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Fumi Fujisaki

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  • Fumi Fujisaki

Senior Lecturer in Architecture

The Manchester School of Architecture is ranked 7th in the QS world university rankings and enjoys the unique context of being a collaboration between Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Manchester. It is one of the largest Schools of Architecture in the country with over 1000 students (typically representing some 85 countries) and over 150 staff from diverse backgrounds and is proud to retain both its quality and sense of community despite its size. The School is characterised by excellence, ambition, boldness, inquisitiveness, innovation, and social responsibility. These facets generate a unique blend and balance between research led teaching, impressive and relevant research outputs (84% of research activity is world leading or internationally excellent), and extensive professional industry links, all of which encourage our students to cultivate their own unique approach to architecture and their careers thereafter. Imagination, we take it seriously! Joining the Manchester School of Architecture as a Senior Lecturer in Architecture you will have an exciting, multi-faceted role which includes an element of leadership within one of our eight vertical ateliers. The research led atelier system focuses on particular agendas and areas of staff expertise. Each atelier supports students from the final year of the BA (Hons) Architecture programme and both years of our M.Arch Architecture in a vertical alignment that enables the sharing of knowledge and significant peer-to-peer learning. The role will also include teaching design studio in either the first or second year of our BA programme. The balance of your working week will be allocated to academic administration relating to your teaching roles and scholarly activity connected to the School's Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) activities. This specific role is to work within the Continuity in Architecture atelier which runs programmes for the design of new buildings and public spaces within the existing urban environment. The emphasis is on the importance of place and the idea that the design of architecture can be influenced by the experience and analysis of particular situations, a strategy that establishes an explicit relationship with environment, circumstances and history, not just with the building site and its immediate surroundings, but also with the climate, topography, geology, culture of the society that initially used the place and also those that will occupy it now Informal discussions can be held with Atelier Senior Lecturer John Lee via [email protected] Manchester Metropolitan University is committed to supporting the rights, responsibilities, dignity, health and wellbeing of staff and students through our commitment to equality, diversity and inclusion. We promote applications from all sections of the community, irrespective of background, belief or identity, recognising the benefits that a diverse organisation can bring. We particularly encourage applications from Black and Minority Ethnic candidates, who we recognise are underrepresented in this area. We recognise the benefits and importance of an environment that supports flexible working and are open to conversations about this throughout the application process.

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Senior Lecturer in Architecture

The Manchester School of Architecture is ranked 7th in the QS world university rankings and enjoys the unique context of being a collaboration between Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Manchester. It is one of the largest Schools of Architecture in the country with over 1000 students (typically representing some 85 countries) and over 150 staff from diverse backgrounds and is proud to retain both its quality and sense of community despite its size. The School is characterised by excellence, ambition, boldness, inquisitiveness, innovation, and social responsibility. These facets generate a unique blend and balance between research led teaching, impressive and relevant research outputs (84% of research activity is world leading or internationally excellent), and extensive professional industry links, all of which encourage our students to cultivate their own unique approach to architecture and their careers thereafter. Imagination, we take it seriously! Joining the Manchester School of Architecture as a Senior Lecturer in Architecture you will have an exciting, multi-faceted role which includes an element of leadership within one of our eight vertical ateliers. The research led atelier system focuses on particular agendas and areas of staff expertise. Each atelier supports students from the final year of the BA (Hons) Architecture programme and both years of our M.Arch Architecture in a vertical alignment that enables the sharing of knowledge and significant peer-to-peer learning. The role will also include teaching design studio in either the first or second year of our BA programme. The balance of your working week will be allocated to academic administration relating to your teaching roles and scholarly activity connected to the School's Research and Knowledge Exchange (RKE) activities. This specific role is to work within the Continuity in Architecture atelier which runs programmes for the design of new buildings and public spaces within the existing urban environment. The emphasis is on the importance of place and the idea that the design of architecture can be influenced by the experience and analysis of particular situations, a strategy that establishes an explicit relationship with environment, circumstances and history, not just with the building site and its immediate surroundings, but also with the climate, topography, geology, culture of the society that initially used the place and also those that will occupy it now Informal discussions can be held with Atelier Senior Lecturer John Lee via [email protected] Manchester Metropolitan University is committed to supporting the rights, responsibilities, dignity, health and wellbeing of staff and students through our commitment to equality, diversity and inclusion. We promote applications from all sections of the community, irrespective of background, belief or identity, recognising the benefits that a diverse organisation can bring. We particularly encourage applications from Black and Minority Ethnic candidates, who we recognise are underrepresented in this area. We recognise the benefits and importance of an environment that supports flexible working and are open to conversations about this throughout the application process.

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Dean and Head of School, Architecture and the Environment

R04648 - Candidate Pack - Dean and Head of School for Architecture and the Environment.pdf UWE Bristol has an academic structure, based around three newly created colleges.  Within each college, academic disciplines are clustered together in schools ensuring academic excellence through teaching and learning, research and enterprise and student experience.  Each new college is led by a Pro Vice-Chancellor Head of College and each new school will be led by a Dean and Head of School.  There are 4 schools within the College of Arts, Technology and Environment which are the School of Architecture and Environment, the School of Engineering, the School of Computing and Creative Technologies and the School of Art, Design, Culture and Media and the college has over 14,000 students and 750 staff in total.  The Dean and Head of School is a key leadership and management role, shaping strategy for the new school and ensuring its success and financial viability.  You will be expected to provide effective and values led leadership and to work across the other schools to ensure strategic and organisational alignment. You will have experience of achievement and effectiveness as a visionary with emotional intelligence and a passion for innovation & change, creativity and collaboration across teaching, research and enterprise.  As a member of the College executive team, you will have responsibility for the development and delivery of the School strategy plan. You will monitor its effectiveness to maximise the school overall performance and develop an ambitious and inclusive culture of success which will be aligned to the University’s ambitions and values. You will lead the School but you will also be asked to work collaboratively across Schools and Colleges to capitalise on interdisciplinary opportunities. You will represent the University at key external networks, developing, promoting and showcasing the profile and reputation of the School, College and the University at local, regional, national and international levels. Whilst this role is based within the College, you will be expected to take a University-wide perspective, aligned to UWE Bristol values. Through collaboration you will play a significant role in the implementation of strategic plans which will be informed by College and/or Research Centre (s) the School requirements but will ultimately be determined by University objectives. You will have a substantial record of achievement as an academic leader in a relevant subject area and commensurate with a professorial level appointment.  You will have experience of and expertise in strategic planning including the management of financial and other resources with proven ability to deliver on a range of internal and external KPI’s.  If this role sounds perfect for you and you are looking to join a diverse and dynamic organisation where you can make a real difference, we would really like to hear from you.There will be a two stage selection process with the first stage scheduled to take place on 29th September 2022. The second stage is scheduled to take place on 6th October 2022. For further information and an informal conversation about the role please contact:Professor Elena Marco, Pro-Vice Chancellor and Head of College of Arts, Technology and Environment [email protected] 

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Infected blood victims to get £100,000 compensation

Published1 hour agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, Getty ImagesMore than 4,000 UK victims of the infected blood scandal are to receive interim compensation of £100,000 each, the government has announced.It will be given to those whose health is failing after developing blood-borne viruses like hepatitis and HIV as well as partners of people who have died.It is the first time compensation will be paid after decades of campaigning.Families welcomed the news but said there were many people, like bereaved parents, who would miss out.The payments will be made by the end of October for those in England. Those living in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will also receive the money.It comes after the chair of the public inquiry, Sir Brian Langstaff, said there was a compelling case to make payments quickly - and victims were on borrowed time because of failing health.Currently, victims and families get financial support payments - and for some these will have run into tens of thousands of pounds.But this is the first time the government has agreed to a compensation payment for things such as loss of earnings, care costs and other lifetime losses. The government said the compensation would be tax-free and not affect the support payments these people are receiving. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said: "While nothing can make up for the pain and suffering endured by those affected by this tragic injustice, we are taking action to do right by victims and those who have lost their partners."This could be just the first stage of compensation payments as the inquiry is looking into whether more payouts should be paid to a greater number of people.Why the NHS gave thousands HIV-contaminated bloodThe woman who lost two husbands to the scandalThe secret in my blood'NHS's worst-ever treatment disaster'The contaminated blood scandal has been called the worst treatment disaster in the history of the NHS.Thousands of NHS patients with haemophilia and other blood disorders became seriously ill after being given a new treatment called factor VIII or IX from the mid-1970s onwards.At the time the medication was imported from the US where it was made from the pooled blood plasma of thousands of paid donors, including some in high-risk groups, such as prisoners.If a single donor was infected with a blood-borne virus such as hepatitis or HIV then the whole batch of medication could be contaminated.Image source, Factor VIII/Marc marnieAn unknown number of UK patients were also exposed to hepatitis B or C though a blood transfusion after childbirth or hospital surgery. At least 2,400 people died after contracting HIV or hepatitis C through NHS treatments in the 1970s and 80s.A 'significant development'Over the years, the government has put in place a number of schemes offering victims financial support without any admission of liability but, unlike in the Republic of Ireland and some other countries, compensation has never been paid to individuals or families affected.In July public inquiry chairman Sir Brian said individuals who currently qualify for financial support, including some bereaved partners of those killed, should now be offered interim compensation of £100,000 each.Final recommendations on compensation for a wider group of people are expected when the inquiry concludes next year.This video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.An independent study commissioned by the government, published last month, said victims should eventually be compensated for physical and social injury, the stigma of the disease, the impact on family and work life, and the cost of care. It recommended that partners, children, siblings and parents of those who had been infected should be eligible for payments too.If the inquiry and the government accept those proposals completely then it is possible the final bill could be more than £1bn.The recipients of the interim compensation payments are people who are already registered for financial support payments, but campaigners say there could be tens of thousands of others who have not yet come forward.Kate Burt, chief executive of the Haemophilia Society, said: 'Finally, after nearly five decades the government has accepted it must pay compensation to those infected as a result of the contaminated blood scandal. "This is a significant development. However, the majority of the bereaved - including parents and the children of those who died - will receive nothing. "Steps must be taken now to set up a workable scheme which can deliver full compensation quickly and fairly to all those who suffered devastating loss because of this NHS treatment disaster.'More on this storyClarke defends flawed blood products advice28 July 2021Parents and pupils kept in dark at infected blood school26 June 2021Why the NHS gave thousands HIV-contaminated blood27 July 2021

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The Papers: ‘Cyclists may need number plates’, and Darius dies

Published2 hours agoSharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, BBC SportImage source, AFPImage source, BBC

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