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Jayland Walker: Ohio police release video of deadly suspect chase

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Published10 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ReutersUS police have released video of a chase in Akron, Ohio, which ended in a black man being shot dead, hit more than 60 times by pursuing officers.Police believe Jayland Walker, 25, opened fire first and officers feared for their lives during the night-time traffic stop on 27 June.Mr Walker was not armed when he ran away from his car but police say a pistol was later found inside it.Akron’s mayor urged local people to show patience as protests began.”The video is heart-breaking, it’s hard to take in,” Daniel Horrigan said after the footage was released on Sunday.State Attorney General Dave Yost promised a “complete, fair and expert investigation” by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation while Akron police are holding a separate internal investigation into whether officers violated departmental rules or policies.The eight officers involved in the shooting, seven of whom are white and one of whom is black, have been put on paid administrative leave.A lawyer for Mr Walker’s family said officers had kept firing even after he was on the ground. Derrick Johnson, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, described Mr Walker’s death as “murder. Point blank”.Image source, ReutersJayland Walker’s car was stopped on Monday 27 June at 00:30 for a routine traffic inspection. A shot was heard from the car and a traffic camera captured what appeared to be a muzzle flash, Akron Police Chief Steve Mylett said, quoted by the Associated Press news agency. Police body cameras show a person in a ski mask getting out of the car and running towards a car park, chased by officers for about 10 seconds before they open fire.One officer tried first to use a stun gun but that was unsuccessful, police say.Police Chief Mylett said one still photo seemed to show Mr Walker “going down to his waist area” and another appeared to show him turning toward an officer. A third picture image “captures a forward motion of his arm”, he said.As well as the pistol found with a loaded magazine on a seat in the car, a bullet casing matching the weapon was found nearby, police say.Demonstrators marched peacefully through Akron and gathered in front of the city justice centre after the video was released. Family lawyer Bobby DiCello said police had fired on Mr Walker even when he was on the ground and had handcuffed him before trying to provide first aid.Mr Walker’s family said in a statement to CBS News: “Anger is fine. Anger is understandable. Violence is not. Let’s uphold the dignity of Jayland’s life as we peacefully demand justice for him.”Could rethink of US police traffic stops save lives?Michigan officer accused of Patrick Lyoya’s murder

Sri Lanka energy minister warns petrol stocks about to run dry

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Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesSri Lanka’s energy minister has issued a stark warning over the country’s fuel stocks as it faces its worst economic crisis in more than 70 years.On Sunday, Kanchana Wijesekera said the nation only had enough petrol left for less than a day under regular demand.He also said its next petrol shipment was not due for more than two weeks.Last week, Sri Lanka suspended sales of petrol and diesel for non-essential vehicles as it struggles to pay for imports like fuel, food and medicines.Mr Wijesekera told reporters that the country had 12,774 tonnes of diesel and 4,061 tonnes of petrol left in its reserves.”The next petrol shipment is expected between the 22nd and 23rd [of July],” he added.’Living in my car for two days to buy fuel’What’s behind Sri Lanka’s petrol shortage?A shipment of diesel is expected to arrive at the weekend, however Mr Wijesekera warned that the country does not have enough money to pay for planned fuel and crude oil imports.He said Sri Lanka’s central bank could only supply $125m for fuel purchases, far less than the $587m needed for its scheduled shipments.Mr Wijesekera added that the country owed $800m to seven suppliers for purchases it made earlier this year.It came after Sri Lanka banned sales of fuel for private vehicles until next week.Experts believe it is the first country to take the drastic step of halting sales of petrol to ordinary people since the 1970s oil crisis, when fuel was rationed in the US and Europe.The island nation of 22 million people is facing its worse economic crisis since gaining independence from the UK in 1948 as it lacks enough foreign currency to pay for imports of essential goods.Acute shortages of fuel, food and medicines have helped to push up the cost of living to record highs in the country, where many people rely on motor vehicles for their livelihoods.Last Thursday, an International Monetary Fund team concluded a fresh round of talks with Sri Lanka over a $3bn (£2.5bn) bailout deal.While no agreement has been reached yet, the team said in a statement that it had made “significant progress on defining a macroeconomic and structural policy package”.It added that it had “witnessed some of the hardships currently faced by the Sri Lankan people, especially the poor and vulnerable who are affected disproportionately by the crisis”.The cash-strapped country has also sent officials to the major energy producers Russia and Qatar in a bid to secure cheap oil supplies.You may also be interested in:This video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.More on this story’Living in my car for two days to buy fuel’3 days agoPetrol sales banned in crisis-hit Sri Lanka5 days agoWhat’s behind Sri Lanka’s petrol shortage?5 days agoSri Lanka’s suffering was avoidable – bank boss17 JuneSri Lanka says it needs $5bn for essential goods8 June

Uzbekistan Karakalpakstan: Thousands injured in unrest

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Published36 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, ReutersOfficials in the Uzbek region of Karakalpakstan say thousands of people are being treated in hospital, after being injured during unrest on Friday. The regional health minister said hospitals in the regional capital, Nukus, were full of patients. Clashes broke out with the security forces when protesters took to the streets over plans to withdraw the territory’s right to secede. President Shavkat Mirziyoyev now says the plans will not be carried out.But at a meeting with local deputies on Sunday, he accused what he called malicious forces of trying to destabilise and undermine the situation in the Central Asian state.He accused protest organisers of trying to “seize the buildings of local government bodies” in order to obtain weapons.”Taking advantage of their numerical superiority, these men attacked law enforcement officers, severely beating them and inflicting severe injuries,” he was quoted as saying by AFP news agency.Image source, ReutersUzbekistan has a reputation for being one of the most repressive republics of the former Soviet Union, clamping down on any form of dissent. Karakalpakstan, a mostly desert region near the Aral Sea of just under two million people in a country of 32 million, has autonomous status.Reports say police and the army are patrolling the streets of Nukus, after the state of emergency was declared.An exiled opposition politician, Pulat Ahunov, said people were unable to move around and obtain information because of the state of emergency.Mr Ahunov, who is chairman of the opposition Berlik party, said he feared the potential for the situation to escalate into an ethnic conflict between Uzbeks and Karakalpaks, a minority group with their own language.”There are still rallies going on in many locations,” he told Reuters news agency, speaking from Sweden. “Overall, I think that the situation is starting to stabilise, but there is another kind of danger. There have been facts of ethnic clashes between the Karakalpaks and the Uzbeks.”The situation can totally spin out of control. It will not be about the status of Karakalpakstan, it will be about a conflict between the Karakalpaks and the Uzbeks. It is the most dangerous thing.”According to AFP, videos that appear to show people dead and injured from the unrest have raised fears that the security crackdown took a high death toll.

Republic of Uzbekistan

Capital: Tashkent

Population 32 million

Area 447,400 sq km (172,700 sq miles)

Major languages Uzbek, Russian, Tajik

Major religion Islam

Life expectancy 68 years (men), 74 years (women)

Currency Uzbek som

UN, World Bank

Ukraine war: Australian PM visits Kyiv, pledges more military aid

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Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesAustralian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has pledged more military aid to Ukraine after visiting the war-torn nation’s capital.The prime minister met President Volodymyr Zelensky in Kyiv during a surprise trip on Sunday.He earlier toured the devastated towns of Bucha and Irpin, describing what he saw as a “war crime”.The aid package, worth 100m Australian dollars ($68m; £56m), includes drones and 34 additional armoured vehicles. Mr Albanese also announced sanctions and travel bans on a further 16 Russian ministers and oligarchs and an end to imports of Russian gold.He says he saw first-hand “the devastation and trauma” inflicted on Ukraine on his visit. Thousands of Ukranians have been killed and towns destroyed since the invasion began on February 24.The prime minister lit a candle for civilians buried in a mass grave in Bucha, where Russian forces are accused of committing atrocities.And in Irpin he described what he saw as “devastating”.”Here we have what [is] clearly a residential building,” Mr Albanese said.”Another one just behind it, brutally assaulted. This is a war crime.”Can we say how many people have died in Ukraine?Welsh journalist shares photos of Ukraine horrorsNo quick return to normal for scarred BuchaIn a press conference at the Presidential Palace in Kyiv, Mr Albanese said his country will support Ukraine for “as long as it takes”.The extra aid announced brings total Australian assistance to Ukraine to about $390 million.Australia is also considering reopening its embassy in the country, following the lead of other nations such as the UK and US.Mr Albanese joins a long list of world leaders who have visited Ukraine since the war began.The unannounced visit came after a week-long trip to Europe, where Mr Albanese attended a NATO summit in Madrid and met French President Emmanuel Macron in Paris.You may also be interested in:This video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.More on this storyCan we say how many people have died in Ukraine?2 days agoUkraine confirms Lysychansk captured by Russians4 hours agoWelsh journalist shares photos of Ukraine horrors10 hours ago

Kenya's cost-of-living crisis: 'I can't afford rice for my children'

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Published9 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingSome families in Kenya are eating just once a day, or not at all, because of rising food prices, writes the BBC’s Catherine Byaruhanga in Nairobi.Early in the morning, I find Florence Kambua hunched over, digging through the dump site outside her front door to collect plastic, glass, clothes – anything she can sell in Kenya’s capital. The 40-year-old is dressed in a black sweater and knee-high plastic boots. Her job is not for the faint-hearted. It is hazardous too. Rotting food and filled nappies squelch under her feet in the Mukuru Kwa Njenga slum. “Sometimes you end up with diarrhoea, sometimes you get a chest infection. I have persevered, because I don’t have an alternative,” Ms Kambua tells me. The mother of six has fallen on hard times. She first moved to Nairobi, East Africa’s biggest metropolis, 19 years ago hoping for a bright future. In that time, she lost a job, the father of her children left her and the small food stall she set up was demolished for a new expressway that cuts across the city. So what she is doing now is the only option she has to put food on the table. She makes around 100 Kenyan shillings a day ($0.85; £0.70). Even with such meagre earnings Ms Kambua says she could still manage to feed her family twice a day before food prices went up. “My children love rice, I would go with 50 shillings [to the shop] and get half a kilo of rice and cook for them. Now, you cannot.” Image source, Getty ImagesMs Kambua has turned to a well-known staple, maize flour, a cereal that’s often cooked into a thick dough called Ugali that can fill you up but even its price has gone up. So now she feeds her family once a day, sometimes not at all. “I used to buy the cheapest flour at 85 shillings. Right now, flour is 150 shillings. When I am not able to make money, we sleep hungry.” A couple of weeks since we met, there is more bad news for Ms Kambua, the average price for two kilogrammes of maize flour is now above 200 shillings, a 25% increase. The latest data from the Kenya Bureau of Statistics shows annual food inflation is in double digits with prices 12.4% higher in May 2022 than they were in May 2021. Maize, which is grown in Kenya and also imported from neighbouring countries, is consumed by most households. It is a cheaper option during lean times, but Kennedy Nyagah, chairman of the United Grain Millers Association, says there is now a shortage.”I would attribute it to a crop failure because of inadequate rainfall and issues around prices of farm inputs like fertilizers,” he adds.At Ms Kambua’s local market, business is low. In my two visits there it was not unusual to see customers buy a single onion or tomato because they have become too expensive. “Previously, a tomato which you see us selling now for 10 shillings, we would sell it for 5 shillings,” vendor Elijah Machuki Nyabutohe tells me, pointing at a basket. “That is why there are no buyers. They are scared because when they buy a lot of tomatoes, they will not have any money to buy flour and they end up sleeping hungry,” he tells me.Image source, Getty ImagesEven though he is far away from Ukraine, he is acutely aware of the impact the war there and how it has driven up the cost of fuel and fertiliser. “Farmers [are] having to spend more to purchase fertilizers for growing tomatoes. Many end up stopping tomato farming, because of the high cost of the fertilizers and the tomato seeds,” Mr Nyabutohe tells me.A few hundred metres away from the market lives Catherine Kanini – she is unemployed after the bar she worked in was demolished to make way for the expansion of a road joining onto the expressway. The 30-year-old mother can’t afford to rent a house, so she’s built herself a makeshift structure out of mosquito nets, sheets of plastic and wooden poles. She came here from Kitui County in eastern Kenya and like many people on low incomes in urban areas she relies on relatives back home for support when prices are high. Her mother would send her food from the village, but prolonged drought means that’s not an option. “Right now, it is very dry back in our rural area. There is no rain. When it rains is when there is food and that is when my mother can send some food,” Ms Kanini tells me. “Now she is expecting us to send her something. She is relying on us, yet we have problems on this end.” The rising cost of living comes at a time when Kenya is set to hold a general election on 9 August. The issue is featuring prominently on the campaign trail of the two main candidates vying to succeed President Uhuru Kenyatta. Deputy President William Ruto is talking of a “bottoms-up” approach to improve the economy while long-time opposition leader Raila Odinga has promised cash transfers to poor households. Ms Kanini has her own advice for them. “I would suggest that they open factories and they give us work. They should reduce the prices of commodities whose prices they had increased. So that when you are able to make a bit of money you would be able to go and get some food.”International Crisis Group analyst Meron Elias warns that the cost-of-living crisis could cause instability, especially in a close contest. “Although the outcome of the election is uncertain – a credit to Kenya’s democracy – we fear that frustration around high food prices and general inflation make it easier for politicians to mobilise frustrated crowds in the streets. It also creates the risk that unemployed youth could be recruited into gangs to commit violence during the electoral period.” The woman rallying election crowds – but won’t voteRaila Odinga: The eternal candidate hoping it will be fifth-time luckyWilliam Ruto: The former chicken seller with presidential ambitionsKenya’s first intersex political candidateObama endorsement and other false Kenya election claimsAround the BBCAfrica Today podcasts

Bihar: Their son vanished – then an imposter took over for 41 years

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Published28 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Ronny senA court in India has sent to prison a man who was found guilty of posing as the son of a wealthy landlord for 41 years. The BBC’s Soutik Biswas pieces together a gripping tale of deceit and delay in justice. In February 1977, a teenage boy disappeared on his way home from school in the eastern state of Bihar.Kanhaiya Singh, the only son of an affluent and influential zamindar (landlord) in Nalanda district, was returning from a second day of exams. His family lodged a “missing person report” with the police.Efforts to find Kanhaiya came to a naught. His ageing father slid into depression and began visiting quacks. A village shaman told him his son was alive and would “appear” soon. In September 1981, a man in his early 20s arrived in a village, barely 15km (9 miles) from where Kanhaiya lived. He was dressed in saffron and said he sang songs and begged for a living. He told the locals that he was the “son of a prominent person” of Murgawan, the missing boy’s village. What happened next is not entirely clear. But what is known is that when rumours that his missing son had returned reached Kameshwar Singh, he travelled to the village to see for himself. Some of his neighbours who had accompanied Singh told him that the man was indeed his son and he took him home.”My eyes are failing and I can’t see him properly. If you say he is my son, I will keep him,” Singh told the men, according to police records. Image source, Ronny senFour days later, news of her son’s return reached Singh’s wife, Ramsakhi Devi, who was visiting the state capital, Patna, with her daughter, Vidya. She rushed back to the village and, on arrival, realised that the man was not her son.Kanhaiya, she said, had a “cut mark on the left side of his head”, which was missing in this man. He also failed to recognise a teacher from the boy’s school. But Singh was convinced that the man was their son. Days after the incident, Ramsakhi Devi filed a case of impersonation and the man was arrested briefly and spent a month in jail before securing bail.What happened over the next four decades is a chilling tale of deception in which a man pretended to be the missing son of the landlord and inveigled himself into his house.Even as he was on bail, he assumed a new identity, went to college, got married, raised a family and secured multiple fake identities. Using these IDs, he voted, paid taxes, gave biometrics for a national identity card, got a gun licence and sold 37 acres of Singh’s property. He steadfastly refused to provide a DNA sample to match with the landlord’s daughter to prove that they were siblings. And in a move that stunned the court, he even tried to “kill” his original identity with a fake death certificate. The imposter’s tale is a grim commentary on official incompetence and India’s snail-paced judiciary: nearly 50 million cases are pending in the country’s courts and more than 180,000 of them have been pending for more than 30 years. In official records, the man is curiously registered as Kanhaiya Ji – an Indian honorific. A first and second name is a universally accepted form of identification. Except, according to the judges who found the man guilty of impersonation, cheating and conspiracy and sent him to prison for seven years, his real name was Dayanand Gosain, who hailed from a village in Jamui district, some 100km (62 miles) away from his “adopted” home.Image source, Ronny senA black-and-white photograph of Dayanand Gosain from his wedding in 1982 – a year after he entered the Singh household – shows a fair man with a thin moustache. He is wearing a flimsy decorative veil and staring into the distance.Much of the facts about him before he entered the Singh household are fuzzy. His official documents have different dates of birth – it’s January 1966 in his high school records, February 1960 in his national identity card and 1965 in his voter identity card. A 2009 local government card for accessing food rations listed his age as 45 years, which would mean he was born in 1964. Gosain’s family said he was “about 62”, which would tally with his birth date in the national card. What investigators could confirm was that Gosain was the youngest of four sons of a farmer in Jamui, that he sang and begged for a living and that he left his home in 1981. Chittaranjan Kumar, a senior police officer in Jamui, says Gosain married early, but his wife left him soon after. “The couple didn’t have children and his first wife remarried and settled down,” says Mr Kumar. He also tracked down a man in the village who had identified Gosain in the court during the case. “It was fairly well known in his native village that Gosain was living with a landlord’s family in Nalanda,” Judge Manvendra Mishra wrote in his verdict.Image source, Ronny senSingh got Gosain married off to a woman of his own landowning caste a year after taking him home. According to a document available with the family, Gosain pursued a bachelor’s degree in English, politics and philosophy at a local college, which found his conduct “satisfactory”. Over the years, Gosain had two sons and three daughters. After Singh’s death, he inherited half of a nearly century-old, two-storey mansion in Murgawan. (The other half partitioned by a low wall belongs to another branch of Singh’s family.)Overlooking a large water tank, ringed by mango and guava trees, and secured by an unpainted iron gate and brick walls, the house has a decaying air about it. With three generations living under its roof, the 16-room house would have once thrummed with life. Now there’s an eerie quietness about the place. The courtyard is unkempt, and a rotting wheat hulling machine lies in a corner.Gosain’s elder son Gautam Kumar said his father generally stayed at home and managed some 30 acres of farm land. The land yielded rice, wheat and pulses, and was mostly farmed by contract workers. Image source, Ronny senMr Kumar said the family had never discussed the “impersonation case” with his father. “He is our father. If my grandfather had accepted him as his son, who are we to question him? How can you not trust your father?” he asked.”Now after all these years, our lives and identities are hanging in balance because my father’s identity has been taken away. We live in so much anxiety.”In court, Gosain was asked by Judge Mishra where had lived and with whom during the four years he went missing.Gosain was evasive in his replies. He told the judge that he had stayed with a holy man in his ashram in Gorakhpur, a city in the neighbouring state of Uttar Pradesh. But he could not provide any witnesses to back up his claim. Gosain also told the judges that he had never claimed to be the landlord’s lost son. He said Singh only “accepted me as his son and took me home”.”I did not deceive anyone by impersonation. I am Kanhaiya,” he said.In his only existing photograph – a black and white studio mugshot, mutilated by stapler pins in court papers – Kanhaiya Singh, with his neatly parted hair and wearing a light-colour shirt, peers into the camera. The irony is that Kanhaiya, who was 16 when he vanished, has been all but forgotten in Murgawan, a sleepy village of around 1,500 mostly upper-caste Hindus some 100km away from Patna.Gopal Singh, a senior Supreme Court lawyer and a relative, remembers Kanhaiya as a “timid, shy and amiable” boy. “We grew up together, we used to play together. When he disappeared, there was a hue and cry,” he said. “And when the man appeared four years later, he didn’t resemble Kanhaiya at all. But his father was insistent that he was his lost son. So what could we do?”Kameshwar Singh, who died in 1991, was an influential landlord, owning, by one estimate, more than 60 acres of land. He was an elected village council leader for close to four decades and counted Supreme Court lawyers and a member of parliament among his close relatives. Singh had seven daughters and a son (Kanhaiya) from two marriages – the boy was the youngest and, by all accounts, his favourite child and natural heir. Interestingly, the ailing landlord never went to the court and defended Gosain.”I had told the villagers,” Singh told the police, “that if we find this man is not my son, we will return him.”The case was heard over four decades by at least a dozen judges. Finally, a trial court held the hearings without a break for 44 days beginning in February and gave its verdict in early April. Judge Mishra found Gosain guilty. In June, a higher court upheld the order and imposed seven years of “rigorous imprisonment” on Gosain. The court found all the seven defence witnesses unreliable. “We never took this case seriously. We should have gathered our evidence better. We never thought there was any doubt about my father’s identity,” said Gautam Kumar.The drama in the court climaxed with the defence producing a death certificate, declaring Dayanand Gosain was dead.But the certificate was riddled with inconsistences. It was dated May 2014, but said that Gosain had died in January 1982. Police officer Chittaranjan Kumar says when he checked local records, he found no record of Gosain’s death. Local officials told him the certificate was “obviously fake”. Mr Kumar said: “It is very easy get forged documents here.”The court asked the defence why a death certificate was made 32 years after the death of the person and dismissed it as a forgery.”To prove himself as Kanhaiya, Gosain killed himself,” said Judge Mishra.The clinching evidence against Gosain was his refusal to give a DNA sample, which the prosecution first sought in 2014. For eight years, he stonewalled and only this February, gave a written statement refusing to give his sample.”No other evidence is now needed,” the court said. “The accused knows that a DNA test would expose his false claim.””The burden of proof lies on the accused to prove his identity,” the judge added.Image source, VISHAL ANANDGosain’s conviction could be the tip of the proverbial iceberg, lawyers say. The court believed there was a wider conspiracy involving several people of Murgawan who had helped “plant” Gosain into Singh’s family as his lost son. The judge suspected that these people could have bought land owned by Singh and later sold by Gosain as his natural heir. Both the claims have yet to be investigated. “There was a huge conspiracy hatched against my family [to grab] our property, taking advantage of my husband’s ill health and failing eyesight,” Ramsakhi Devi, who died in 1995, told the court. There are still many unanswered questions in this story of deception and duplicity. What happens to the land sold by Singh using a fake identity? Will the plots be taken back from the buyers and distributed among his surviving daughters who are the natural heirs? How will Gosain’s fake identities be dealt with? And most importantly, where is Kanhaiya?Under Indian laws, a person missing for more than seven years is assumed dead. Why has the police not closed the case? Is he alive?Read more by Soutik Biswas The Indian ‘germ murder’ that gripped the worldWhen a cobra became a murder weapon in IndiaFive murders, six men and 16 years of stolen livesA kidnapped girl, a skeleton and a house of memoriesWho sent the wedding gift bomb that killed this newlywed?A wedding bomb, a letter and an unlikely suspect

Video captures moment glacier collapses in Italian alps

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Video has captured the moment an ice mass collapsed down the slopes of Marmolada, in the northern Italian Alps.At least five people have been killed after being caught in an avalanche sparked by the collapse of a glacier in the area’s highest mountain.Emergency officials said eight others were injured in the collapse, with two people suffering serious injuries.At least five killed in Italian glacier collapse

Video captures moment glacier collapses in Italian alps

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Video has captured the moment an ice mass collapsed down the slopes of Marmolada, in the northern Italian Alps.At least five people have been killed after being caught in an avalanche sparked by the collapse of a glacier in the area’s highest mountain.Emergency officials said eight others were injured in the collapse, with two people suffering serious injuries.At least five killed in Italian glacier collapse

Copenhagen shooting: Panic as people flee gunfire inside shopping centre

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Footage shared on social media showed people fleeing in panic as gunfire echoed through a Copenhagen mall. Police have confirmed that several people were killed at the Field’s shopping centre in the south of the city.A 22-year-old Danish man has been arrested in connection with the attack.Copenhagen’s police chief said he could not rule out the attack being an act of terrorism.Read more about this developing story here.

Russian scientist Kolker held in spy probe dies of cancer

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Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Dmitry KolkerA terminally ill Russian physicist who was arrested in Siberia on suspicion of treason has died in custody after being flown to Moscow.Federal Security Service (FSB) officers took Dmitry Kolker, 54, from his hospital bed in Novosibirsk on 30 June. He had pancreatic cancer.On Sunday his son Maxim reported his death, criticising Russian prosecutors and “the state machine” over the case.The quantum and laser specialist was suspected of spying for China.On 30 June a Novosibirsk court had ordered that he be detained for two months. He was taken to Moscow’s Lefortovo prison and died later in a nearby hospital.He had recently read lectures to Chinese students, with an FSB agent ever present by his side.”These charges are absolutely ridiculous and extremely cruel and unusual to be levied on such a sick man,” his cousin Anton Dianov told Reuters news agency. “They knew that he was on his deathbed and they chose to arrest him.”More on this storyJournalists in shock as Russia hunts enemy within12 July 2020Russian space official charged in treason probe7 July 2020

Several hurt in Copenhagen shopping mall shooting

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Published14 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, EPASeveral people have been shot in a shopping centre in the Danish capital Copenhagen, police say.Armed officers were sent to the Field’s mall, in the south of the city. It is not clear how many people may have been killed or wounded.All roads there and the metro line linking it to the city centre have been closed, and ambulance and fire crews are at the scene. Police later said one suspect had been arrested, but gave no details. Eyewitness Emilie Jeppesen told Jyllands-Posten newspaper: “You didn’t know what was happening. Suddenly there was just chaos everywhere.”Image source, EPA

Ukraine confirms Russia captured eastern city Lysychansk

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Published19 minutes agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, AFPUkraine’s military has confirmed that the eastern city of Lysychansk has fallen to Russian forces.”After heavy fighting for Lysychansk, the defence forces of Ukraine were forced to withdraw from their occupied positions and lines,” the army general staff said.Earlier Russia’s Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu said his forces had captured Lysychansk and taken full control of Luhansk region.Ukraine’s troops were outgunned there.Its general staff said that “in order to preserve the lives of Ukrainian defenders, a decision was made to withdraw”.It said the Russians had multiple advantages in artillery, aircraft, manpower and other forces.Earlier, the head of Russia’s Chechen Republic, Ramzan Kadyrov, published video apparently showing Chechen fighters in the centre of Lysychansk.Further west, the Ukrainian-held city of Slovyansk came under heavy shelling, with at least six people killed.It is in Donetsk region, which with Luhansk forms the industrial Donbas.Just before he launched the war, President Vladimir Putin recognised all of Luhansk and Donetsk as independent of Ukraine. Russian proxy forces began an insurgency there in 2014.Just over a week ago Russian troops captured Severodonetsk, a city reduced to ruins by weeks of Russian bombardment. Lysychansk overlooks Severodonetsk, across the Seversky Donets river. There was some hope that, built on high ground, it would provide a natural strong defence. But the noose around the city had tightened, with Russian forces controlling most access in and out. Some Ukrainian units had already pulled back to the next lines of defence over the past week.Ukrainian officials had been unusually quiet on Sunday about the fighting in the city. That might, in part, be explained by “operational security” reasons. They would not want to broadcast any tactical retreat. But losing Lysychansk will be seen as another setback in the east.The fall of Lysychansk is by no means the end of the fighting in Donbas. Ukraine still controls large urban areas in neighbouring Donetsk. Their forces have been preparing new defensive lines between Bakhmut and Slovyansk – though they too are now under heavy Russian shelling. Both sides have been taking heavy casualties. The question now is whether Ukraine can halt the advance, and whether Russia can maintain the momentum.What weapons are being supplied to Ukraine?Slovyansk and Kramatorsk are the two biggest cities in the Donetsk region still in Ukrainian hands.The heavy Russian bombardment of Slovyansk on Sunday caused some 15 fires, Mayor Vadym Lyakh said, and video showed huge plumes of smoke rising over the city. He said it was the worst shelling there in recent time.A video clip on Twitter showed big blasts from a distance – in Slovyansk, according to the caption. It was posted by Iuliia Mendel, ex-spokesperson for President Volodymyr Zelensky. The BBC was unable to verify the latest conditions in Slovyansk.In other developments:Russia accused Ukraine of deliberately targeting civilians with a missile strike on Belgorod, a Russian city 40km (25 miles) from Ukraine’s northern border. The local governor said four people were killed and Russia’s defence ministry said three Ukrainian Tochka-U missiles had been shot down, but debris had fallen on an apartment block. Ukrainian officials dismissed the Russian claim, saying Moscow had staged a “provocation” in the city.Ukraine’s ambassador to Turkey said local customs officials had seized a Russian cargo ship carrying Ukrainian grain. Earlier, Ukraine’s prosecutor-general asked Turkey to detain the Zhibek Zholy, anchored off a port east of Istanbul. War in Ukraine: More coverageSTOLEN GRAIN: Tracking where Russia takes Ukraine’s grainANALYSIS: Why Russia couldn’t hold Snake IslandFACT CHECKED: Russia’s claims about shopping centre attackREAD MORE: Full coverage of the crisisMore on this storyIn maps: Battles raging in east Ukraine6 days ago