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Shortlist for LJ Ross’ Northern Photography Prize announced

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Published3 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Michelle WilliamsThe shortlist for this year’s Northern Photography Prize has been announced.The award was set up in 2021 by crime writer LJ Ross to celebrate images of the North East of England, where she is based and sets most of her books.A £1,000 prize is available in two categories, landscape and portrait.The winner will be announced on 31 September with the entries on display at a free exhibition at the Biscuit Factory in Newcastle from 10 to 23 September. The finalists in the landscape category are:Image source, Carole ReahIt’s a swell day at Spittal Beach by Carole Reah from Berwick who said this “magical moment” was one of the first images she took after returning to photography following a permanent brain injury in 2018.Image source, Peter BakerLooking Grim by Peter Baker from Royston in Hertfordshire who sought to take a picture of the Angel of the North from a different angle than might normally be seen.Image source, Angus ReidWatching a Winter Sunrise at Sycamore Gap by Angus Reid from Hexham was one of several attempts the photographer made to catch a winter sunrise, with him finally striking lucky when two walkers unwittingly posed to make the perfect shot at about 09:00 BST on a November morning.Image source, Jim ScottEarly Birds of Lindisfarne by Jim Scott of Morpeth was a reward for the photographer’s patience as, having seen the flock resting on the sand at Holy Island, he decided to wait a while for them all to take off again.Image source, Charles HepplethwiteAutumn Sundown Alnmouth Harbour by Charles Hepplewhite from Gosforth was one of a series of images the photographer took while walking around Alnmouth one day in the “sea mist and failing sunlight”.The finalists in the portrait category are:Image source, David CoserThe Journey by David Coser from Hartlepool was influenced by artist David Hockney due to “the one-point perspective and simplicity”, Mr Coser said, with the photographer wondering what the two friends were thinking as they looked out to sea.Image source, Matthew LockeBack on Track by Matthew Locke of Morpeth features the photographer’s wife looking out of the window on a trip to Newcastle, with Mr Locke saying: “The fact we were moving towards the light she was looking at struck me as symbolic of how we hoped the future would transpire.” Image source, Ian BellEye Contact by Ian Bell of Killingworth in North Tyneside was taken at the viewing room of the Baltic arts centre in Gateshead which Mr Bell said was a “fascinating place for people watching”.Image source, Elisha Scott A Special Helping Hand by Elisha Scott of Newcastle was taken on a cold January evening and features two people having fun at the foot of the Angel of the North while birds flew past making the moment “extra special”. All pictures are subject to copyright.More on this storyFinal photos for crime author’s prize revealed21 August 2021The crime writer making a killing self-publishing19 September 2021Related Internet LinksNorthern Photography PrizeThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Shortlist for LJ Ross’ Northern Photography Prize announced

BBC News

Published3 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Michelle WilliamsThe shortlist for this year’s Northern Photography Prize has been announced.The award was set up in 2021 by crime writer LJ Ross to celebrate images of the North East of England, where she is based and sets most of her books.A £1,000 prize is available in two categories, landscape and portrait.The winner will be announced on 31 September with the entries on display at a free exhibition at the Biscuit Factory in Newcastle from 10 to 23 September. The finalists in the landscape category are:Image source, Carole ReahIt’s a swell day at Spittal Beach by Carole Reah from Berwick who said this “magical moment” was one of the first images she took after returning to photography following a permanent brain injury in 2018.Image source, Peter BakerLooking Grim by Peter Baker from Royston in Hertfordshire who sought to take a picture of the Angel of the North from a different angle than might normally be seen.Image source, Angus ReidWatching a Winter Sunrise at Sycamore Gap by Angus Reid from Hexham was one of several attempts the photographer made to catch a winter sunrise, with him finally striking lucky when two walkers unwittingly posed to make the perfect shot at about 09:00 BST on a November morning.Image source, Jim ScottEarly Birds of Lindisfarne by Jim Scott of Morpeth was a reward for the photographer’s patience as, having seen the flock resting on the sand at Holy Island, he decided to wait a while for them all to take off again.Image source, Charles HepplethwiteAutumn Sundown Alnmouth Harbour by Charles Hepplewhite from Gosforth was one of a series of images the photographer took while walking around Alnmouth one day in the “sea mist and failing sunlight”.The finalists in the portrait category are:Image source, David CoserThe Journey by David Coser from Hartlepool was influenced by artist David Hockney due to “the one-point perspective and simplicity”, Mr Coser said, with the photographer wondering what the two friends were thinking as they looked out to sea.Image source, Matthew LockeBack on Track by Matthew Locke of Morpeth features the photographer’s wife looking out of the window on a trip to Newcastle, with Mr Locke saying: “The fact we were moving towards the light she was looking at struck me as symbolic of how we hoped the future would transpire.” Image source, Ian BellEye Contact by Ian Bell of Killingworth in North Tyneside was taken at the viewing room of the Baltic arts centre in Gateshead which Mr Bell said was a “fascinating place for people watching”.Image source, Elisha Scott A Special Helping Hand by Elisha Scott of Newcastle was taken on a cold January evening and features two people having fun at the foot of the Angel of the North while birds flew past making the moment “extra special”. All pictures are subject to copyright.More on this storyFinal photos for crime author’s prize revealed21 August 2021The crime writer making a killing self-publishing19 September 2021Related Internet LinksNorthern Photography PrizeThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Dame Deborah James’s mother on life without her daughter

BBC News

Before she died, Dame Deborah James told her family to enjoy their lives, her mother has told BBC Breakfast.Speaking for the first time since her daughter’s passing on 28 June, Heather James said she felt heartache for not being able to do anything when the family learned that Dame Deborah was going to die. The campaigner, blogger, broadcaster and former teacher died at home after receiving end-of-life care for bowel cancer and had raised millions for cancer research.

Dame Deborah James’s mother on life without her daughter

BBC News

Before she died, Dame Deborah James told her family to enjoy their lives, her mother has told BBC Breakfast.Speaking for the first time since her daughter’s passing on 28 June, Heather James said she felt heartache for not being able to do anything when the family learned that Dame Deborah was going to die. The campaigner, blogger, broadcaster and former teacher died at home after receiving end-of-life care for bowel cancer and had raised millions for cancer research.

Staffordshire nurse helps woman through premature birth on plane

BBC News

Published2 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Sheryl Pascua Two off-duty nurses helped deliver a baby in mid-air when a mum went into labour prematurely on a flight to the Philippines.Sheryl Pascua and her husband Ruel stepped in after cabin crew appealed for medical staff to assist the six months-pregnant woman. After thinking she was having false contractions, Mrs Pascua said she was shocked to see the baby’s head.The couple, of Staffordshire, safely delivered the boy minutes later.Cabin staff erected a tent around the woman, also named Sheryl, while the nurses tended to her on 2 August, the Stoke Sentinel reported.Mrs Pascua, who works in care for NG Healthcare in Trentham, told the BBC she felt a bit nervous as she had not delivered a baby a since working in the Philippines four years ago.After carrying out an internal examination, she discovered that the baby was crowning and she “could see hair”.’Everyone was praying'”I was on top of her with my knees between her legs… all I can remember was it was so quick,” she said.She told her to “bear down” when she had the next contraction and the baby boy was born.”My husband is already behind me with his gloves, ready to catch the baby,” she said.”Can you imagine the size of the baby? It’s the palm of my husband.”Image source, Sheryl Pascua The baby was given some oxygen but really needed to be in an incubator and on a ventilator, she said.”Everybody on board was praying and I could see the unity and the team work of the cabin crews, us nurses and the Filipino community on board, so we help each other,” she said.It was nine hours before the flight reached its destination and the family could go to hospital.Mrs Pascua said she has been in touch with Sheryl since who told her her son was initially put on a ventilator or life support, but has since recovered.She said she and her husband, who return to the UK next month, were happy to help.”For me and my husband, when help is needed we are always there and people know this of us,” she added.Follow BBC West Midlands on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Send your story ideas to: [email protected] on this storyWoman applauded after giving birth on flight1 FebruaryAfghan fleeing to UK gives birth at 30,000 feet28 August 2021

Staffordshire nurse helps woman through premature birth on plane

BBC News

Published2 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Sheryl Pascua Two off-duty nurses helped deliver a baby in mid-air when a mum went into labour prematurely on a flight to the Philippines.Sheryl Pascua and her husband Ruel stepped in after cabin crew appealed for medical staff to assist the six months-pregnant woman. After thinking she was having false contractions, Mrs Pascua said she was shocked to see the baby’s head.The couple, of Staffordshire, safely delivered the boy minutes later.Cabin staff erected a tent around the woman, also named Sheryl, while the nurses tended to her on 2 August, the Stoke Sentinel reported.Mrs Pascua, who works in care for NG Healthcare in Trentham, told the BBC she felt a bit nervous as she had not delivered a baby a since working in the Philippines four years ago.After carrying out an internal examination, she discovered that the baby was crowning and she “could see hair”.’Everyone was praying'”I was on top of her with my knees between her legs… all I can remember was it was so quick,” she said.She told her to “bear down” when she had the next contraction and the baby boy was born.”My husband is already behind me with his gloves, ready to catch the baby,” she said.”Can you imagine the size of the baby? It’s the palm of my husband.”Image source, Sheryl Pascua The baby was given some oxygen but really needed to be in an incubator and on a ventilator, she said.”Everybody on board was praying and I could see the unity and the team work of the cabin crews, us nurses and the Filipino community on board, so we help each other,” she said.It was nine hours before the flight reached its destination and the family could go to hospital.Mrs Pascua said she has been in touch with Sheryl since who told her her son was initially put on a ventilator or life support, but has since recovered.She said she and her husband, who return to the UK next month, were happy to help.”For me and my husband, when help is needed we are always there and people know this of us,” she added.Follow BBC West Midlands on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Send your story ideas to: [email protected] on this storyWoman applauded after giving birth on flight1 FebruaryAfghan fleeing to UK gives birth at 30,000 feet28 August 2021

Crown Paints: Hannah & Dave ad prompts dozens of complaints

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Published8 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Crown PaintsThe advertising watchdog has received dozens of complaint about a paint advert which a comedian called “massively offensive”.The Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) said it was considering investigating Crown Paints’ “Hannah & Dave” advert.Comic Jenny Eclair said it must be taken off air over its implication that a woman “conned a man into fatherhood”.Apologising for it, the Darwen-based paint firm said it appreciated “people have differing views on humour”.The advert, part of a series called Life Stories, includes a song about the four-year relationship between the characters Hannah and Dave.The lyrics state that “now a baby’s coming and they don’t know what it is”, before continuing: “Hannah’s hoping for a girl, Dave’s just hoping that it’s his.”‘Broadly well received’Tweeting about the advert being “beyond mad”, Eclair said the line was “massively offensive”.She added that Crown Paints needed to “get that offensive baby ad off air” as its creators had “basically… set up a scenario that implies a woman has possibly conned a man into fatherhood”.Replying, author and podcast host Daisy Buchanan said she welcomed Eclair’s tweet as “I honestly thought it was me being mad”.Other Twitter users responding to Eclair’s tweet said the advert was “offensive”, “misogynistic” and a “serious error of judgement”.Hey @crownpaints get that offensive baby ad off air – what were you thinking !!!? What on earth possessed you?— Jenny Eclair (@jennyeclair) August 10, 2022
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on TwitterIn a statement, a spokeswoman for the paint firm said the series of ads were “intended to be a humorous celebration of special life moments that prompt people to paint their homes, in this case focusing on Hannah and Dave, a happy couple expecting a baby together”. “Whilst the ad has been broadly well received, we appreciate that people have differing views on humour and we apologise if any of the lyrics have caused offence,” she added.Reacting to the company’s explanation, blogger and radio presenter Nickie O’Hara said their “gaslighting responses” was “just abhorrent”.An ASA spokeswoman said it had received 58 complaints about the advert and was “currently assessing [them] carefully to determine whether there are grounds for an investigation”.Why not follow BBC North West on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? You can also send story ideas to [email protected] Internet LinksCrown PaintsAdvertising Standards AuthorityThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Crown Paints: Hannah & Dave ad prompts dozens of complaints

BBC News

Published8 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Crown PaintsThe advertising watchdog has received dozens of complaint about a paint advert which a comedian called “massively offensive”.The Advertising Standards Agency (ASA) said it was considering investigating Crown Paints’ “Hannah & Dave” advert.Comic Jenny Eclair said it must be taken off air over its implication that a woman “conned a man into fatherhood”.Apologising for it, the Darwen-based paint firm said it appreciated “people have differing views on humour”.The advert, part of a series called Life Stories, includes a song about the four-year relationship between the characters Hannah and Dave.The lyrics state that “now a baby’s coming and they don’t know what it is”, before continuing: “Hannah’s hoping for a girl, Dave’s just hoping that it’s his.”‘Broadly well received’Tweeting about the advert being “beyond mad”, Eclair said the line was “massively offensive”.She added that Crown Paints needed to “get that offensive baby ad off air” as its creators had “basically… set up a scenario that implies a woman has possibly conned a man into fatherhood”.Replying, author and podcast host Daisy Buchanan said she welcomed Eclair’s tweet as “I honestly thought it was me being mad”.Other Twitter users responding to Eclair’s tweet said the advert was “offensive”, “misogynistic” and a “serious error of judgement”.Hey @crownpaints get that offensive baby ad off air – what were you thinking !!!? What on earth possessed you?— Jenny Eclair (@jennyeclair) August 10, 2022
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.View original tweet on TwitterIn a statement, a spokeswoman for the paint firm said the series of ads were “intended to be a humorous celebration of special life moments that prompt people to paint their homes, in this case focusing on Hannah and Dave, a happy couple expecting a baby together”. “Whilst the ad has been broadly well received, we appreciate that people have differing views on humour and we apologise if any of the lyrics have caused offence,” she added.Reacting to the company’s explanation, blogger and radio presenter Nickie O’Hara said their “gaslighting responses” was “just abhorrent”.An ASA spokeswoman said it had received 58 complaints about the advert and was “currently assessing [them] carefully to determine whether there are grounds for an investigation”.Why not follow BBC North West on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? You can also send story ideas to [email protected] Internet LinksCrown PaintsAdvertising Standards AuthorityThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Blackmore Bond collapse: FCA failed to act before people lost life savings

BBC News

Published11 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThe financial watchdog has been accused of failing to act on warnings about a doomed property investment scheme that saw people lose their life savings.Some 2,000 people lost £46m when Blackmore Bond collapsed. It was claimed a marketing company had used suspect tactics to sell to ordinary people, not experienced investors.The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) did not intervene for two years. The FCA said it was not its duty to step in but MPs want an inquiry.The FCA’s then chief Andrew Bailey – now head of the Bank of England – declined to comment.Andrew Bailey’s ‘slow and steady’ rise to power’Regulator failed’ in London Capital scandalThe bond was set up to invest money into UK property developments and the proceeds would supposedly pay back the investors. Blackmore was offering up to 10% per year in interest payments. The scheme, known as a mini-bond, should by law only be sold to experienced investors, however it was marketed to ordinary people. The bond collapsed in 2020 amid allegations of suspect sales tactics and inappropriate payments. Direct warnings about the tactics of a company marketing the Blackmore Bond were made to the FCA in 2017 and 2018. An investigation for BBC Panorama reveals evidence suggesting the FCA could have acted earlier – and may have tried to cover up the fact it did not.Cross-party MPs, including members of the Treasury Select Committee, have called for an inquiry into the FCA’s handling of the Blackmore Bond.Blackmore victim Paul Stevens, who was forced to retire from work due to an auto-immune disease called myasthenia gravis, invested his ill-health retirement benefit into the fund.He has been left devastated by the loss and says it has made his illness worse.”Like many others, we invested a significant amount of money and, as a family, we lost £40,000,” he said. “These schemes must stop and the FCA needs to police them.”His wife, Jane, said: “We feel as if we’ve been turned over twice – first by Blackmore, then by the FCA.”Panorama: The Billion-Pound Savings ScandalEach year, an estimated billion pounds is lost in failed investment schemes. Panorama tells the story of one of them as its member challenge the regulators they believe failed themWatch Now on BBC iPlayer (UK Only)Paul Carlier, a finance and banking expert, first reported his concerns about the marketing of the Blackmore Bond to the FCA in 2017.His office at the time was next door to the company that was tasked with selling the bond. He overheard their activities and reported them for using high-pressure “boiler room” sales tactics, which are banned. “[The sales people] were literally cold-calling people and approaching people with an intent to sell them a toxic or worthless investment product, including the Blackmore Bond,” he told BBC Panorama.Mr Carlier said the office walls were so thin he could hear their pushy techniques, as well as them clapping and high-fiving when they managed to make someone commit to investing. In 2018, he learned that the sales company was still in operation and warned the FCA again, this time escalating the warning to the regulator’s then chief executive, Mr Bailey.”And yet another £10m-plus was invested after he was aware of it, through from the remainder of 2018 and into 2019,” said Mr Carlier. “It’s astonishing. I don’t know what more you could have done. I entrusted them to deal with it, and they didn’t.”Mr Bailey now has a pivotal position managing the national economy, as head of the Bank of England.In total, £30m was invested into the Blackmore fund after the first warning in 2017.When Mr Carlier again complained to the FCA about its lack of action, the regulator sent a draft response to him – he believes by mistake – which contained a sentence apparently admitting the FCA was at fault. The line said: “However, I consider there was a missed opportunity to reconsider and act on the intelligence you provided.” But this line had been crossed through, implying that Mr Carlier wasn’t supposed to see it. He was only able to because someone had left the track-changes feature on, which showed a history of all edits to the documents. “Somebody has sought to conceal that,” he told the BBC. “That is the definition of a cover-up.”The FCA has denied that it attempted to cover up its actions and said the letter to Mr Carlier was changed because “further evidence came to light”.MP Kevin Hollinrake, who sits on the Treasury Sub-Committee on Financial Services Regulations, is among those calling for fundamental reform of the regulator: “I’d like to say this is a one-off case, but the reality is we see the succession of cases like this where the FCA has failed and it has failed here again.”He also criticised Mr Bailey and the FCA for its handling of other failed investment funds, such as London Capital and Finance, which collapsed in 2019, leading to 11,600 investors losing £237m.That failure led to an inquiry by former Court of Appeal Judge, Dame Elizabeth Gloster, and compensation for the victims. The MPs believe the same should happen in the case of Blackmore.Mr Stevens and other Blackmore Bond investors outlined how the fund’s collapse had impacted them in front of MPs and members of the House of Lords at a special meeting in June.Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Susan Kramer said an inquiry was needed “to deliver some justice for the people who, essentially, were scammed in an entirely public and, what should have been, regulated setting”.The BBC Panorama film also follows other Blackmore investors who, believing they had been abandoned by the authorities, set out to uncover evidence relating to Blackmore Bond themselves.The FCA and other authorities have not taken any action against the Blackmore directors, Phillip Nunn and Patrick McCreesh.The FCA has denied it was responsible for the Blackmore investors’ losses. It said it was examining the way the bond’s promotional material was approved, but said investors were warned of the risks and had to confirm they understood them and could afford to lose the money.Andrew Bailey declined to comment to Panorama on his performance at the FCA.Image source, ReutersPhillip Nunn, who has been bankrupted in connection with one Blackmore Bond development, did not reply to any of Panorama’s questions, despite repeated requests.Patrick McCreesh denied any wrongdoing and said the Blackmore Bond was a potentially profitable, properly run business. He said the risks of investing were fully explained, vulnerable people were not targeted and Blackmore had stopped working with the sales company which had been reported to the FCA. Mr McCreesh also admitted some business decisions were not right and apologised. He said he has suffered hardship and insists, as a director, he always acted properly and in the best interests of the business.

Blackmore Bond collapse: FCA failed to act before people lost life savings

BBC News

Published11 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThe financial watchdog has been accused of failing to act on warnings about a doomed property investment scheme that saw people lose their life savings.Some 2,000 people lost £46m when Blackmore Bond collapsed. It was claimed a marketing company had used suspect tactics to sell to ordinary people, not experienced investors.The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) did not intervene for two years. The FCA said it was not its duty to step in but MPs want an inquiry.The FCA’s then chief Andrew Bailey – now head of the Bank of England – declined to comment.Andrew Bailey’s ‘slow and steady’ rise to power’Regulator failed’ in London Capital scandalThe bond was set up to invest money into UK property developments and the proceeds would supposedly pay back the investors. Blackmore was offering up to 10% per year in interest payments. The scheme, known as a mini-bond, should by law only be sold to experienced investors, however it was marketed to ordinary people. The bond collapsed in 2020 amid allegations of suspect sales tactics and inappropriate payments. Direct warnings about the tactics of a company marketing the Blackmore Bond were made to the FCA in 2017 and 2018. An investigation for BBC Panorama reveals evidence suggesting the FCA could have acted earlier – and may have tried to cover up the fact it did not.Cross-party MPs, including members of the Treasury Select Committee, have called for an inquiry into the FCA’s handling of the Blackmore Bond.Blackmore victim Paul Stevens, who was forced to retire from work due to an auto-immune disease called myasthenia gravis, invested his ill-health retirement benefit into the fund.He has been left devastated by the loss and says it has made his illness worse.”Like many others, we invested a significant amount of money and, as a family, we lost £40,000,” he said. “These schemes must stop and the FCA needs to police them.”His wife, Jane, said: “We feel as if we’ve been turned over twice – first by Blackmore, then by the FCA.”Panorama: The Billion-Pound Savings ScandalEach year, an estimated billion pounds is lost in failed investment schemes. Panorama tells the story of one of them as its member challenge the regulators they believe failed themWatch Now on BBC iPlayer (UK Only)Paul Carlier, a finance and banking expert, first reported his concerns about the marketing of the Blackmore Bond to the FCA in 2017.His office at the time was next door to the company that was tasked with selling the bond. He overheard their activities and reported them for using high-pressure “boiler room” sales tactics, which are banned. “[The sales people] were literally cold-calling people and approaching people with an intent to sell them a toxic or worthless investment product, including the Blackmore Bond,” he told BBC Panorama.Mr Carlier said the office walls were so thin he could hear their pushy techniques, as well as them clapping and high-fiving when they managed to make someone commit to investing. In 2018, he learned that the sales company was still in operation and warned the FCA again, this time escalating the warning to the regulator’s then chief executive, Mr Bailey.”And yet another £10m-plus was invested after he was aware of it, through from the remainder of 2018 and into 2019,” said Mr Carlier. “It’s astonishing. I don’t know what more you could have done. I entrusted them to deal with it, and they didn’t.”Mr Bailey now has a pivotal position managing the national economy, as head of the Bank of England.In total, £30m was invested into the Blackmore fund after the first warning in 2017.When Mr Carlier again complained to the FCA about its lack of action, the regulator sent a draft response to him – he believes by mistake – which contained a sentence apparently admitting the FCA was at fault. The line said: “However, I consider there was a missed opportunity to reconsider and act on the intelligence you provided.” But this line had been crossed through, implying that Mr Carlier wasn’t supposed to see it. He was only able to because someone had left the track-changes feature on, which showed a history of all edits to the documents. “Somebody has sought to conceal that,” he told the BBC. “That is the definition of a cover-up.”The FCA has denied that it attempted to cover up its actions and said the letter to Mr Carlier was changed because “further evidence came to light”.MP Kevin Hollinrake, who sits on the Treasury Sub-Committee on Financial Services Regulations, is among those calling for fundamental reform of the regulator: “I’d like to say this is a one-off case, but the reality is we see the succession of cases like this where the FCA has failed and it has failed here again.”He also criticised Mr Bailey and the FCA for its handling of other failed investment funds, such as London Capital and Finance, which collapsed in 2019, leading to 11,600 investors losing £237m.That failure led to an inquiry by former Court of Appeal Judge, Dame Elizabeth Gloster, and compensation for the victims. The MPs believe the same should happen in the case of Blackmore.Mr Stevens and other Blackmore Bond investors outlined how the fund’s collapse had impacted them in front of MPs and members of the House of Lords at a special meeting in June.Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Susan Kramer said an inquiry was needed “to deliver some justice for the people who, essentially, were scammed in an entirely public and, what should have been, regulated setting”.The BBC Panorama film also follows other Blackmore investors who, believing they had been abandoned by the authorities, set out to uncover evidence relating to Blackmore Bond themselves.The FCA and other authorities have not taken any action against the Blackmore directors, Phillip Nunn and Patrick McCreesh.The FCA has denied it was responsible for the Blackmore investors’ losses. It said it was examining the way the bond’s promotional material was approved, but said investors were warned of the risks and had to confirm they understood them and could afford to lose the money.Andrew Bailey declined to comment to Panorama on his performance at the FCA.Image source, ReutersPhillip Nunn, who has been bankrupted in connection with one Blackmore Bond development, did not reply to any of Panorama’s questions, despite repeated requests.Patrick McCreesh denied any wrongdoing and said the Blackmore Bond was a potentially profitable, properly run business. He said the risks of investing were fully explained, vulnerable people were not targeted and Blackmore had stopped working with the sales company which had been reported to the FCA. Mr McCreesh also admitted some business decisions were not right and apologised. He said he has suffered hardship and insists, as a director, he always acted properly and in the best interests of the business.

Dame Deborah James: Cancer campaigner lived a full life ‘with no regrets’

BBC News

Published11 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThe mother of cancer campaigner Dame Deborah James says her daughter told her she did not want to die in a late-night chat, just days before her death.”The hardest thing was knowing that she was going to die and, as a mother, knowing I couldn’t do anything about it,” Heather James told BBC Breakfast.She said Dame Deborah had lived a full life “with no regrets”, but added: “She did say ‘I don’t want to die’. And that’s the hardest, saddest part.”Dame Deborah died in June, aged 40.In the final weeks of her life, Heather became Dame Deborah’s main carer. The campaigner and host of the BBC’s You, Me and the Big C podcast had been diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2016.Tailored cancer care – Dame Deborah’s fundraising legacyDeborah James ‘taught us how to live and how to die’Deborah James made a dame by William at her homeIn May, Dame Deborah announced she was receiving end-of-life care for bowel cancer and raised millions for cancer research before her death.Heather told BBC Breakfast how her daughter was always full of energy, even as a child. “As a baby I think she came out like that, we never got any sleep at night with her when she was born.”She never had enough hours in the day, even when she was so poorly with cancer, she made the most of it.”The mother of two was given a damehood for her fundraising efforts by the Duke of Cambridge at her parents’ home in Woking, in Surrey, where she had chosen to stay in the final weeks of her life.When Heather was told Prince William was coming to her garden, she says she was shocked and told her family she first needed a new lounge.But she said the duke “put us so much at ease”. “He was just like one of my son-in-laws. He just sat down with us and he was so lovely, I think he is a people’s king.”Image source, Heather JamesAfter her diagnosis, Dame Deborah, a former deputy head teacher, started a cancer blog, before writing for the Sun newspaper and becoming a BBC broadcaster.She launched a new fund, called the Bowelbabe fund, to raise money for research into personalised medicine for cancer patients. It surpassed £1m in less than 24 hours – smashing her initial goal of £250,000 – and has now raised more than £7m.Heather said the last eight weeks of Dame Deborah’s life were probably the “best eight weeks” the family shared together.”Even though she died at the end of it, how can you not love what she did in that eight weeks?” she said, adding that the success of the fund helped the family cope.In the final days of her life, Dame Deborah wrote the final chapter of her second book, How To Live When You Could Be Dead.”That must have been the toughest to write for her, because she knew she only had days left,” Heather said. “She could still have the beautiful ability to write right up to the end.”She said her daughter had asked her to continue and enjoy her own life and to do her justice, adding: “Not just live life, enjoy living life and live it to the best that we can. So I think we owe that to Deborah.”More on this storyCancer campaigner Dame Deborah James dies29 JuneTailored cancer care – Dame Deborah’s fundraising legacy29 JuneDeborah James ‘taught us how to live and how to die’28 June

Dame Deborah James: Cancer campaigner lived a full life ‘with no regrets’

BBC News

Published11 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingThe mother of cancer campaigner Dame Deborah James says her daughter told her she did not want to die in a late-night chat, just days before her death.”The hardest thing was knowing that she was going to die and, as a mother, knowing I couldn’t do anything about it,” Heather James told BBC Breakfast.She said Dame Deborah had lived a full life “with no regrets”, but added: “She did say ‘I don’t want to die’. And that’s the hardest, saddest part.”Dame Deborah died in June, aged 40.In the final weeks of her life, Heather became Dame Deborah’s main carer. The campaigner and host of the BBC’s You, Me and the Big C podcast had been diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2016.Tailored cancer care – Dame Deborah’s fundraising legacyDeborah James ‘taught us how to live and how to die’Deborah James made a dame by William at her homeIn May, Dame Deborah announced she was receiving end-of-life care for bowel cancer and raised millions for cancer research before her death.Heather told BBC Breakfast how her daughter was always full of energy, even as a child. “As a baby I think she came out like that, we never got any sleep at night with her when she was born.”She never had enough hours in the day, even when she was so poorly with cancer, she made the most of it.”The mother of two was given a damehood for her fundraising efforts by the Duke of Cambridge at her parents’ home in Woking, in Surrey, where she had chosen to stay in the final weeks of her life.When Heather was told Prince William was coming to her garden, she says she was shocked and told her family she first needed a new lounge.But she said the duke “put us so much at ease”. “He was just like one of my son-in-laws. He just sat down with us and he was so lovely, I think he is a people’s king.”Image source, Heather JamesAfter her diagnosis, Dame Deborah, a former deputy head teacher, started a cancer blog, before writing for the Sun newspaper and becoming a BBC broadcaster.She launched a new fund, called the Bowelbabe fund, to raise money for research into personalised medicine for cancer patients. It surpassed £1m in less than 24 hours – smashing her initial goal of £250,000 – and has now raised more than £7m.Heather said the last eight weeks of Dame Deborah’s life were probably the “best eight weeks” the family shared together.”Even though she died at the end of it, how can you not love what she did in that eight weeks?” she said, adding that the success of the fund helped the family cope.In the final days of her life, Dame Deborah wrote the final chapter of her second book, How To Live When You Could Be Dead.”That must have been the toughest to write for her, because she knew she only had days left,” Heather said. “She could still have the beautiful ability to write right up to the end.”She said her daughter had asked her to continue and enjoy her own life and to do her justice, adding: “Not just live life, enjoy living life and live it to the best that we can. So I think we owe that to Deborah.”More on this storyCancer campaigner Dame Deborah James dies29 JuneTailored cancer care – Dame Deborah’s fundraising legacy29 JuneDeborah James ‘taught us how to live and how to die’28 June

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