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Weekend burst of exercise can be enough to stay fit

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Published11 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesA big burst of exercise at the weekend is as good as spreading activity out across the week, according to a study.US researchers tracked 350,000 people over 10 years to see how well so-called weekend warriors fared. The findings, in the JAMA Internal Medicine journal, suggest the type and total amount of exercise count, rather than how many sessions.At least 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity exercise is recommended. Going for a brisk walk, a light effort cycle on a bike or playing doubles in tennis would count towards this.Or you could do 75 minutes of vigorous activity – something like running, swimming or playing a game of football – say health experts in guidance published by the NHS. Many of the participants in the US study clocked up this amount in a week. But some crammed it into one or two sessions rather than spacing it out. Those who reached their recommended level of activity, whether during the week or the weekend, had lower a death risk than those who did less than the recommend amount.Image source, Getty ImagesThe NHS also says people should do some form of physical activity everyday including strength exercises and try not to stay seated for extended periods of time.Strength exercises include yoga, pilates and heavy gardening. Very vigorous activity that can help achieve recommended physical activity levels and can be done in shorter, sharper bursts, includes:high-intensity interval trainingspinning classeslifting heavy weights hill sprintingBreathe harderBritish Heart Foundation senior cardiac nurse Joanne Whitmore said: “This large study suggests that, when it comes to exercise, it doesn’t matter when you do it. “The most important thing is that physical activity is undertaken in the first place.”Whether you cram your exercise in on the weekend or spread it across the week, aim for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity activity each week. “Exercise can improve your health, reducing your risk of heart and circulatory diseases like heart attack and stroke.”Moderate-intensity activities make you breathe harder and make your heartbeat faster than usual but you should still be able to have a conversation whilst doing them.”The NHS also recommends:toddlers are active for at least 180 minutes a daychildren and young people are active for about an hour a day More on this storyWeekend exercise ‘warriors’ boost health10 January 2017Could music festivals be good for your health?5 August 2019Related Internet LinksJAMA Internal MedicineThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Oldham doctor jailed for killing patient in botched procedure

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Published4 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ReachA doctor who killed a mother-of-three when he botched a procedure during a routine appointment has been jailed.Dr Isyaka Mamman, now thought to be 85, admitted gross negligence manslaughter over the death of Shahida Parveen, 48, at the Royal Oldham Hospital in 2018.He used the wrong needle and inserted it in the wrong place, piercing the sac holding Mrs Parveen’s heart.Mrs Justice Yip at Manchester Crown Court said Mrs Parveen’s death was his fault and sentenced him to three years.She also criticised the NHS trust, pointing to the fact that Mamman had both lied about his age and had been involved in two critical incidents similar to that which led to Mrs Parveen’s death.The court heard Mrs Parveen attended Royal Oldham Hospital on 3 September, 2018, to give a bone marrow sample.This is usually taken from the hip bone but, after failing in his first attempt, Mamman tried to instead take it from her sternum.This was a “highly dangerous” procedure, the court was told, and one which had led to another of Mamman’s patients being permanently disabled three years earlier.’Excessive force’A formal complaint was made to the hospital in 2015 after a patient complained Mamman had used “excessive force” during a bone marrow biopsy.The unnamed patient was told that Mamman was “in his 70s” and his colleagues thought he should retire but they could not dismiss him purely because of his age.She was assured he would be put on light duties in the future.The court went on to hear that Mrs Parveen lost consciousness as soon as the needle was inserted and pierced her pericardium, also known as the heart sac, causing massive internal bleeding.Her husband ran from the room shouting: “He killed her. I told him to stop three times and he did not listen. He killed her.”Haemotologist Mamman qualified as a doctor in Nigeria and had worked in the UK since 1991.He was employed by Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust from 2004 until Mrs Parveen’s death.Image source, GoogleMamman’s “true age” is a matter of “controversy”, the court heard, since his birthplace in rural Nigeria had no system of birth registration.During his medical training, he said he was born on 16 September, 1936, meaning he was 21 when he began his training as a doctor, qualified in 1965, and was 81 at the time of the fatal incident.But he also told NHS bosses that he had been born in 1941 – suggesting he commenced his medical degree aged 16.And in 2001, when approaching the then compulsory retirement age of 65, he adopted an even later birth date of October 1947 when applying for naturalisation as a British citizen.This would have meant he had been only 10 when he started his medicine degree.’System failings’In 2004 Mamman was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the General Medical Council (GMC) and suspended for 12 months for lying about his age.The Pennine Trust sacked him but then rehired him in 2006 after he had been restored to the register by the GMC, who accepted his date of birth to be 1943. This would suggest he would have been only 14 or 15 when he began his training.Mamman gave no reaction as he was sentenced, but members of his family wept in the public gallery.Mrs Justice Yip said it was “hard to understand” why the previous serious incidents had not led to Mamman’s retirement from medicine, and said there had been “failings in the system”.Dr Chris Brookes, deputy chief executive for the Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust, which now runs the Oldham Royal Hospital, said: “We wish again to offer our sincerest condolences to Mrs Parveen’s family and friends and we are deeply sorry for their loss.”He said the trust had admitted liability in relation to a civil claim brought by the family.Why not follow BBC North West on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? You can also send story ideas to [email protected] on this storyDoctor admits killing patient in botched procedure1 day agoRelated Internet LinksHM Courts ServiceThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Oldham doctor jailed for killing patient in botched procedure

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Published4 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ReachA doctor who killed a mother-of-three when he botched a procedure during a routine appointment has been jailed.Dr Isyaka Mamman, now thought to be 85, admitted gross negligence manslaughter over the death of Shahida Parveen, 48, at the Royal Oldham Hospital in 2018.He used the wrong needle and inserted it in the wrong place, piercing the sac holding Mrs Parveen’s heart.Mrs Justice Yip at Manchester Crown Court said Mrs Parveen’s death was his fault and sentenced him to three years.She also criticised the NHS trust, pointing to the fact that Mamman had both lied about his age and had been involved in two critical incidents similar to that which led to Mrs Parveen’s death.The court heard Mrs Parveen attended Royal Oldham Hospital on 3 September, 2018, to give a bone marrow sample.This is usually taken from the hip bone but, after failing in his first attempt, Mamman tried to instead take it from her sternum.This was a “highly dangerous” procedure, the court was told, and one which had led to another of Mamman’s patients being permanently disabled three years earlier.’Excessive force’A formal complaint was made to the hospital in 2015 after a patient complained Mamman had used “excessive force” during a bone marrow biopsy.The unnamed patient was told that Mamman was “in his 70s” and his colleagues thought he should retire but they could not dismiss him purely because of his age.She was assured he would be put on light duties in the future.The court went on to hear that Mrs Parveen lost consciousness as soon as the needle was inserted and pierced her pericardium, also known as the heart sac, causing massive internal bleeding.Her husband ran from the room shouting: “He killed her. I told him to stop three times and he did not listen. He killed her.”Haemotologist Mamman qualified as a doctor in Nigeria and had worked in the UK since 1991.He was employed by Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust from 2004 until Mrs Parveen’s death.Image source, GoogleMamman’s “true age” is a matter of “controversy”, the court heard, since his birthplace in rural Nigeria had no system of birth registration.During his medical training, he said he was born on 16 September, 1936, meaning he was 21 when he began his training as a doctor, qualified in 1965, and was 81 at the time of the fatal incident.But he also told NHS bosses that he had been born in 1941 – suggesting he commenced his medical degree aged 16.And in 2001, when approaching the then compulsory retirement age of 65, he adopted an even later birth date of October 1947 when applying for naturalisation as a British citizen.This would have meant he had been only 10 when he started his medicine degree.’System failings’In 2004 Mamman was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the General Medical Council (GMC) and suspended for 12 months for lying about his age.The Pennine Trust sacked him but then rehired him in 2006 after he had been restored to the register by the GMC, who accepted his date of birth to be 1943. This would suggest he would have been only 14 or 15 when he began his training.Mamman gave no reaction as he was sentenced, but members of his family wept in the public gallery.Mrs Justice Yip said it was “hard to understand” why the previous serious incidents had not led to Mamman’s retirement from medicine, and said there had been “failings in the system”.Dr Chris Brookes, deputy chief executive for the Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust, which now runs the Oldham Royal Hospital, said: “We wish again to offer our sincerest condolences to Mrs Parveen’s family and friends and we are deeply sorry for their loss.”He said the trust had admitted liability in relation to a civil claim brought by the family.Why not follow BBC North West on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? You can also send story ideas to [email protected] on this storyDoctor admits killing patient in botched procedure1 day agoRelated Internet LinksHM Courts ServiceThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Oldham doctor jailed for killing patient in botched procedure

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Published4 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ReachA doctor who killed a mother-of-three when he botched a procedure during a routine appointment has been jailed.Dr Isyaka Mamman, now thought to be 85, admitted gross negligence manslaughter over the death of Shahida Parveen, 48, at the Royal Oldham Hospital in 2018.He used the wrong needle and inserted it in the wrong place, piercing the sac holding Mrs Parveen’s heart.Mrs Justice Yip at Manchester Crown Court said Mrs Parveen’s death was his fault and sentenced him to three years.She also criticised the NHS trust, pointing to the fact that Mamman had both lied about his age and had been involved in two critical incidents similar to that which led to Mrs Parveen’s death.The court heard Mrs Parveen attended Royal Oldham Hospital on 3 September, 2018, to give a bone marrow sample.This is usually taken from the hip bone but, after failing in his first attempt, Mamman tried to instead take it from her sternum.This was a “highly dangerous” procedure, the court was told, and one which had led to another of Mamman’s patients being permanently disabled three years earlier.’Excessive force’A formal complaint was made to the hospital in 2015 after a patient complained Mamman had used “excessive force” during a bone marrow biopsy.The unnamed patient was told that Mamman was “in his 70s” and his colleagues thought he should retire but they could not dismiss him purely because of his age.She was assured he would be put on light duties in the future.The court went on to hear that Mrs Parveen lost consciousness as soon as the needle was inserted and pierced her pericardium, also known as the heart sac, causing massive internal bleeding.Her husband ran from the room shouting: “He killed her. I told him to stop three times and he did not listen. He killed her.”Haemotologist Mamman qualified as a doctor in Nigeria and had worked in the UK since 1991.He was employed by Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust from 2004 until Mrs Parveen’s death.Image source, GoogleMamman’s “true age” is a matter of “controversy”, the court heard, since his birthplace in rural Nigeria had no system of birth registration.During his medical training, he said he was born on 16 September, 1936, meaning he was 21 when he began his training as a doctor, qualified in 1965, and was 81 at the time of the fatal incident.But he also told NHS bosses that he had been born in 1941 – suggesting he commenced his medical degree aged 16.And in 2001, when approaching the then compulsory retirement age of 65, he adopted an even later birth date of October 1947 when applying for naturalisation as a British citizen.This would have meant he had been only 10 when he started his medicine degree.’System failings’In 2004 Mamman was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the General Medical Council (GMC) and suspended for 12 months for lying about his age.The Pennine Trust sacked him but then rehired him in 2006 after he had been restored to the register by the GMC, who accepted his date of birth to be 1943. This would suggest he would have been only 14 or 15 when he began his training.Mamman gave no reaction as he was sentenced, but members of his family wept in the public gallery.Mrs Justice Yip said it was “hard to understand” why the previous serious incidents had not led to Mamman’s retirement from medicine, and said there had been “failings in the system”.Dr Chris Brookes, deputy chief executive for the Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust, which now runs the Oldham Royal Hospital, said: “We wish again to offer our sincerest condolences to Mrs Parveen’s family and friends and we are deeply sorry for their loss.”He said the trust had admitted liability in relation to a civil claim brought by the family.Why not follow BBC North West on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? You can also send story ideas to [email protected] on this storyDoctor admits killing patient in botched procedure1 day agoRelated Internet LinksHM Courts ServiceThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Covid Wales: All hospitals ask for masks as cases rise

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Published12 minutes agocommentsCommentsSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingAll of Wales’ seven health boards are either insisting or encouraging the use of face masks during hospital visits.Withybush Hospital in Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, has gone further by reinstating a temporary ban on visits.Hywel Dda health board in west and mid Wales is the latest to require use of masks, following a rise in Covid infections.Aneurin Bevan asked people to stay away from its hospitals unless “absolutely necessary” due to “extreme pressure”. The health board did not mention Covid as a reason for this latest appeal.Meanwhile, some year groups at Ysgol Aberconwy, Conwy, are receiving their lessons online from home this week due to staff absences relating to Covid.More catching Covid in hospitalWales has seen a rise in infections in the last month with one in 30 people testing positive, according to the Office of National Statistics (ONS).This is also reflected in a rise in patients testing positive for Covid in hospital – while more are catching it while in hospital.However, the most recent figures still show 88% of patients testing positive for Covid are primarily being treated for something else.Cwm Taf Morgannwg and Aneurin Bevan health boards, both in south Wales, asked people to wear masks at their hospitals last month, as did Betsi Cadwaladr health board which covers the north, and Swansea Bay health board.Image source, GoogleHow many people have been vaccinated in Wales?Waiting times record, with two years of increasesCardiff and Vale health board followed suit.Powys Teaching Health board has required visitors to wear face masks for some time.Aneurin Bevan, which covers Blaenau Gwent, Caerphilly, Monmouthshire, Newport, Torfaen and south Powys, said the emergency department at The Grange University Hospital in Cwmbran “remains very busy” on Monday evening.It asked people to attend only if they have “a life-threatening illness or serious injury”. Anyone with a less serious issue is asked to visit a minor injury unit in Newport, Abergavenny, Ystrad Mynach, or Ebbw Vale.’Reduce the risk’Hywel Dda are now encouraging staff and contractors to have a lateral flow test, and report the result, twice a week. “We have made the decision to reinforce these measures at Withybush Hospital to reduce the risk to our patients and staff,” said Mandy Rayani, director of nursing, quality and patient experience.”We can all continue to take protective measures to reduce the risk of transmission of Covid-19 to protect vulnerable people and the NHS.People are also asked to attend outpatient clinics alone at Withybush.A designated partner can attend antenatal appointments or scans at Withybush Hospital midwifery-led unit and any visits considered necessary through agreement with a ward sister or charge nurse.Monmouth GP Dr Rowena Christmas said Covid was “still very much with us” with six residents at one care home testing positive despite its “best interests to protect everyone”.”We’ve got lots and lots of patients with symptoms which that could well be Covid,” she told Claire Summers on BBC Radio Wales.”We’ve got staff members off sick again, testing positive.”Right now if we could get our masks back on and, I hate to say this, but avoid hugs and kisses with anyone who isn’t our immediate contacts as much as you possibly can.”More on this storyTwo health boards bring back face masks22 JuneHow many people have been vaccinated in Wales?16 hours ago

NHS trials using drones to deliver chemotherapy drugs

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Published10 hours agocommentsCommentsSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ApianDrones are to be used to courier drugs in a bid to speed up the delivery of vital medicines, the NHS has announced.Chemotherapy drugs will be flown from Portsmouth to a hospital on the Isle of Wight as part of a pilot scheme – with the first flight later on Monday.NHS England said it was hoped that the technology would lead to “same-day delivery” of orders across the country.Chief executive Amanda Pritchard said the scheme, which will also be trialled in Northumbria, was “extraordinary”.If successful, it’s believed the trust would be the first in the world to deliver chemotherapy drugs by drone.Announcing it ahead of the 74th anniversary of the founding of the NHS, she said it was “clear that the pace of change and improvement across the health service is only accelerating”.”Delivering chemo by drone is another extraordinary development for cancer patients and shows how the NHS will stop at nothing to ensure people get the treatment they need as promptly as possible – while also cutting costs,” she added.Image source, ApianThe scheme will cut delivery times to the island from four hours to 30 minutes, with one flight replacing two car journeys and one hovercraft or ferry journey per delivery. The drugs will be flown directly from the pharmacy at Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust to St Mary’s Hospital, where staff will collect them before distributing it to hospital teams and patients. An NHS England spokesman said chemotherapy drugs were difficult to transport as some doses have a short shelf life.He added that it was hoped the new delivery method, which has been created in partnership with tech company Apian, would offer a better option for cancer patients living on the Isle of Wight, many of whom currently have to travel to the mainland for treatment. Health Secretary Sajid Javid said he wanted England to “become a world leader in cancer care” and using the drones would mean patients “will have quicker, fairer access to treatment, no matter where they live”.A trial of the drone programme in Northumbria is expected to follow the initial Isle of Wight trial.Follow BBC South on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Send your story ideas to [email protected] on this storyNHS trust to deliver chemotherapy drugs by drone24 September 2021Drones ‘potential solution’ to medicine deliveries29 January 2020

NHS trials using drones to deliver chemotherapy drugs

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Published10 hours agocommentsCommentsSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ApianDrones are to be used to courier drugs in a bid to speed up the delivery of vital medicines, the NHS has announced.Chemotherapy drugs will be flown from Portsmouth to a hospital on the Isle of Wight as part of a pilot scheme – with the first flight later on Monday.NHS England said it was hoped that the technology would lead to “same-day delivery” of orders across the country.Chief executive Amanda Pritchard said the scheme, which will also be trialled in Northumbria, was “extraordinary”.If successful, it’s believed the trust would be the first in the world to deliver chemotherapy drugs by drone.Announcing it ahead of the 74th anniversary of the founding of the NHS, she said it was “clear that the pace of change and improvement across the health service is only accelerating”.”Delivering chemo by drone is another extraordinary development for cancer patients and shows how the NHS will stop at nothing to ensure people get the treatment they need as promptly as possible – while also cutting costs,” she added.Image source, ApianThe scheme will cut delivery times to the island from four hours to 30 minutes, with one flight replacing two car journeys and one hovercraft or ferry journey per delivery. The drugs will be flown directly from the pharmacy at Portsmouth Hospitals University NHS Trust to St Mary’s Hospital, where staff will collect them before distributing it to hospital teams and patients. An NHS England spokesman said chemotherapy drugs were difficult to transport as some doses have a short shelf life.He added that it was hoped the new delivery method, which has been created in partnership with tech company Apian, would offer a better option for cancer patients living on the Isle of Wight, many of whom currently have to travel to the mainland for treatment. Health Secretary Sajid Javid said he wanted England to “become a world leader in cancer care” and using the drones would mean patients “will have quicker, fairer access to treatment, no matter where they live”.A trial of the drone programme in Northumbria is expected to follow the initial Isle of Wight trial.Follow BBC South on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Send your story ideas to [email protected] on this storyNHS trust to deliver chemotherapy drugs by drone24 September 2021Drones ‘potential solution’ to medicine deliveries29 January 2020

Hospices hit by rising costs and falling donations

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Published13 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Havens Hospices/Anna Lukala A combination of rising costs and falling donations is hitting the incomes of UK hospices, a provider has told the BBC.Havens Hospices in Essex said it was making it harder to meet rising demand at its sites in Southend and Benfleet. The average value of one-off donations to the charity has halved since April and its energy, food and staffing costs are soaring, said boss Steve Smith. About 80% of Havens’ income comes from donations, he added. “That’s from people jumping out of aeroplanes, running marathons, holding cake sales and all sorts of other activities,” he said. “But we’re losing supporters at the moment. People are giving less and can’t afford to give regular payments.”Image source, Havens Hospices Mr Smith said the charity expects its energy bills alone to soar by 85% in the next 12 months, from £40,500 to around £75,000.On top of that, matching NHS rates of pay to recruit and retain staff has pushed up its wage bill up by 37% – an additional £2.8m a year. The charity has also seen the cost of food go up, as well as fuel for the vehicles its community teams use.Havens is not the only hospice facing financial uncertainty. Soaring bills damaging people’s health – medicsCost of living adding to GP prescriptions pressureThe charity Hospice UK estimates that hospices across the country will face up to £100m of additional costs this year due to rising inflation and the cost of matching NHS pay.That works out as an extra £500,000 a year for an average hospice.As well as looking at other ways to raise money, Mr Smith said Havens was trying to make savings where it could.”We’ve looked at getting food supplied to us by donations, we use motion sensors to make sure lights aren’t left on, and we’re looking at whether we can move to electric vehicles to reduce our fuel costs,” he said.Havens Hospices needs to raise around £85,000 a week to provide all their services, which are free to those who use them. As well as inpatient care, they offer counselling, creative workshops and complimentary therapies like massage and reiki.Amanda-Jane Freemantle, who has a congenital heart condition, has been going to Fair Havens in Southend for around a year.”The complimentary therapies relax me,” she told the BBC. “I can bring a family member or friend and they can relax with me as well.” “It gives me a purpose to go out,” she added. “I meet people who have an illness like myself and we are able to chat and have fun. And I learn new skills, which is amazing. Without the funding I wouldn’t be able to do all that.”Amanda-Jane is supporting the hospice too, by making pamper packages for the inpatients. Elsewhere, the hospice’s staff are helping lead the fundraising efforts. ‘Tough decisions’Ward manager Pamela Houghton-Clarke plans to run the London Marathon next year alongside two colleagues. “It’s going to be a challenge, none of us are runners!” she said. But she and the team are “very aware” of the hospice’s challenges and keen “to do our bit”.It’s clear that the cost pressures hitting households across the UK could affect how vital hospice services are funded. Mr Smith says Havens is thinking about “different ways of fundraising and diversifying our income”, a process that’s already underway as it looks ahead to the next couple of years. But he acknowledges there could be tough decisions to make. “The risk is we will need to consider what we are offering and what is the most effective use of the income we receive. We will have to prioritise those services essentially for those who need them most.”More on this storySoaring bills damaging people’s health – medics9 JuneCost of living adding to GP prescriptions pressure24 June

Hospices hit by rising costs and falling donations

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Published13 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Havens Hospices/Anna Lukala A combination of rising costs and falling donations is hitting the incomes of UK hospices, a provider has told the BBC.Havens Hospices in Essex said it was making it harder to meet rising demand at its sites in Southend and Benfleet. The average value of one-off donations to the charity has halved since April and its energy, food and staffing costs are soaring, said boss Steve Smith. About 80% of Havens’ income comes from donations, he added. “That’s from people jumping out of aeroplanes, running marathons, holding cake sales and all sorts of other activities,” he said. “But we’re losing supporters at the moment. People are giving less and can’t afford to give regular payments.”Image source, Havens Hospices Mr Smith said the charity expects its energy bills alone to soar by 85% in the next 12 months, from £40,500 to around £75,000.On top of that, matching NHS rates of pay to recruit and retain staff has pushed up its wage bill up by 37% – an additional £2.8m a year. The charity has also seen the cost of food go up, as well as fuel for the vehicles its community teams use.Havens is not the only hospice facing financial uncertainty. Soaring bills damaging people’s health – medicsCost of living adding to GP prescriptions pressureThe charity Hospice UK estimates that hospices across the country will face up to £100m of additional costs this year due to rising inflation and the cost of matching NHS pay.That works out as an extra £500,000 a year for an average hospice.As well as looking at other ways to raise money, Mr Smith said Havens was trying to make savings where it could.”We’ve looked at getting food supplied to us by donations, we use motion sensors to make sure lights aren’t left on, and we’re looking at whether we can move to electric vehicles to reduce our fuel costs,” he said.Havens Hospices needs to raise around £85,000 a week to provide all their services, which are free to those who use them. As well as inpatient care, they offer counselling, creative workshops and complimentary therapies like massage and reiki.Amanda-Jane Freemantle, who has a congenital heart condition, has been going to Fair Havens in Southend for around a year.”The complimentary therapies relax me,” she told the BBC. “I can bring a family member or friend and they can relax with me as well.” “It gives me a purpose to go out,” she added. “I meet people who have an illness like myself and we are able to chat and have fun. And I learn new skills, which is amazing. Without the funding I wouldn’t be able to do all that.”Amanda-Jane is supporting the hospice too, by making pamper packages for the inpatients. Elsewhere, the hospice’s staff are helping lead the fundraising efforts. ‘Tough decisions’Ward manager Pamela Houghton-Clarke plans to run the London Marathon next year alongside two colleagues. “It’s going to be a challenge, none of us are runners!” she said. But she and the team are “very aware” of the hospice’s challenges and keen “to do our bit”.It’s clear that the cost pressures hitting households across the UK could affect how vital hospice services are funded. Mr Smith says Havens is thinking about “different ways of fundraising and diversifying our income”, a process that’s already underway as it looks ahead to the next couple of years. But he acknowledges there could be tough decisions to make. “The risk is we will need to consider what we are offering and what is the most effective use of the income we receive. We will have to prioritise those services essentially for those who need them most.”More on this storySoaring bills damaging people’s health – medics9 JuneCost of living adding to GP prescriptions pressure24 June

Oldham doctor admits killing patient in botched routine procedure

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Published21 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ReachA mother was killed at her hospital appointment by a doctor who botched a routine procedure, a court has heard.Dr Isyaka Mamman, 85, was responsible for a series of critical incidents before the fatal appointment, Manchester Crown Court heard.Mamman, who admitted gross negligence manslaughter, had already been sacked by medical watchdogs for lying about his age but was re-employed by the Royal Oldham Hospital.He is due to be sentenced on Tuesday.Mother-of-three Shahida Parveen, 48, had gone to hospital with her husband for investigations into possible myeloproliferative disorder on 3 September 2018 and a bone marrow biopsy had been advised, Andrew Thomas QC, prosecuting, told the hearing.Normally, bone marrow samples are taken from the hip bone but Mamman, of Cumberland Drive, Royton, Oldham, failed to obtain a sample at the first attempt, he said.Image source, GoogleInstead, he attempted a rare and “highly dangerous” procedure of getting a sample from Ms Parveen’s sternum – despite objections from the patient and her husband, the court heard.Mamman, using the wrong biopsy needle, missed the bone and pierced her pericardium, the sac containing the heart, causing massive internal bleeding.Ms Parveen lost consciousness as soon as the needle was inserted. She died later that day.Mamman qualified as a doctor in Nigeria in 1965 and had worked in the UK since 1991. From 2004 until the time of the fatal incident he was employed by the Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust.But his true age is a matter of “controversy”, the court heard, as his birthplace in rural Nigeria had no system of birth registration.He initially told the NHS he was born in 1941 and later he claimed he was born in 1947, suggesting he started his degree course at 10.In 2004 he was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the General Medical Council and suspended for a year for lying about his age.The trust sacked him but then re-employed him in 2006, after he had been restored to the register by the GMC, who accepted his year of birth as 1943.Mamman had left his previous employment with the Medway Trust because of “poor performance”, and in 2015 a formal complaint was made to the Oldham hospital when a patient complained he used “excessive force” during a bone marrow biopsy.The same year there was another clinical incident involving a bone marrow biopsy and a needle being inserted in the wrong place.The patient survived but has been left permanently disabled.Why not follow BBC North West on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? You can also send story ideas to [email protected] Internet LinksHM Courts ServiceThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Oldham doctor admits killing patient in botched routine procedure

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Published21 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ReachA mother was killed at her hospital appointment by a doctor who botched a routine procedure, a court has heard.Dr Isyaka Mamman, 85, was responsible for a series of critical incidents before the fatal appointment, Manchester Crown Court heard.Mamman, who admitted gross negligence manslaughter, had already been sacked by medical watchdogs for lying about his age but was re-employed by the Royal Oldham Hospital.He is due to be sentenced on Tuesday.Mother-of-three Shahida Parveen, 48, had gone to hospital with her husband for investigations into possible myeloproliferative disorder on 3 September 2018 and a bone marrow biopsy had been advised, Andrew Thomas QC, prosecuting, told the hearing.Normally, bone marrow samples are taken from the hip bone but Mamman, of Cumberland Drive, Royton, Oldham, failed to obtain a sample at the first attempt, he said.Image source, GoogleInstead, he attempted a rare and “highly dangerous” procedure of getting a sample from Ms Parveen’s sternum – despite objections from the patient and her husband, the court heard.Mamman, using the wrong biopsy needle, missed the bone and pierced her pericardium, the sac containing the heart, causing massive internal bleeding.Ms Parveen lost consciousness as soon as the needle was inserted. She died later that day.Mamman qualified as a doctor in Nigeria in 1965 and had worked in the UK since 1991. From 2004 until the time of the fatal incident he was employed by the Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust.But his true age is a matter of “controversy”, the court heard, as his birthplace in rural Nigeria had no system of birth registration.He initially told the NHS he was born in 1941 and later he claimed he was born in 1947, suggesting he started his degree course at 10.In 2004 he was found guilty of serious professional misconduct by the General Medical Council and suspended for a year for lying about his age.The trust sacked him but then re-employed him in 2006, after he had been restored to the register by the GMC, who accepted his year of birth as 1943.Mamman had left his previous employment with the Medway Trust because of “poor performance”, and in 2015 a formal complaint was made to the Oldham hospital when a patient complained he used “excessive force” during a bone marrow biopsy.The same year there was another clinical incident involving a bone marrow biopsy and a needle being inserted in the wrong place.The patient survived but has been left permanently disabled.Why not follow BBC North West on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram? You can also send story ideas to [email protected] Internet LinksHM Courts ServiceThe BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.

Kellogg's loses court case over sugary cereal supermarket offers

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Published23 hours agocommentsCommentsSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesKellogg’s will not be allowed to promote sugary cereals in supermarket special offers, a court has ruled.In-store promotions on food and drink high in fat, salt or sugar will be restricted under new rules for England.Food giant Kellogg’s had taken the government to court arguing the rules did not take into account the nutritional value of added milk.But the Royal Courts of Justice ruled in favour of the government. Kellogg’s said it was “disappointed”.”It makes little sense to us that consumers will be able to buy other products, like donuts and chocolate spreads, on promotion – but not many types of breakfast cereals,” said Kellogg UK managing director, Chris Silcock.The Department of Health and Social Care said it strongly welcomed the judgement as location promotion restrictions were expected to deliver more than £57bn of health benefits. “Together with the volume price restrictions, these changes will protect children up and down the country from products high in saturated fat, sugar or salt,” a spokesperson said.Kellogg’s takes government to court over food rulesFrom October, foods deemed high in fat, sugar or salt will be banned from prime spots such as checkouts, store entrances, aisle ends and their online equivalents. The halt on promotions such as buy-one-get-one-free offers has been delayed by the government for 12 months due to the cost of living crisis.Popular Kellogg’s brands such as Crunchy Nut Corn Flakes and Fruit and Fibre are classified as high sugar in their dry form.But Kellogg’s argued including added milk would change the calculation by reducing the proportion of sugar and salt content relative to the weight of the overall serving. The company said independent market data showed cereals were eaten with milk or yoghurt in 92% of cases. But Judge Mr Justice Linden said Kellogg’s cereals “do not come with instructions for preparation which say that they should be consumed with milk”.Mr Justice Linden said there was “no dispute” that breakfast cereals can be part of a healthy diet.He added, however, that promoting the nutritional benefits of a particular breakfast cereal “does not affect the point that if it contains excess fat, sugar or salt, that feature of the product is adverse to a child’s health”.”Nor does mixing a breakfast cereal which is high in, for example, sugar, with milk alter the fact that it is high in sugar.”His judgement said he found no unfairness to Kellogg’s and the public health case for the new rules was compelling, proportionate and rational.Kellogg’s Mr Silcock said the firm would not appeal against the judgement, but urged the government to rethink the new rules.”By restricting the placement of items in supermarkets, people face less choice and potentially higher prices,” he added.More on this storyKellogg’s takes government to court over food rules27 AprilHow bad is our obesity problem?25 July 2020Junk food TV adverts to be banned before 9pm24 June 2021Sugar reduction in food well below target of 20%7 October 2020