creator of Tenchi Muyo!
Morihiro Hashimoto, darts player

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Prefectures of Japan Shimane

Prefectures of Japan Shimane

Prefectures of Japan Shimane

Shimane Prefecture
島根県
Prefecture
Japanese transcription(s)
• Japanese 島根県
• Rōmaji Shimane-ken

Prefectures of Japan Shimane – Profile Photos

Prefectures of Japan Shimane

Country Japan
Region Chūgoku (San’in)
Island Honshu
Capital Matsue
Subdivisions Districts: 5, Municipalities: 19
Government
• Governor Tatsuya Maruyama
Area
• Total 6,708.26 km2 (2,590.07 sq mi)
Area rank 19th
Population (February 1, 2021)
• Total 665,205
• Rank 46th
• Density 99/km2 (260/sq mi)
ISO 3166 code JP-32
Website www1.pref.shimane.lg.jp/contents/kokusai/kokusai-e/index.html
Symbols
Bird Whooper swan (Cygnus cygnus)
Fish Flying Fish
Flower Moutan peony (Paeonia suffruticosa)
Tree Japanese black pine (Pinus thunbergii)

Prefectures of Japan Shimane

Shimane Prefecture (島根県, Shimane-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region of Honshu.[1] Shimane Prefecture is the second-least populous prefecture of Japan at 665,205 (February 1, 2021) and has a geographic area of 6,708.26 km2. Shimane Prefecture borders Yamaguchi Prefecture to the southwest, Hiroshima Prefecture to the south, and Tottori Prefecture to the east.

Matsue is the capital and largest city of Shimane Prefecture, with other major cities including Izumo, Hamada, and Masuda.[2] Shimane Prefecture contains the majority of the Lake Shinji-Nakaumi metropolitan area centered on Matsue, and with a population of approximately 600,000 is Japan’s second-largest metropolitan area on the Sea of Japan coast after Niigata. Shimane Prefecture is bounded by the Sea of Japan coastline on the north, where two-thirds of the population live, and the Chūgoku Mountains on the south. Shimane Prefecture governs the Oki Islands in the Sea of Japan which juridically includes the disputed Liancourt Rocks (竹島, Takeshima). Shimane Prefecture is home to Izumo-taisha, one of the oldest Shinto shrines in Japan, and the Tokugawa-era Matsue Castle.

History

Early history

The history of Shimane starts with Japanese mythology. The Shinto god Ōkuninushi was believed to live in Izumo, an old province in Shimane. Izumo Shrine, which is in the city of Izumo, honors the god.[3] At that time, the current Shimane prefecture was divided into three parts: Iwami, Izumo, and Oki.[4] That lasted until the abolition of the han system took place in 1871. During the Nara period, Kakinomoto no Hitomaro read a poem on Shimane’s nature when he was sent as the Royal governor.[5]

Later on in the Kamakura period, Kamakura shogunate forced emperors Go-Toba and Godaigo into exile in Oki. Emperor Go-Daigo later escaped away from Oki and began rallying supporters against the shogunate, which succeeded.

Middle Ages

During the Muromachi period, Izumo and Oki were controlled by the Kyogoku clan. However, after the Ōnin War, the Amago clan expanded power based in Gassantoda Castle and the Masuda clan dominated Iwami Province. The Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine was located between Amago territory and Masuda territory, so there were many battles between these clans for the silver. However, in 1566 Mōri Motonari conquered Izumo, Iwami, and Oki.[6] After over 30 years of Mori control, in 1600 Horio Yoshiharu entered Izumo and Oki as the result of Battle of Sekigahara, which Mori lost. Following the change, Horio Yoshiharu decided to move to build Matsue Castle instead of Gassan-Toda, and soon after Yoshiharu’s death the castle was completed. Later in 1638, the grandson of Tokugawa Ieyasu, Matsudaira Naomasa became the ruler because the Horio clan had no heir, and his family ruled until the abolition of the han system.

The Iwami area was split into three regions: the mining district, under the direct control of the Shogunate, the Hamada clan region, and the Tsuwano clan region. The Iwami Ginzan, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site produced silver and was one of the nation’s largest silver mine by the early 17th century. The Hamada clan was on the shogunate’s side in the Meiji Restoration, and the castle was burned down. The Tsuwano clan, despite then being ruled by the Matsudaira, was on the emperor’s side in the restoration.

Modern Age

In 1871, the abolition of the han system placed the old Shimane and Hamada Provinces in the current area of Shimane Prefecture. Later that year, Oki became part of Tottori. In 1876, Hamada Prefecture was merged into the Shimane Prefecture. Also, Tottori Prefecture was added in the same year. However, five years later, in 1881, the current portion of Tottori Prefecture was separated and the current border was formed.

Geography

Shimane Prefecture is situated on the Sea of Japan side of the Chūgoku region. Because of its mountainous landscape, rice farming is done mostly in the Izumo plain where the city of Izumo is located.[8] Another major landform is the Shimane peninsula. The peninsula is located across the Sea of Japan from Izumo to Sakaiminato, which is located in Tottori prefecture. Also, the peninsula created two brackish lakes, Lake Shinji and Nakaumi. The island of Daikon is located in Nakaumi. Off the main island of Honshū, the island of Oki belongs to Shimane prefecture as well. The island itself is in the Daisen-Oki National Park.[8] Shimane also claims the use of Liancourt Rocks, over which they are in dispute with South Korea.[9]

As of 1 April 2012, 6% of the total land area of the prefecture was designated as Natural Parks, namely Daisen-Oki National Park; Hiba-Dōgo-Taishaku and Nishi-Chūgoku Sanchi Quasi-National Parks; and eleven Prefectural Natural Parks.[10]

Most major cities are located either on the seaside, or along a river.

Cities

Eight cities are located in Shimane Prefecture, the largest in population being Matsue, the capital, and the smallest being Gōtsu. The cities Masuda, Unnan, Yasugi, and Gōtsu had a slight population increase due to the mergers in the early 2000s.

Climate

The prefecture has a sub-tropical climate. Winter is cloudy with a little snow, and summer is humid. The average annual temperature is 14.6 °C (58.3 °F). It rains almost every day in the rainy season, from June to mid-July. The highest average monthly temperature occurs in August with 26.3 °C (79.3 °F). The average annual precipitation is 1,799 millimetres (70.8 in), higher than Tokyo’s 1,467 mm (57.8 in) and Obihiro with 920 mm (36.2 in).

Transportation

Airports

Three airports serve Shimane. The Izumo Airport located in Izumo is the largest airport in the prefecture in terms of passengers, which has regular flights to Haneda Airport, Osaka Airport, Fukuoka Airport, and Oki Airport. The Iwami Airport has two flights each day to Haneda and Osaka and 2 arrivals. Oki Airport has scheduled flights to Osaka and Izumo Airports.

Izumo Airport
Iwami Airport
Oki Airport

Rail

JR West and Ichibata Electric Railway serves the prefecture in terms of rail transportation. The Sanin Main Line goes through the prefecture on the Sea of Japan side going into major cities such as Matsue and Izumo.[13] Izumoshi and Matsue stations are the major stops in the prefecture. The Kisuki line, which forks from Shinji Station on the Sanin Line, connects with the Geibi Line in Hiroshima Prefecture, cutting into the Chūgoku Mountains.[13] Ichibata Electric Railway serve the Shimane peninsula from Dentetsu-Izumoshi Station and Izumo Taisha-mae Station to Matsue Shinjiko-Onsen Station.[14]

JR West has three Limited Express trains to Shimane, which are Super Matsukaze, Super Oki, and Yakumo.[15] Additionally, the overnight limited express Sunrise Izumo operates daily between Tokyo and Izumoshi.

West Japan Railway Company
Sanin Main Line
Sankō Line
Kisuki Line
Yamaguchi Line
Ichibata Electric Railway
Kita-Matsue Line
Taisha Line

Roads

General Roads

Japan National Route 9
Izumo Bypass
Gōtsu Road
Japan National Route 54
Japan National Route 180
Japan National Route 184
Japan National Route 186
Japan National Route 187
Japan National Route 191
Japan National Route 261
Japan National Route 314
Japan National Route 375
Japan National Route 431
Japan National Route 432
Japan National Route 485
Japan National Route 488

 

Highways

The four expressways in the prefecture connect major cities with other prefectures. The Matsue expressway connects Matsue with Unnan and Yonago in Tottori prefecture. Hamada Expressway forks from the Chūgoku Expressway at Kita-Hiroshima and stretches to Hamada.[8]

Sanin Expressway
Matsue Expressway
Hamada Expressway
Chūgoku Expressway

Ferry/High Speed Boats

Oki Kisen

Economy

In Shimane, the largest employer is the retail industry, employing over 60,000 workers. The supermarket, Mishimaya, and the hardware store, Juntendo, are examples of companies based in Shimane. The manufacturing industry has the second number of employees with 49,000 workers.

Companies based in Shimane

Manufacturing

Izumo Murata Manufacturing
Shimane Fujitsu
Mitsubishi Agricultural Machinery

Financial

The Shimane Bank
The San-in Godo Bank

Others

Network Applied Communication Laboratory
Mishimaya
Juntendo
Ichibata Electric Railway

Major factories

Hitachi Metals

Demographics

One-third of the prefecture’s population is concentrated in the Izumo–Matsue area. Otherwise, over two-thirds of the population is on the coastline. The reason is that the Chūgoku Mountains make the land inland harder to inhabit. The capital, Matsue, has the smallest population out of all the 47 prefectural capitals. Shimane has also the largest percentage of the elderly.[11] The province had an estimated 743 centenarians per million inhabitants in September 2010, the highest ratio in Japan, overtaking Okinawa Prefecture (667 centenarians per million).

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1920715,000—    
1930740,000+3.5%
1940741,000+0.1%
1950913,000+23.2%
1960889,000−2.6%
1970773,575−13.0%
1980784,795+1.5%
1990781,021−0.5%
2000761,503−2.5%
2010717,397−5.8%
2020679,626−5.3%

Culture

Cultural Assets

World Cultural Heritage

The Historic Remains of Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine and its Cultural Background (Ōda City)

National Treasures

Izumo-taisha Main Shrine (Izumo City)
Kamosu Shrine Main Shrine (Matsue City)
Toiletry case with autumn field and deer design (Izumo-taisha)
Armour Laced with white thread (Hinomisaki Shrine)
Bronze bells from the Kamo-Iwakura site Unearthed bronze bell-shaped vessel (Unnan City)
Kojindani Ruins Unearthed ruins (Izumo City)

Important Traditional Building Preservation Area

Ōmori (Ōda City)
Yunotsu (Ōda City)

Languages (Dialects)

Unpaku dialect (Izumo dialect, Oki dialect, etc.)
Iwami dialect

Universities in Shimane Prefecture

Shimane University, Matsue and Izumo (National university)[19]
The University of Shimane, Hamada (Prefectural university)

Tourism

Shimane Vogel Park
Matsue Castle
Adachi Museum of Art
Aquas Aquarium
Iwami Ginzan Silver Mine
Izumo-taisha
Izumo Province
Shimane Art Museum
Iwami Art Museum
Mt. Sanbe
Tamatsukuri Onsen

Prefectural symbols

The prefectural flower is the mountain peony. On the island of Daikonjima, they were grown from at least the 18th century.

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Prefectures of Japan Tottori

Prefectures of Japan Tottori

Prefectures of Japan Tottori

Tottori Prefecture
鳥取県
Prefecture
Japanese transcription(s)
• Japanese 鳥取県
• Rōmaji Tottori-ken

Prefectures of Japan Tottori – Profile Photos

Prefectures of Japan Tottori

Country Japan
Region Chūgoku (San’in)
Island Honshu
Capital Tottori
Subdivisions Districts: 5, Municipalities: 19
Government
• Governor Shinji Hirai
Area
• Total 3,507.05 km2 (1,354.08 sq mi)
Area rank 41st
Population (June 1, 2016)
• Total 570,569
• Rank 47th
• Density 163/km2 (420/sq mi)
ISO 3166 code JP-31
Website www.pref.tottori.lg.jp
Symbols
Bird Mandarin duck (Aix galericulata)
Flower Nijisseiki nashi pear blossom (Pyrus pyrifolia)
Tree Daisenkyaraboku (Taxus cuspidata)

Prefectures of Japan Tottori

Tottori Prefecture (鳥取県, Tottori-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region of Honshu.[1] Tottori Prefecture is the least populous prefecture of Japan at 570,569 (2016) and has a geographic area of 3,507 km2 (1,354 sq mi). Tottori Prefecture borders Shimane Prefecture to the west, Hiroshima Prefecture to the southwest, Okayama Prefecture to the south, and Hyōgo Prefecture to the east.

Tottori is the capital and largest city of Tottori Prefecture, with other major cities including Yonago, Kurayoshi, and Sakaiminato.[2] Tottori Prefecture is home to the Tottori Sand Dunes, the largest sand dunes system in Japan, and Mount Daisen, the highest peak in the Chūgoku Mountains.

 

Etymology

The word “Tottori” in Japanese is formed from two kanji characters. The first, 鳥, means “bird” and the second, 取 means “to get”. Early residents in the area made their living catching the region’s plentiful waterfowl. The name first appears in the Nihon shoki in the 23rd year of the Emperor Suinin (213 AD) when Yukuha Tana, an elder from the Izumo, visits the emperor. The imperial Prince Homatsu-wake was unable to speak, despite being 30 years of age.

“Yukuha Tana presented the swan to the emperor. Homatsu-wake no Mikoto played with this swan and at last learned to speak. Therefore, Yukaha Tana was liberally rewarded, and was granted the title of Tottori no Miyakko.” (Aston, translation)

Early history

Tottori Prefecture was settled very early in the prehistoric period of Japan, as evidenced by remains from the Jōmon period (14,000 – 300 BC).[4] The prefecture has the remains of the largest known Yayoi period (300 BC – 250 AD) settlement in Japan, the Mukibanda Yayoi remains, located in the low foothills of Mount Daisen[5] in the cities of Daisen and Yonago.[6] Numerous kofun tumuli from the Kofun period (250 – 538) are located across the prefecture.[7] In 645, under the Taika reforms, the area in present-day Tottori Prefecture became two provinces, Hōki and Inaba.

Later history

During the Genpei War (1180–1185) between the Taira and Minamoto clans in the late-Heian period, Tottori became a base for anti-Taira forces, specifically at two temples, Daisen-ji and Sanbutsu-ji. By the beginning of the Kamakura period (1185–1333) shōen estates were established to directly support the Imperial court and various temples. Successive clans controlled the region during the Sengoku period (15th to 17th century), most notably the Yamana clan, but after the Battle of Sekigahara in 1600 the region was pacified. The Tokugawa shogunate installed the Ikeda clan at Tottori Castle. The clan retained control of the area until throughout the Edo period (1603–1868) and the resources of the area financially and materially supported the shogunate.

Modern history

The two provinces remained in place until the Meiji Restoration in 1868, and the boundaries of Tottori Prefecture were established in 1888.[4] After the occupation of Korea and Taiwan in the 20th century, and the establishment of the Manchukuo puppet state in 1932, Tottori’s harbors on the Japan Sea served as an active transit point for goods between Japan and the colonial areas. Before the end of World War II the prefecture was hit by a massive magnitude 7.2 earthquake, the 1943 Tottori earthquake, which destroyed 80% of the city of Tottori, and greatly damaged the surrounding area. In the postwar period land reform was carried out in the prefecture, resulting in a great increase of agricultural production.

Geography

Tottori is home to the Tottori Sand Dunes, Japan’s only large dune system. As of 1 April 2012, 14% of the total land area of the prefecture was designated as Natural Parks, namely the Daisen-Oki and Sanin Kaigan National Parks; Hiba-Dōgo-Taishaku and Hyōnosen-Ushiroyama-Nagisan Quasi-National Parks; and Misasa-Tōgōko, Nishi Inaba, and Okuhino Prefectural Natural Parks.[10]

Mount Misumi is located within the former area of Mochigase that was merged into the city of Tottori in 2004.

Demographics

Per Japanese census data,[11][12] Tottori is the least populated prefecture in Japan.

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1920455,000—    
1930489,000+7.5%
1940484,000−1.0%
1950600,000+24.0%
1960599,000−0.2%
1970569,000−5.0%
1980604,000+6.2%
1990616,000+2.0%
2000613,289−0.4%
2010588,667−4.0%
2020560,517−4.8%

Economy

Tottori Prefecture is heavily agricultural and its products are shipped to the major cities of Japan. Some of the famous products are the nashi pear, nagaimo yam, Japanese scallion, negi, and watermelon. The prefecture is also a major producer of rice.

Language

Historically, the region had extensive linguistic diversity. While the standard Tokyo dialect of the Japanese language is now used in Tottori Prefecture, several other dialects are also used. Many of them are grouped with Western Japanese, and include the Chugoku and Umpaku dialects.

Sports

The sports teams listed below are based in Tottori.

Football (soccer)
Gainare Tottori (Yonago)

Education

Universities

Tottori University
Tottori University of Environmental Studies

Colleges

Tottori College

Noted places

Tottori City

Tottori Sand Dunes
Jinpūkaku, a late Meiji period residence

Daisen

Daisen, the highest of the Chūgoku Mountains, 1,729 m (5,673 ft)

Daisen and Yonago

Mukibanda Yayoi remains, the largest site of Yayoi period settlement in Japan

Yonago and Sakaiminato

Nakaumi, a brackish lake located between Tottori Prefecture and Shimane Prefecture, fifth largest lake in Japan

Misasa

Misasa Onsen
Sanbutsu-ji, a Heian period temple designated a National Treasure of Japan

Sakaiminato

Kitarō Road, a street in Sakaiminato dedicated to Shigeru Mizuki’s GeGeGe no Kitaro manga character
Lake Koyama

Iwami

Uradome Coast, a scenic ria coastal inlet

Chizu

The Ishitani Residence, an Edo period family residence designated a National Treasure of Japan

Nanbu

Tottori Hanakairo-Flower Park, the largest flower park in Japan

Transportation

Rail

JR West
Sanin Line
Hakubi Line
Imbi Line
Sakai Line
Wakasa Railway
Chizu Express

Roads

Expressway and toll roads

Tottori Expressway
 Yonago Expressway
 Sanin Expressway
 Shidosaka Pass Road
 Tottori-Toyooka-Miyazu Road

National highways

Route 9
Route 29 (Tottori-Shiso-Himeji)
Route 53 (Tottori-Tsuyama-Okayama)
Route 178
Route 179
Route 180
Route 181 (Yonago-Niimi-Okayama)
Route 183
Route 313
Route 373
Route 431
Route 482

Ports

Sakaiminato Port – ferry route to Oki Island, and international container hub

Airports

Tottori Airport
Yonago Airport

Prefectural symbols

The symbol is derived from the first mora in Japanese for “と” combined with the picture of a flying bird, and symbolizes peace, liberty, and the advancement of the Tottori prefecture. It was enacted in 1968 to celebrate the 100th year from the first year of the Meiji Era.

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