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Month: May 2022

Sky News world

Ukraine reports 15,000 suspected war crimes – Russian ministers and propagandists among those accused

More than 15,000 suspected war crimes have been reported in Ukraine since the beginning of the Russian invasion, the country's chief prosecutor has said.Iryna Venediktova said more than 500 suspects have been identified, which include Russian ministers, military commanders and propagandists. Prosecutions have begun against about 80 of them.Ukraine war latest - fierce battle for key city as Russia pursues its biggest victory of invasion so far Image: Iryna Venediktova said more than 500 suspects have been identified Ms Venediktova told a news conference in The Hague that "about 200-300 war crimes are committed every day". Advertisement A few thousand alleged war crimes have been reported in the eastern Donbas region, where fierce fighting is taking place between Ukrainian and Russian troops. Ms Venediktova said that although Ukrainian authorities did not have access to the Russian-held areas of Donbas, they were interviewing evacuees and prisoners of war. More on Ukraine Related Topics: Prosecutors are investigating claims of people being tortured, civilians being killed and civilian infrastructure being destroyed, Ms Venediktova said.Other allegations have been made about Ukrainian children and adults being forcibly taken to Russia, she said.Read more: Ukraine war: 'My child has gone and I'm so sad… but he died a hero and I'm proud of him for that' Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player 4:53 Russian advance on Severodonetsk Russian soldiers convictedRussian forces have previously been accused of killing civilians in Bucha and other Kyiv suburbs, as well as repeated assaults on civilian infrastructure, which include hospitals and a theatre in Mariupol that was sheltering hundreds of civilians.On Tuesday, a Ukrainian court convicted two Russian soldiers of war crimes for the shelling of civilian buildings.They were jailed for 11-and-a-half years in prison.The first conviction linked to the conflict in Ukraine was last week, when a captured Russian soldier was sentenced to life in prison for killing a civilian. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player 4:13 City under relentless shelling Russia has denied targeting civilians or involvement in war crimes.Ms Venediktova said Estonia, Latvia and Slovakia have decided to join an international investigation team in Ukraine that includes Lithuania and Poland.US to send more advanced rocket systems to UkraineIt comes as Ukraine civilians fear for their lives in the eastern region of Luhansk, where Russians are fighting to take control of Severodonetsk, one of the last remaining cities held by Ukraine.US President Joe Biden reinforced his commitment to helping the country defend itself, announcing that he would send more advanced rocket systems and munitions as part of a $700m (£556m) weapons package expected to be unveiled today. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player 5:47 On the frontline with 93rd Brigade In an opinion article in the New York Times, Mr Biden said the US has "moved quickly to send Ukraine a significant amount of weaponry and ammunition so it can fight on the battlefield and be in the strongest possible position at the negotiating table".But he emphasised that he does not seek a war between NATO and Russia."As much as I disagree with Mr. Putin, and find his actions an outrage, the US will not try to bring about his ouster in Moscow," he said. Subscribe to the Ukraine War Diaries on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify and Spreaker"So long as the United States or our allies are not attacked, we will not be directly engaged in this conflict, either by sending American troops to fight in Ukraine or by attacking Russian forces."We are not encouraging or enabling Ukraine to strike beyond its borders."

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japan times

Japan expands daily arrival cap to 20,000 as COVID fears recede

Japan on Wednesday doubled the cap on daily arrivals to the country as it continues to ease its COVID-19 border controls amid receding worries about the pandemic. The country also exempted people from isolation and COVID-19 testing upon entry when they come from 98 countries and regions presenting the lowest risk of infection, including the United States, Britain, China and South Korea. This means some 80% of the entrants are exempted. Unable to view this article? This could be due to a conflict with your ad-blocking or security software. Please add japantimes.co.jp and piano.io to your list of allowed sites. If this does not resolve the issue or you are unable to add the domains to your allowlist, please see out this support page. We humbly apologize for the inconvenience.

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BBC News – Business RSS Feed – World News

'I was a poor kid but it put steely determination in me'

SharecloseShare pageCopy linkAbout sharingImage source, FanbytesAs a young, black entrepreneur with few industry contacts, Timothy Armoo, 27 has more than beaten the odds to raise investment, scale and then sell his start-up. He grew up on a council estate in south London and puts some of his success down to a "lucky break" as a teenager."When I talk to my girlfriend about it," says Mr Armoo, "she goes, 'you know that you're not meant to be able do this?'" Mr Armoo founded his social media advertising business, Fanbytes, in 2017, building it up to employ 65 people. The London company connects social media influencers with big brands for promotion work. He has just sold the business to a larger advertising firm called Brainlabs for an eight-figure sum, he says - both companies are in private hands so the exact sum has not been disclosed.It is still incredibly difficult for black entrepreneurs to access funding for start-ups.Less than one per cent of venture capital investment in the UK went to black entrepreneurs between 2009 and 2019, according to a recent report by Extend Ventures - a similar figure to the United States. And recent government statistics suggest black-owned businesses are four times more likely to have their business loan applications rejected, than white or South Asian business founders.Image source, FanbytesMr Armoo was born in Hackney in London but moved to Ghana to live with his grandmother when he was 3 months old, remaining there for ten years.Returning to London in his early teens, he lived in Mawby House council estate on the Old Kent Road, in a flat with his father, a first generation immigrant. "I was a poor kid, we never had a lot of money and it put some steely determination in me," says Mr Armoo.But then he got what he calls "a lucky break", when he won a sixth-form scholarship to independent school, Christ's Hospital in London, where boarding fees are more than £12,000 per term."It introduced me to a world I hadn't known before," he says."There was a kid who one day got picked up by helicopter. It opened up my eyes and gave me a sense of confidence for what is possible, even though there weren't that many people who looked like me there.He says the experience gave him confidence "in how to talk in certain circles, the subjects you engage in," he then used those skills building Fanbytes for meeting investors among other things.This video can not be playedTo play this video you need to enable JavaScript in your browser.Mr Armoo has also capitalised on the growing value of social media influencers in advertising.Fanbytes signs up social media stars on TikTok, Instagram and Snapchat, getting them to work with big brands to collaborate on their advertising campaigns. Mr Armoo created Fanbytes with two other black entrepreneurs and close friends, Ambrose Cooke and Mitchell Fasanya. Mr Cooke developed the company's proprietary algorithm as part of his university dissertation at Imperial College, London. It scrapes data to search for up-and-coming social media influencers - meaning Fanbytes can sign them up before they get popular and expensive.These days it works with some of TikTok's biggest stars, like Rhia, from the UK, who is a toy influencer with more than 14m followers, and vlogger Bella Poarch, who has 89m followers. Clients have included everyone from Deliveroo to the UK government. Fanbytes has been bought up by Brainlabs, a digital advertising company set up in 2012 by former Google employee Daniel Gilbert."Influencer marketing has rapidly become an integral part of the digital media mix and influencers have become the new A-listers," says Mr Gilbert, "so to be able to offer it alongside our other capabilities under one roof is a huge advantage to our clients." TikTok's advertising revenue is likely to triple to $11bn in 2022, more than the combined ad revenues of Twitter and Snapchat, according to research firm, Insider Intelligence."Influencer advertising is growing in importance to brands, as people spend increasing amounts of time looking at content from social media personalities," says Rebecca McGrath, Mintel's associate director for Media and Technology.Nearly one in five (19%) people who viewed influencer content bought a product or service after seeing an influencer promote it on social media in the three months to November 2021, according to a recent Mintel report.This means advertising firms that still focus on traditional advertising, like print, in the future might start buying smaller start-ups dedicated specifically to influencers, says Ms McGrath.Image source, Timothy ArmooMr Armoo hopes that he can inspire others to follow in his footsteps.One of the biggest hindrances for black founders says Mr Armoo, "is that they don't see other people like them doing it, which would normalise success. The funding is there, and the opportunities are there."Mr Armoo has been sharing his business advice on his social media accounts."I've always seen myself as an entrepreneur first, then a black entrepreneur," he says. "Otherwise, you start to put too much emphasis on your race and you start to think about all the statistics around lower funding rates, or lack of exits, which results in you mentally playing on the back foot. "Be objective, and solve problems. Focus on being so good they can't ignore you."For more entrepreneurship stories you can follow Dougal on TwitterMore on this story'I change how I look and talk to fit in at work''I am only the UK's sixth black female QC'The rise of the racism exposé pageWhat hurdles do black women in business face?

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japan times

1972: 3 Japanese kill 26 at Tel Aviv

100 YEARS AGO Saturday, June 24, 1922 Unable to view this article? This could be due to a conflict with your ad-blocking or security software. Please add japantimes.co.jp and piano.io to your list of allowed sites. If this does not resolve the issue or you are unable to add the domains to your allowlist, please see out this support page. We humbly apologize for the inconvenience.

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Sky News US

Man dies in alligator-filled lake while looking for frisbees

A man has died in a suspected alligator attack while looking for frisbees in a lake.The 47-year-old was combing the water at Taylor Park Disc Golf Course in Largo, Florida, where people are warned to beware of the aggressive reptiles. "At this time, detectives believe the victim was looking for frisbees in the water and a gator was involved," Largo police said."There are posted signs of no swimming in the lake."A specialist is working to remove an alligator from the lake and experts will then try to establish if it was involved in the death, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said. Advertisement Visitors to the disc course say people are often seen looking for lost frisbees so they can be sold on for a few dollars. "These are people that are down on their luck," Ken Hostnick told the Tampa Bay Times. More on Florida Related Topics: "Sometimes they dive in the lakes, they'll pull out 40 discs. You may sell them for five bucks a piece, and you may sell them for 10 bucks a piece, depending on the quality."Police are telling people to avoid the lake while the investigation continues. If confirmed, this would be the first fatal alligator attack in Florida since 2019, though people and animals have been bitten from from time to time.Wildlife officials stress that no one should approach a wild alligator or feed them, because the reptiles then associate people with food. Once considered endangered animals in Florida, alligators have since flourished and can be found almost anywhere in the state.

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Sky News world

'We just want it over': Ukrainians cling to life in key city as savage shelling intensifies

The horizon in Lysychansk is crowded with plumes of smoke from recently exploded shells.As we drive into the city in eastern Ukraine, another has just landed and is billowing out black, choking smoke from what looks like the middle of a group of homes. The streets look markedly devoid of life compared to the last time we were here just a day or two earlier.It is shocking how quickly the situation has deteriorated. And that is really saying something about a city where life has been utterly grim for three months now.They've had no electricity or running water during most of that time and they've had the daily torture of seeing and hearing Russian troops bombard and smash their way into their twin city of Severodonetsk with an increasingly savage determination. Advertisement But somehow it seems to have got worse. Image: Civilians in Lysychansk like Yelena have been left devastated by the conflict "We just want this all over," Yelena says to us as she sits on the step outside her apartment. More on Ukraine Related Topics: We tell them there have been videos on the internet purporting to show Chechen fighters in the centre of Severodonetsk boasting of taking the city.The fighters have filmed themselves smiling and greeting residents there as they reassure them they have "liberated" the city.Read more:'My child has gone… but he died a hero and I'm proud of him for that' The people of Lysychansk know they will be next. The twin cities are the last pocket of Luhansk province still under Ukrainian control.Once they fall, the Russians will be able to claim control over half of the region known as the Donbas in eastern Ukraine.Oleh Hryhorov, the Luhansk police chief, has been leading a small team who've been helping to evacuate those desperate to get out of Severodonetsk.Most routes are now impassable, so they've been trying to get people out on small boats. Image: An unexploded missile in Lysychansk "We've had two boats destroyed already," Oleh tells us. "Every time they see we have another route, they shell."He shows us the armoured truck that had been used to evacuate people the day before.The front windscreen has a huge hole in it where shrapnel from a shell pierced it.A French journalist, Frederic Leclerc-Imhoff, who was there to cover the evacuations, sustained grave injuries from flying shrapnel and died.Read more:How Putin's invasion is causing a worldwide food crisis Image: A flat that had been hit by a missile in Sloviansk Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player 4:53 Russian advance on Severodonetsk The police believe the truck was deliberately targeted after "collaborators" tipped off Russian forces.They've rounded up between 30 to 40 collaborators, the police say, who have guided rockets and missiles in on their neighbours and fellow residents."They're murderers," Oleh says. "This is not war on the front line, this is war with civilians and the town and they destroy all life." Image: Oleh and his fellow police insist the twin cities will not be taken He says Lysychansk is not safe now."I advise you not to be here," he says. But yet again he and his fellow police insist the twin cities will not be taken."We will not allow it. Our army will not allow it," Oleh insists. Image: 'I just want peace', Yudmela says But from where we're standing, on the brow of the hill overlooking Severodonetsk, it's difficult to see how they're going to be able to hold on. The Russian forces are said to have control of at least half of the city now.The Ukrainians seem unable to stop the Russians, who are advancing on three fronts in the Donbas.They are pushing on flanks in the south, east and from the north towards the city of Sloviansk, and there's been a dramatic uptick in attacks in Sloviansk over the past 48 hours. Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player 5:47 On the frontline with 93rd Brigade The windows and frames of our accommodation shook as the city was attacked overnight.We stood at the back of the building and watched the red glow of fire as homes and apartments burned and lives were upended. By morning, the impact was clearly extensive wrecking at least three apartment blocks.Taking Sloviansk would be a huge symbolic victory for the Russians: it was first captured by pro-Kremlin fighters briefly in 2014 but then taken back swiftly by the Ukrainians. Subscribe to the Ukraine War Diaries on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify and SpreakerThey don't want to lose it again, but the overnight attacks are an indication of just how savage this fresh battle in the Donbas is.So many in the Donbas are weary of war. They don't want a divide - they just want the brutality to stop.Yudmela tells us: "I just want peace. I just want them to leave us alone."But it doesn't look like that is happening anytime soon.

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Sky News US

Johnny Depp appears on stage with Jeff Beck for third time as he awaits libel trial verdict

Johnny Depp has appeared on stage alongside Jeff Beck for a third night, amid his ongoing US legal battle with ex-wife Amber Heard.Depp performed alongside the rock legend at London's Royal Albert Hall on Tuesday night, the third time this week. It comes as the world awaits the verdict in his high-profile defamation trial against Ms Heard.Jurors in the multi-million dollar case were sent out on Friday. Just 48 hours later, Depp turned up at Sheffield City Hall to play on Beck's European tour.They appeared on stage together once again at the Royal Albert Hall on Monday night and repeated the feat on Tuesday. Advertisement Their performance included a rendition of their 2020 collaboration Isolation, a cover of the song John Lennon released in 1970. The pair were seen waving together and embracing on stage on Tuesday, Depp wearing a bandana to pin back his long hair. More on Amber Heard Related Topics: Footage of Depp singing and playing the guitar was posted on social media earlier this week, showing audience members cheering and applauding the Hollywood star."He came knocking on my dressing room door about five years ago, and we haven't stopped laughing since," said Beck in one video."We kept it quiet because… obvious reasons… here he is."The 58-year-old Pirates Of The Caribbean star's appearances in the UK has surprised many as he awaits the verdict in his lawsuit with Heard.Depp is suing Heard for $50m over an article she wrote in The Washington Post in 2018 in which she described herself as "a public figure representing domestic abuse".

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